The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

REI Co-op Flash 22 Review

This pack is an excellent value, providing all-around performance for light and fast activities at a bargain price.
Best Buy Award
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Price:  $55 List | $54.95 at REI
Pros:  Lightweight, only the necessary features, comfortable suspension for the weight.
Cons:  Uncomfortable with heavy loads, not durable.
Manufacturer:   REI
By Dan Scott ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 13, 2019
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72
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#3 of 18
  • Comfort - 25% 6
  • Weight - 25% 9
  • Versatility - 25% 7
  • Ease of Use - 15% 8
  • Durability - 10% 5

Our Verdict

The REI Co-op Flash 22 punches above its price and weight to win our Best Buy award for 2019. REI made this pack even lighter this year, and streamlined the features and suspension. Every feature on this pack is carefully designed to minimize weight and maximize function. We used it for trail running, hiking, international travel, and commuting, and found it excelled at all of these activities. The pocket design makes it easy to use, and as long as you pack it carefully, the lightly padded suspension carries a load comfortably. While it can't handle heavier loads like our Editors' Choice Osprey Talon 22 or much burlier REI Co-op Traverse 35, no other pack balances cost, weight, and function as well as the Flash 22.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Best Buy award goes to the product that maximizes performance at a low price. The Flash 22 has won Best Buy before, and after a small update, it again takes the award. It is now 1.5 oz lighter and features a more streamlined lid and shoulder strap design. Through months of testing, we found that no feature on the Flash 22 was extraneous. The pocket arrangement, suspension, minimalist frame, and lightweight materials all function well together. While we wouldn't recommend it for loads much greater than around 15 pounds for regular use (although we've carried more in our Flash packs), it can work fine for trail runnning, hiking, mountain biking, climbing, and even commuting, as it fits a 14-inch laptop snugly in the hydration sleeve. For travel, the abundance of pockets and loops makes it perfect to use as a personal bag that can be tucked away in a larger bag when needed. A larger bag than this might be more your thing if you plan on doing more gear-intensive activities with your daypack, like snowshoeing or hauling gear for a group.

Performance Comparison


The REI Co-op Flash 22 (shown in blue in the chart below) scored well compared to other small daypacks, despite its minimalist construction. It scored moderately higher than its even more minimalist sibling, the REI Co-op Flash 18, which is slightly cheaper, but sacrifices the features that make the Flash 22 so easy to use. We try to balance performance and function in our Best Buy award. The Flash 22 is only $15 more expensive than the cheapest pack in our review, the Flash 18, but for $15, you get mesh stretch pockets, a lid, more comfortable suspension, and more modular attachment points on the outside of the pack. We think that's definitely worth it.

Ultralight packs can excel for light-and-fast pursuits  but only if they securely carry a load during dynamic activities.
Ultralight packs can excel for light-and-fast pursuits, but only if they securely carry a load during dynamic activities.

Comfort


The Flash 22 is a one-size-fits-most pack, but we found that it fit fine on testers ranging from 5'5"/110lbs to 6'5"/225 lbs. We liked that we could cinch it way down and clip the hipbelt around our midsection to stabilize the pack for running, or let out the shoulder straps a bit and place the hipbelt around our iliac crest to take some weight off our shoulders for hiking.


An improvement over the REI Co-op Flash 18, the Flash 22 features more padded shoulder straps, with padding that rolls over the top of the shoulder strap around the top of the shoulder, which keeps the edges of the straps from digging in or pinching. This roll-over also forms the hydration hose keeper and is an excellent example of the thoughtful design of this pack. The hip belt and sternum strap are removable, and we found that both function well. The hip belt is just barely wide enough to sit atop your iliac crest and take some weight, but for a more comfortable carry, look for the padded hipbelt of the Osprey Talon 22.

The Flash 22 hugs the back well  considering its minimal suspension.
The Flash 22 hugs the back well, considering its minimal suspension.

Ventilation makes for a comfortable pack, and the Flash 22 doesn't ventilate well. Packs with mesh backs like the Osprey Talon 22 or Osprey Stratos 34 ventilate much better. The small profile of the Flash 22 means that not much of your back will get sweaty, compared to wider packs like the REI Trail 25 or Black Diamond Street Creek 24.

The padded back panel doesn't allow for much ventilation  but at least prevents pointy objects from jabbing you in the back.
The padded back panel doesn't allow for much ventilation, but at least prevents pointy objects from jabbing you in the back.

The Flash 22 has no built in compression straps, unlike other similarly sized daypacks like the REI Co-op Trail 25 or Osprey Talon 22. However, it does have four perimeter loops around the back panel, two upper daisy chains, and one lower loop on each side of the back of the pack. These allow you to add cordage or straps for compression and carrying bulky items, if desired (see Ease of Use section, below, for an example). We loved all these loops for carrying things, but don't expect this pack to be able to compress down well.

