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Ortlieb Atrack 25 Review

A pack that has managed the seemingly impossible: complete submergibility while still maintaining excellent ease of use.
Top Pick Award
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Price:  $265 List | $264.95 at Backcountry
Pros:  Submersible, Durable, Comfortable, Duffel-zipper makes access easy
Cons:  Heavy
Manufacturer:   Ortlieb
By Dan Scott ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Jul 26, 2019
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75
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#3 of 16
  • Comfort - 25% 10
  • Weight - 25% 4
  • Versatility - 25% 7
  • Ease of Use - 15% 9
  • Durability - 10% 9

Our Verdict

The Ortlieb Atrack 25 defines an entirely new class of daypack. Usually, waterproof or submersible bags are difficult to use, obnoxious, and uncomfortable. The Atrack takes advantage of the burly zipper needed to make a pack submersible and places it in a way that provides a well-ventilated and supportive suspension, an easy to open/organize main compartment, and versatile compression straps that can accommodate any kind of gear. If not for its weight, this pack would have made Editors' Choice. That said, it can take a serious beating with its thick, burly fabric, and we wouldn't want it any other way. If you spend any reasonable amount of time around water, this is the best daypack you can find. If supreme waterproofing would be overkill for you, check out the pack that did win Editors' Choice for heavier loads: the REI Co-op Traverse 35.


Compare to Similar Products

 
This Product
Ortlieb Atrack 25
Awards Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award  
Price $264.95 at Backcountry$139.00 at REI$109.95 at Backcountry
Compare at 3 sellers
$54.95 at REI$39.95 at REI
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Pros Submersible, Durable, Comfortable, Duffel-zipper makes access easyComfortable, stabilizes heavy loads, thoughtful design, modular, recycled fabrics.Tons of features, fully adjustable, comfortable, well ventilated, separate hydration compartmentLightweight, only the necessary features, comfortable suspension for the weight.Affordable, minimalist design, lightweight, super packable.
Cons HeavyNon-adjustable frame, only decent ventilation.Runs small, side mesh pockets are debatably smallUncomfortable with heavy loads, not durable.Few features, thin shoulder straps and hip belt.
Bottom Line A pack that has managed the seemingly impossible: complete submergibility while still maintaining excellent ease of use.The most comfortable and stable daypack in our review also has just the right features for many outdoor adventures.This pack offers a time tested versatile design that is ready for any adventure.This pack is an excellent value, providing all-around performance for light and fast activities at a bargain price.A simple pack that's easy on the wallet, ultralight, and super popular.
Rating Categories Ortlieb Atrack 25 REI Co-op Traverse 35 Osprey Talon 22 REI Co-op Flash 22 REI Co-op Flash 18
Comfort (25%)
10
0
10
10
0
10
10
0
9
10
0
6
10
0
5
Weight (25%)
10
0
4
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
10
Versatility (25%)
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
6
Ease Of Use (15%)
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
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7
10
0
8
10
0
7
Durability (10%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
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7
10
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5
10
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4
Specs Ortlieb Atrack 25 REI Co-op Traverse... Osprey Talon 22 REI Co-op Flash 22 REI Co-op Flash 18
Weight (ounces) 51.835 53.69 27.44 12.64 9.07
Measured volume (liters) 30.3 48.34 22.56 23.44 17.89
Back Construction External wire frame Spring steel Vented, contoured Simple foam pad Simple foam pad
Hydration no sleeve, but straps inside Internal hydration sleeve Externally accessed sleeve, holds up to 3L, bladder not included Internal hydration sleeve Internal hydration sleeve
Hipbelt broad, padded, textured 3D Contoured hip belt Broad, padded, with pockets 3/4" webbing removable 3/4" webbing removable
Number of pockets 9 9 9 5 2
Description of Pockets 1 main duffel-style TIZIP zipper, 2 small internal zippered organizational pockets, 2 large zippered organizational pockets, 2 side stretchy mesh, 2 hipbelt zippered stretchy mesh 1 main top loader, 1 outer flap with nylon/stretchy-mesh, 1 outer zippered, 1 top lid zippered, 1 top lid mesh, 2 side stretchy mesh, 2 hip belt 1 main compartment zippered, 1 stretchy mesh shoulder strap, 2 waist zippered, 2 side stretchy mesh, 1 back stretchy mesh, 1 top zippered, 1 open hydration reservoir pocket behind back panel 1 main top loader, 2 side stretchy mesh, 1 top lid zippered, 1 outer zippered 1 main top loader, 1 outer zippered
Materials PVC-free waterproof nylon Recycled 200D ripstop nylon, recycled 400D Oxford packcloth Nylon Nylon Nylon
Outside Carry Options modular strap attachment system: 4 side compression straps included, top and bottom vertical straps, optional helmet carrier and extra modular straps Ice axe loop and bungee holder, 12 attachment loops along bottom and sides of pack Bungee helmet tab, Blinker light patch, ice axe loop and bungee holder, front-side pole carry bungee loops Ice axe loop and bungee holder, daisy chains, attachment loops around back panel 1 exterior daisy chain
Whistle No Yes Yes Yes Yes
Key Clip Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Notable other Features waterproof and submersible, fully adjustable frame, duffel style opening for easy access Uplift compression straps really tighten down the load Blinker patch, front-side pole carry loops Removeable foam back panel doubles as sit pad, removeable sternum and hip belt straps, attachment loops to add compression cords Removeable foam back panel doubles as sit pad, removeable sternum and hip belt straps
Weight : Volume (oz/L) 1.71 1.11 1.22 0.54 0.51
Weight : Volume Ranking 17 9 13 2 1

