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Shimano AM7 Review

The Shimano AM7 is a comfortable entry-level gravity-oriented shoe.
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Price:  $130 List | $79.97 at Competitive Cyclist
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  comfortable, versatile, great traction while hiking, laces allow for high adjustability
Cons:  not the stiffest, no quick adjustment, style may not be appreciated by some
Manufacturer:   Shimano
By Dillon Osleger ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Jul 22, 2019
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73
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#15 of 17
  • Power Transfer - 30% 6
  • Comfort - 20% 8
  • Traction Walkability - 20% 9
  • Weight - 15% 7
  • Durability - 15% 7

Our Verdict

Shimano's AM7 was designed to fulfill the needs of non-racing enduro/trail riders; it quickly became the go-to shoe for many riders looking for a skate-style trail shoe at an affordable price. The AM7 combines comfort and casual style with decent pedaling performance and off the bike traction and walkability. This shoe is not ideal for weight conscious riders or those who demand the highest levels of power transfer. Instead, it is a great entry-level gravity or all-mountain shoe for riders who prefer the descents and don't want to break the bank.


Compare to Similar Products

 
This Product
Shimano AM7
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  Top Pick Award 
Price $79.97 at Competitive Cyclist
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$164.95 at Competitive Cyclist
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$180 List$200.00 at REI
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$180.00 at Amazon
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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros comfortable, versatile, great traction while hiking, laces allow for high adjustabilityLightweight, comfortable, stiff, great power transfer, vibram soles, customizable insolesLightweight, comfortable, versatile, Boa closures, styling, reasonable priceGrippy rubber soles, good foot protection, comfortable, great power transfercomfortable, versatile, great traction while hiking, boa closures, good style
Cons not the stiffest, no quick adjustment, style may not be appreciated by someNo on-the-fly adjustments, limited foot protection, expensiveRoomy toe-box, slip-not rubber could be more grippyPotential durability issuesSometimes too grippy for a clipless focused shoe, heavy
Bottom Line The Shimano AM7 is a comfortable entry-level gravity-oriented shoe.The Empire VR90 is the lightest, stiffest, and most comfortable shoe in our test and the winner of our Editors' Choice award.Our Top Pick for Trail Riders, the 2FO Cliplite is a unique looking shoe packed with performance and features from one of the biggest brands in the bike industry.The ME7 is a thoughtfully designed, versatile, and high performance all mountain and enduro shoe.The Five Ten Kestrel Pro Boa is our Top Pick for Enduro Racers and those partaking in regular extensive hike-a-bike sections
Rating Categories Shimano AM7 Giro Empire VR90 Specialized 2FO Cliplite Shimano ME7 Five Ten Kestrel Pro Boa
Power Transfer (30%)
10
0
6
10
0
10
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
8
Comfort (20%)
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
Traction Walkability (20%)
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
10
10
0
9
Weight (15%)
10
0
7
10
0
10
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
6
Durability (15%)
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
6
10
0
9
Specs Shimano AM7 Giro Empire VR90 Specialized 2FO... Shimano ME7 Five Ten Kestrel...
Closure Laces plus power strap Laces 2 Boa S2-Snap dials, velcro strap over the forefoot Speed lace system and upper ratchet strap, Large velcro panel over laces Boa dial plus velcro at toe box
Measured Weight 445 grams 388 grams 426 grams 425 grams 511 grams
Width Options Regular regular and high volume Regular Regular Regular
Upper Material Synthetic leather Microfiber Thermobonded upper Synthetic Synthetic
Footbed Cup insole molded EVA footbed Specialized Body Geometry Extra-cushion insole OrthoLite
Sole Vibram Easton EC90 Carbon Fiber Nylon Composite Carbon fiber composite sole/midsole Carbon-infused nylon shank
Outsole Vibram Vibram Mont Molded Rubber High Traction Lugged Outsole, Mid-Foot Scuff Guard, Accomodates Steel Toe Spikes SlipNot rubber sole Michelin rubber outsole Steatlh C4 rubber
Size Tested 45 45 43.5 44 10.5

Our Analysis and Test Results

The AM7 was made with gravity-oriented and trail riding in mind. This is plain to see in the casual styling of the shoe and it's lower power transfer scores. It's not a stiff as most of the competition, but we feel it is a good option for less competitive riders who value comfort and off-the-bike versatility. It's also reasonably priced, making it a great option for the rider on a budget. This shoe pairs the best with large platform clipless pedals but also works relatively well with small platform pedals.

Performance Comparison



Comfort


The AM7 has a decidely casual skate-shoe inspired looks and the comfort to match. The shoe is laced up like any regular skate shoe with shoelaces would be, while a velcro strap across the upper foot is employed to keep laces from loosening or ending up in your drivetrain. The strap across the top of the foot also plays the important role of locking the foot down against the sole of the shoe and aids in power transfer. Overall, the fit is snug, though far from the super tight race performance fit of an XC style shoe.

The AM7 employs Shimano's synthetic leather for its uppers which is supple and conforms nicely to the feet after only a few rides. The synthetic material is generally pretty water resistant and shrugs off splashes of mud and creek crossings. Should they get completely soaked we found them to dry relatively quickly. At the top of the ankle cuff is a short neoprene cuff that extends slightly above the top of the shoe. This cuff is intended to keep rocks and debris from entering the shoe from the top. While this cuff does make contact with the ankle area, testers never found it to chafe them or cause any other discomfort, plus it works as intended.