Because the pack is so small, we didn't find the lack of compression to cause shifting or slipping during dynamic activities. However, with bulky loads, we did wish for some compression to bring the load closer in to our backs. We added a small bit of cordage to test this out and found that while it works for holding bulky objects, the pack doesn't have a stiff enough frame to compress without buckling. If you're looking for a pack you can cinch down tight to your back, check out the REI Trail 25, which has six compression straps to tighten down your load.

The foam back panel on the Flash 22 is removable closed cell foam, exactly like the REI Co-op Flash 18. We like this feature for using the pack as a sit pad.

Weight to Volume Ratio


The Flash 22 is an ultralight pack, with thin materials, small buckles and straps, and only the necessary features. It weighs in at a scant 13 ounces for its 23 L volume, for a weight to volume ratio of 0.54 oz/L, second only to the REI Co-op Flash 18 in our review.


It saves weight by allowing you to add on what you need with all the modular loops and daisy chains, but doesn't force you to carry unnecessary bells and whistles. For this price, we would normally expect a very simple pack with few features, but the Flash delivers lots of nice touches that don't add much weight.

We strapped a surprising amount of bulky gear to this pack without compromising its stability.
We strapped a surprising amount of bulky gear to this pack without compromising its stability.

Versatility


We used this pack for running, hiking, and even a trip to New Zealand. We appreciated its pocket design for all these activities, and its light weight and svelte size kept it out of our way when we didn't need it.


For outdoor pursuits, we could usually stuff this pack with all the layers, water bottles, and gear we needed. However, we hesitated to bring this pack snowshoeing, or when we had to carry gear for other people, as it quickly became uncomfortable with heavy loads. This limits it to activities like mountain biking, hiking, scrambling, trail running, climbing, and other generally fair-weather or light-and-fast adventures.

The Flash 22 performed well in our calisthenics testing. While this isn't real-world use for most people  it's a great standardized test of load-carrying stability.
The Flash 22 performed well in our calisthenics testing. While this isn't real-world use for most people, it's a great standardized test of load-carrying stability.

We appreciated the light and flexible frame on the Flash 22 for the freedom of motion it provided. It narrowly edged out the Editors' Choice Osprey Talon 22 in freedom of movement during our standardized calisthenics testing due to its thin and light shoulder straps. For biking or climbing, this pack stays out of the way and lets you do your thing.

We love the REI Co-op Flash series of packs for travel. The Flash 22 stuffs easily underneath an airplane seat, can be rolled up and stuffed in a carry on for more baggage-restricting airlines, and has two zippered pockets in addition to the main compartment for organization. We strapped it to a car headrest for a couple weeks of camping in New Zealand and used it as our day-to-day gear organizer and closet.

While the Flash 22 is versatile, it's not quite as high performance as packs like the Editors' Choice Osprey Talon 22, which is even more versatile, comfortable, and feature rich (albeit for double the price).

Ease of Use


Like the Editors' Choice REI Co-op Traverse 35, the REI Co-op Flash 22 benefits from years of design refinements to REI's pack lineup. The mesh stretch pockets are easy to get into and hold things well. The more secure zippered pockets are small, but work well for organizing small gear like headlamps or water filters. While it lacks the super-handy hip belt pockets of the Editors' Choice Osprey Talon 22, it's easy to slip this pack on and off to get to the zippered or mesh pockets.


The outer attachments on this pack and the Editors' Choice REI Co-op Traverse 35 were some of our favorite of the packs we tested. The elastic pole or ice axe holder securely held our 68 cm Petzl Glacier ice axe, but could also run through the loop of our nalgene and stretch over to one of the back panel loops, clipping in to secure a water bottle stuffed in the mesh side pocket. We liked these stretchy mesh side pockets better than similar ones on the Osprey Talon 22 and Osprey Stratos 34, but not quite as much as the cavernous stretch mesh pockets of the REI Trail 25 or REI Co-op Traverse 35.

The daisy chain and loop attachment points allowed us to add a bit of cordage to this pack to make carrying our photo tripod easier.
The daisy chain and loop attachment points allowed us to add a bit of cordage to this pack to make carrying our photo tripod easier.

Add Carry and Compression Cordage to the Flash 22
The outside attachment loops on the Flash 22 are similar to the REI Traverse 35, and can be outfitted with some useful cordage to add functionality for compressing the pack or strapping on bulky items like camera tripods. Here, we used a 30-inch long piece of 3mm cord, a small metal carabiner clip, and a cord lock to add a compression strap. We tied a bowline on one end, then girth hitched the strap to the lower, outside attachment loop. We then ran it through the metal carabiner clip and the cordlock, and tied a double overhand stopper knot to finish it off. We can run this through our gear, the daisy chains, and the other attachment loops on the pack to strap things down or tighten down the main compartment.