Our Analysis and Test Results

With its burly, waterproof fabric, giant TIZIP zipper running down the middle of the suspension, and unusually external frame, the Ortlieb Atrack 25 can seem a bit odd compared to typical daypacks. Once you get used to its design, however, it really shines. We gave it a Top Pick for wet activities: skiing, boating, hiking 9 months out of the year in the Pacific Northwest, canyoneering, etc. It will keep your gear dry, but it also has the outside attachments and pockets to make organization a breeze. The external frame is burly and is paired with a supportive suspension system to carry even heavy loads. If you want a pack that will be just as effective as a travel duffel, hiking pack, or for keeping gear bone dry while literally swimming with it, this is likely the only pack on the market that will fit the bill.

Performance Comparison


The Atrack (shown in blue below) doesn't have any clear competition - it nearly defines its own category of packs. That said, it fits in best with other heavy-hauler packs in this review like the REI Co-op Traverse 35, as opposed to the lighter, running- and biking-friendly packs like the REI Co-op Flash 22 or the Osprey Talon 22. We award it a Top Pick, as it shined in all the usual daypack performance metrics while also being completely waterproof, something few other packs can claim.

This is an excellent daypack for travel or hiking  but it really shines around water.
This is an excellent daypack for travel or hiking, but it really shines around water.

Comfort


Unlike most packs that feature an internal frame, the Ortlieb Atrack 25 utilizes a simple, 2-part wireframe onto which independent and adjustable shoulder straps and hip belts are attached. The thick and rounded padding doesn't rub, distributes weight, and hugs your torso once properly adjusted.


The Atrack features fully adjustable torso height, accomplished using two ladder lock buckles and straps that move the shoulder straps up and down the wireframe. Coupled with the load lifters, we found this suspension to be just as easily adjustable and comfortable as suspensions on the Osprey Stratos 34 and the Osprey Talon 22. Both of these models feature highly refined and comfortable suspensions. The hip belt is differentially padded to provide lumbar support and wrap snugly around your waist, supporting even heavy loads over 30 pounds.

The Atrack's fully adjustable and minimalist suspension is well padded and extremely ventilated. The straps going from the shoulder padding to the waist belt allow you to adjust the torso length.
The Atrack's fully adjustable and minimalist suspension is well padded and extremely ventilated. The straps going from the shoulder padding to the waist belt allow you to adjust the torso length.

The nature of the suspension on the Atrack makes ventilation come naturally. Without resorting to suspended mesh (that can catch brush and create dead space), the minimalist suspension of the Atrack places a solid centimeter or two between your back and the pack material. The access zipper rests right behind your back, but it doesn't touch your back. We loved being able to work hard on a hot day, literally jump in a stream with this pack, and come out cooled off, with bone dry gear and a fast-drying suspension that didn't hold onto water.

Compression also comes naturally to this pack. While other well-designed packs like the REI Co-op Traverse 35 and the Arc'teryx Brize 25 rely on adjustable compression straps to bring loads closer to your back, the Atrack accomplishes the same by virtue of its air-tight TIZIP zipper. Just load up the pack, distribute your gear as you please, squeeze all the air out, and zip it uptight. Just like a vacuum-sealed bag, the load will stay right where you put it, pressed tight against the frame. In our calisthenics testing, this pack kept loads right against our backs with no bouncing, even when twisting, jumping, or running. This also frees up the compression straps for carrying gear without compromising load distribution.