The AM7 shoes are also relatively well ventilated for a shoe of this style. Mesh ventilation panels on both sides of the foot as well as small perforations on top of the toes help keep your feet cooler than when wearing similar shoes like the Five Ten Hellcat Pro of the Giro Chamber II. Testers also found the included footbed to provide ample support and comfortable cradle for the arch and heel.

The Shimano SH-AM7 holds up in loose  wet  and slippery conditions thanks to grippy full coverage rubber sole.
The Shimano SH-AM7 holds up in loose, wet, and slippery conditions thanks to grippy full coverage rubber sole.

Weight


The AM7 is not a lightweight shoe. In fact, at 445g, it is one of the heaviest shoes in our test selection behind other gravity-focused models like the Five Ten Kestral Pro Boa and Giro Chamber II. With an intention of creating a simple shoe that would stay comfortable all day while handing general trail duties, Shimano created a shoe right in the middle of the use spectrum and that is reflected in their heavier weight that most people interested in XC racing will scoff at.

Weight and power transfer are the AM7's poorest traits  but it's still a great option for more gravity oriented riders and casual everyday trail rides.
Weight and power transfer are the AM7's poorest traits, but it's still a great option for more gravity oriented riders and casual everyday trail rides.

Power Transfer


Shimano rates the stiffness of their mountain bike shoes on a scale of 1-11. On this scale, the AM7 are rated at a middle of the road 6. This is in contrast to the XC-focused S-Phyre XC9 with a sole stiffness of 11. The difference in power transfer between these two shoe models is very noticeable. That said, everyday trail riders or casual gravity riders who are more focused on comfort and fun will likely find the power transfer of the AM7 to be adequate for their needs.

The AM7 received one of the lowest scores for power transfer on our test, though this isn't a race shoe, nor is it intended to be. Anyone looking to mix it up inside the tape on the downhill or enduro track will be happier with stiffer soled models like the Five Ten Kestrel Pro Boa or the Giro Chamber II.

The AM7 has a preference for riding downhill but has a relatively solid all-around performance that will please a good portion of riders.
The AM7 has a preference for riding downhill but has a relatively solid all-around performance that will please a good portion of riders.

Traction Walkability


The AM7's full coverage Ultra-grip rubber sole provides excellent grip and traction. The rubber soles have wall to wall coverage with the exception fo the recessed cleat mount area. They basically look like the sole of a typical flat pedal shoe. We found this rubber to provide excellent traction on nearly all surfaces and we felt confident in our footing during short rocky hike a bikes and the like. In wet or muddy conditions we found the flatter sole design to provide somewhat less traction than soles that have larger lugs that dig into and bite in soft wet mud.

Off the bike walkability was some of the best in the test. This is thanks to the more flexible sole that feels a bit less plank-y than some of the stiffer competitors. There's also plenty of flex through the toe that allows for a relatively normal gait. These are definitely some of the most comfortable shoes for extended periods of walking.

The AM7 is comfortable and confidence inspiring when you end up in a hike a bike situation.
The AM7 is comfortable and confidence inspiring when you end up in a hike a bike situation.

Durability


As with most things Shimano makes, the AM7 simply works and does so with little complaint. The uppers are still in pretty good shape, although a tad scuffed up after a month of riding in them, while the soles still look to have plenty of life left in them. Our biggest gripe is the laces used by Shimano, which don't appear to last as long as the tighter weave laces provided by Giro on the Empire VR90 nor the Boa laces on many other shoes we tested. We've also seen reports of minor sole delamination issues in online reviews, although we never experienced this with our test pair.

Best Applications


The AM7 was designed with gravity-oriented riding in mind, and it performs well in these applications. It is also a reasonable choice for riders who aren't as concerned with weight or power transfer for nearly all other types of riding, from trail rides to big backcountry epics. Those looking to put down the power during gravity races should look towards the stiffer soled and burlier shoes. Hardcore XC racers will also probably look for lighter and stiffer options such as the editors choice Giro Empire VR90, the Scott MTB Team Boa, or the Shimano S-Phyre XC9.

Value


With a retail price of $130, the AM7 falls on the low end of the price spectrum for the shoes in our test selection. This is easily the best value for a shoe of this style that we've tested. Avoiding the trend of newer technologies like BOA dials or carbon fiber, Shimano has created a comfortable workhorse of a shoe that would be a great value for most trail riders, especially those that lean towards the gravity side of things.

The AM7 is at home riding berms  doing shuttle laps  and on more casual trail rides.
The AM7 is at home riding berms, doing shuttle laps, and on more casual trail rides.

Conclusion


The AM7 is a simple and well-designed mountain bike shoe with casual skate shoe inspired styling. The Ultra-grip sole provides excellent traction, and a casual appearance makes it acceptable for apres beers. It doesn't pack quite the performance as our top-rated gravity and enduro models, but it is a solid value that gets the job done for non-competitive riders. We feel comfortable in saying it is a great mountain bike shoe that will appeal to the vast majority of recreational trail riders, especially those with a preference for the descents.


Dillon Osleger