The daisy chain and attachment loops make it easy to add some compression cord to tie down bulky objects. Here  we use 30 in of 3mm cord  a cord lock  and a small metal carabiner clip to strap down our photo tripod. This whole setup is easy to attach  or remove if you don't need it.
The daisy chain and attachment loops make it easy to add some compression cord to tie down bulky objects. Here  we use 30 in of 3mm cord  a cord lock  and a small metal carabiner clip to strap down our photo tripod. This whole setup is easy to attach  or remove if you don't need it.


The main compartment is equipped for a hydration bladder up to 3L (although 3L of water takes up a lot of space in a pack this small). There are also two small pockets and a keychain clip on the hydration reservoir pocket. We liked these small pockets, but our larger testers had a hard time fitting their hands into them.

For commuting, we were able to slide our 14-inch laptop into the hydration sleeve easily, and we appreciated the two small zippered pockets for holding a notebook and pens. At crowded meetings, we could slip this bag under our chair, while other, bulkier bags just got in the way.

Durability



REI uses the same thin ripstop nylon on both the Flash 18 and Flash 22, with some thicker nylon packcloth on the bottom. The outer pocket creates two layers of material on the outside of the pack, and the lid adds another two layers to the top, making this pack able to take a little more abuse than the Flash 18.


Most other packs in this review use much burlier nylon that will probably last longer. The Black Diamond Street Creek 24 uses ballistic nylon fit for a haul bag, but that's almost certainly overkill for most day adventures. Unless you plan on canyoneering or hauling this bag over rock, it will last you years. And if you do tear it up, its simple design makes it easy to patch with some Tear-Aid or Tenacious Tape.

While all these packs let in water  the Flash 22 let in slightly less after six minutes of being sprayed with a hose due to having a lid to cover the opening to the main compartment. From L to R: REI Co-op Flash 18  REI Co-op Flash 22  Osprey Talon 22.
While all these packs let in water, the Flash 22 let in slightly less after six minutes of being sprayed with a hose due to having a lid to cover the opening to the main compartment. From L to R: REI Co-op Flash 18, REI Co-op Flash 22, Osprey Talon 22.

In our hose testing, we found that the top lid of the Flash 22 worked only slightly better than the Flash 18 at keeping out water. Without an included rain cover, and without the structured frame to support one, this pack is alright for short rainshowers, but will get your gear drenched in a long rainstorm. Think of it as being a pack that dries out very fast, and, as a top-loader, works great with a dry bag pack liner or garbage bag to keep your gear dry on a rainy day.

For a small daypack that will take a lot of abrasion abuse, check out the REI Trail 25, which is made of uniformly thicker nylon than the Flash 22. If your typical use for this pack mainly involves on-trail hiking or mountain biking, this pack is plenty durable, and you will likely find that the material will delaminate from UV exposure long before it becomes unusable from abrasion.

Best Applications


The Flash 22 is well suited for most light-and-fast adventures. We reach for it first when multi-pitch climbing, mountain biking, hiking, and especially trail running. While we prefer more structured and padded bags, like the Black Diamond Street Creek 24 or REI Trail 25 for commuting, this bag works great in a pinch, especially when we need to travel for work and want to get a long run or hike in on the side.

The Flash 22 is best suited for light and fast activities  but has the versatility to carry all sorts of gear and comfortably fit most sizes of torsos.
The Flash 22 is best suited for light and fast activities, but has the versatility to carry all sorts of gear and comfortably fit most sizes of torsos.

Value


We were blown away by the performance of this pack given its low price. After many years, REI has really dialed in the design and feature set, and we can honestly say that we hope it doesn't change much. At an ultralight weight, it delivers top-tier performance, features that we find ourselves using frequently, and the versatility to accompany day after day in the mountains. At $55, all these positive characteristics come at an absolute steal, making this a solid choice for our Best Buy award.

If you think the features on this bag are excessive and want the lightest, cheapest, and simplest bag we tested, check out the REI Flash 18. For a higher performance, similarly dialed-in bag, our Editor's Choice Osprey Talon 22 is a stellar pack, but it comes at double the cost of the Flash 22

Conclusion


Our 2019 Best Buy award winner performs well in all metrics other than durability, and at a lower price that the vast majority of packs in our review. After years of refinement, the Flash 22 offers functional and streamlined features, a remarkably comfortable suspension considering its minimalism, and a useful design, all at a crazy light weight.

While very light  this pack also has some nice features like an ice axe loop  stretch mesh side pockets  and loops to attach cordage for more carry options.
While very light, this pack also has some nice features like an ice axe loop, stretch mesh side pockets, and loops to attach cordage for more carry options.


Dan Scott