Even fully loaded with pack rafting gear  this pack keeps the load right against your back and moves easily with you.
Even fully loaded with pack rafting gear, this pack keeps the load right against your back and moves easily with you.

The Ortlieb Atrack 25 balances frame stiffness and range of motion. The frame can bend slightly, and the shoulder straps can move slightly on the frame. This reduces comfort very slightly on long days compared to a pack like the REI Co-op Traverse 35, but makes reaching over your head or bending over to grab bike handles a bit easier. The Osprey Talon 22 allows for greater range of motion due to its soft frame, but doesn't carry heavy loads nearly as well.

Weight-to-Volume Ratio


The only metric in which the Atrack suffers is weight. It comes in near the bottom of the packs we tested, with a weight-to-volume ratio of 1.71 oz/L. This is similar to the Osprey Stratos 34, and a far cry from top lightweight performers like the REI Co-op Flash 22 (0.54 oz/L) or the Mountain Hardwear Scrambler 35 (0.86 oz/L).


It would be difficult to build a fully submersible and durable pack like this without making it pretty heavy. The thick, durable nylon, TIZIP duffel zipper, and metal frame all add up to a heavy pack, but you get functionality that no other pack can provide. To cut some weight, you can remove the modular compression straps, but you would sacrifice the excellent external carrying options this pack provides. If you don't need the extreme durability or waterproofing, check out the similarly comfortable, but much lighter-for-its-volume REI Co-op Traverse 35.

This pack is heavy  but it can take a serious beating as a result. On this trip  we swam  hiked  bushwhacked  scrambled  and paddled with it for 4 days straight without managing to do much more than get the pack a bit dirty.
This pack is heavy, but it can take a serious beating as a result. On this trip, we swam, hiked, bushwhacked, scrambled, and paddled with it for 4 days straight without managing to do much more than get the pack a bit dirty.

Versatility


During our months of testing, we used the Atrack for hiking, biking, scrambling, bushwhacking, swimming, and pack rafting. The external straps make it easy to carry all sorts of bulky gear without closing up access to the main compartment. Because the access to the main compartment is against your back, and there are 6 straps running across the back of the pack, it's easy to carry gear for almost any activity. Even when carrying skis A-frame style, you can easily unzip the main zipper and get into the pack.


We would certainly hesitate to commute with this pack, but for almost any outdoor endeavor, it works great. The comfortable suspension combined with an easily compressible main compartment feel great whether you're carrying gear for a short day hike or a long, multi-sport adventure.

The compression straps on the Atrack can be moved up and down the pack  or removed entirely. Between the 4 included compression straps and the top and bottom straps  you can fit a lot big gear on the outside of this pack!
The compression straps on the Atrack can be moved up and down the pack, or removed entirely. Between the 4 included compression straps and the top and bottom straps, you can fit a lot big gear on the outside of this pack!

After running a bike shuttle for a pack rafting trip with this pack, we found that the slightly flexible suspension makes it passable for biking. We prefer a fully flexible frame and smaller hip belt, like those found on the Osprey Talon 22 for a dedicated biking pack, but this one was at least moderately comfortable. For fast-and-light activities, an ultralight pack like the North Face Chimera 24 or REI Co-op Flash 22 would likely be just as good as this pack, but would save a lot of weight.

Ease of Use


The duffel-style main zipper, which runs between the shoulder panels, makes this pack a cinch to load and unload. We loved being able to open it up and sort through our gear easily.


The Atrack 25 has 4 zippered compartments within the main compartment, as well as a buckled strap to keep things organized within the compartment. We liked being able to store layers and food freely in the main compartment while arranging our clothing accessories, small gear, and electronics in the zippered compartments. While the main duffel-style zipper is a stiff and sometimes hard-to-pull TIZIP zipper, we found that we got used it it quickly and after a few days, we were able to zip and unzip it about as fast as most other zippers.

The interior of the pack has 4 zippered organizational pockets and a buckle to separate items within the main compartment.
The interior of the pack has 4 zippered organizational pockets and a buckle to separate items within the main compartment.

The stretchy mesh pockets on the hip belt and sides of the pack were great for snacks, waterproof electronics, jackets, and water bottles. We found the side mesh pockets (not waterproof!) to be easy to access while wearing the pack, like those on the REI Traverse 35. The hip belt pockets held 2 large bars, or 1 large smartphone easily. However, because they are so stretchy, stuffing them full may lead to durability problems.

We regularly loaded up the hip belt pockets with snacks and left our water bottle and jacket in the side pocket/compression straps.
We regularly loaded up the hip belt pockets with snacks and left our water bottle and jacket in the side pocket/compression straps.

Between the 6 outer compression straps, 2 hipbelt pockets, 2 side pockets, and 4 zippered organizational pockets in the main compartment, this pack was easy to organize. And, if you don't need organization in the main compartment, the zippered pockets run flush along the sides of the pack, making them easy to push out of the way.

The Atrack 25 also is hydration reservoir compatible. A tightly plugged hole in the pack just above the right shoulder strap can be filled with a plug that has a hole for a hydration hose. While it's difficult to reconfigure the pack and install the hose the first time, it maintains a lot of the pack's waterproofing while still allowing you to use a hydration reservoir. That said, we much prefer the easy to use external reservoir compartments on packs like the Osprey Talon 22 or North Face Chimera 24.

Durability


We take claims of submersibility as a challenge, and this pack did not disappoint. We once zipped this pack up full of gear, then held it underwater (not easy, as it floats), placed a knee on it, and ground its zipper into the gravel bed of a river. After about a minute of this, we took it out to find not only no leaks, but also no damage to the zipper. Our lead tester also swam parts of the Hoh River with this pack, where it kept sensitive research equipment bone dry the whole time.


The burly fabric, external frame, and single-walled design make this pack relatively simple, durable, and likely easy to repair. While our bushwhacking and scrambling hardly scratched the tough material, its stiffness likely makes it vulnerable to punctures and abrasion in tough environments like narrow, sandstone slot canyons. If you depend on this pack's waterproofing, it wouldn't be a bad idea to carry a roll of repair tape.

Through mud  sand  gravel  and water  this pack is hard to beat up.
Through mud, sand, gravel, and water, this pack is hard to beat up.

The stretchy mesh on this pack is likely not going to be as durable as thicker mesh found on packs like the REI Traverse 35 or Osprey Stratos 34, but held up fine during our testing. Other than those, the TIZIP zipper is the only potential weak point on this pack. It's unlikely to be damaged by abrasion or impacts, but if you get it excessively dirty, it can fail to seal. Be sure to read the owner's manual and regularly grease the zipper to maintain its function. That said, we went a whole summer of hard use on this pack without greasing the zipper and experienced no negative results.

Our normal rain test was a bit of a joke for this pack, especially after we had submersed it in a river. However, even with the hydration hose coming out of the pack (this compromises its submersibility), it mostly keeps gear dry in the rain. Even after we sprayed the hydration port directly (the only place water could get in, and only if you have a hose installed), the inside of the pack had only two or three small drops of water. For rainy environments, this is a pack you really won't have to worry about.

Best Applications


This is a pack that works well for niche use: activities that require real waterproofing. However, it also works great for general use hiking, scrambling, or traveling. Organizing gear with the duffel-style opening is a breeze, the fabric and design make it super tough, and the frame and suspension are comfortable enough for a range of loads. We confidently award this pack a Top Pick for wet environments.

From packrafting to day hiking  this pack can really do it all.
From packrafting to day hiking, this pack can really do it all.

Value


The Ortlieb Atrack 25 is a high-end, top-performing pack with features that few other packs can offer. That demands an unusually high price for a daypack. While we would hesitate to spend this much on a single pack, we see this as a specialized piece of gear that not only enables us to seek out new and creative adventures (e.g., combining whitewater swimming, biking, and hiking), it also makes everyday adventures so much easier. If you can stomach the high purchase price, this pack will likely last you a very long time.

Conclusion


The Ortlieb Atrack 25 takes our Top Pick for wet environments, but it also provides the versatility to accompany you on a range of adventures. If you want true waterproofing, easy access to gear, and a really comfortable pack, this is the one for you. If the price is too high, or you don't absolutely need your gear to be bone dry all the time, check out our Editors' Choice REI Traverse 35, which is slightly more comfortable and has a more familiar daypack design.

With its duffel opening  waterproof design  and comfortable suspension  the Atrack performs near the top of the head.
With its duffel opening, waterproof design, and comfortable suspension, the Atrack performs near the top of the head.


Dan Scott