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Blizzard Sheeva 10 Review

While it's fun in fresh snow and better than expected on-piste, this ski doesn't stack up against the review's tough competition
Blizzard Sheeva 10
Photo: Blizzard
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Price:  $650 List | $649.95 at REI
Compare prices at 3 resellers
Pros:  Solid powder performer, better on hardpack than expected, stable underfoot
Cons:  Not great in crud, tip flap, not stable along the whole length of the ski
Manufacturer:   Blizzard
By Renee McCormack ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Oct 22, 2021
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58
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#9 of 13
  • Stability at Speed - 20% 6
  • Carving Ability - 20% 6
  • Powder Performance - 20% 7
  • Crud Performance - 20% 5
  • Terrain Playfulness - 15% 5
  • Bumps - 5% 4

Our Verdict

The Blizzard Sheeva 10 does a wide variety of things with a degree of competency, but doesn't necessarily stand out in any particular domain. Our expectations were also perhaps too high for this ski; one tester is a little obsessed with her pair of Black Pearl skis, and she imagined the Sheeva would be similar but fatter and better in powder. Unfortunately, the Sheeva is not as dependable as the Black Pearl in many metrics, and while it does float well in powder, it's not as sensational there as we'd hoped from the 102 millimeters underfoot. There is also a constant tendency towards tip-flapping that we found disconcerting.

The latest graphics for the Sheeva 10 are pictured above. The ski's shape and specifications are the same as what we tested.
October 2021

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Blizzard Sheeva 10
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Blizzard Sheeva 10
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Overall Score Sort Icon
58
77
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71
Star Rating
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Pros Solid powder performer, better on hardpack than expected, stable underfootCrud blaster, dependable, great one-ski quiver option, good for every ability levelAwesome powder tool, fabulous fun factor even for light skiers, affordable priceGreat stability at high speeds, good on hard snow and crud, more affordable than othersSuperbly stable at high speeds, great edge hold
Cons Not great in crud, tip flap, not stable along the whole length of the skiNo wow-factor, not a lot of reboundGets bouncy in crud, slight tip flap, doesn’t carve perfectlyOnly for shallower pow days, needs strong skier to guide themToo burly for lighter gals, not nimble
Bottom Line While it's fun in fresh snow and better than expected on-piste, this ski doesn't stack up against the review's tough competitionA great all-rounder ski that we think is the most versatile option for a one-ski quiverA fun and responsive toy for powder days, groomer antics, and bumps, with a value-oriented price tagThis model will do great in everything but the deepest powder and is ideal for an aggressive skierA good choice for hard-charging speed demons that still performs decently off-piste
Rating Categories Blizzard Sheeva 10 Nordica Santa Ana 98 Elan Ripstick 94 W Faction Dictator 2.0X Volkl Secret 96
Stability At Speed (20%)
6.0
8.0
7.0
9.0
9.0
Carving Ability (20%)
6.0
8.0
7.0
8.0
7.0
Powder Performance (20%)
7.0
7.0
9.0
5.0
7.0
Crud Performance (20%)
5.0
9.0
5.0
9.0
7.0
Terrain Playfulness (15%)
5.0
6.0
9.0
6.0
6.0
Bumps (5%)
4.0
7.0
8.0
5.0
3.0
Specs Blizzard Sheeva 10 Nordica Santa Ana 98 Elan Ripstick 94 W Faction Dictator 2.0X Volkl Secret 96
Waist Width (mm) 102 98 96 96 96
Shape (Tip-Waist-Tail) (mm) 132-102-122 132-98-120 136-96-111 127-96-117 135-96-119
Available Lengths (cm) 156, 164, 172, 180 151, 158, 165, 172, 179 154, 162, 170, 178 155, 163, 171, 175, 179, 183, 187 149, 156, 163, 170
Length Tested (cm) 172 172 178 171 170
Radius (m) 16 16.3 16.2 18 27-16-22
Rocker Style Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, cambered inside edge Amphibio tech Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, camber underfoot
Weight Per Pair (lbs) 7.0 8.1 7.4 7.9 8.5
Construction Type Sandwich compound sidewall Energy Ti W SST sidewall Sandwich Full sidewall
Core Material Poplar, beech, balsa, paulownia Performance Wood & Metal Tubelite wood Paulownia & Poplar Beech and poplar
Intended Purpose All-Mountain, Big Mountain All-Mountain All-Mountain All-Mountain, Big Mountain All-Mountain
Ability Level Advanced-Expert Expert Intermediate-Advanced Advanced-Expert Advanced-Expert

Our Analysis and Test Results

We felt that Blizzard's Carbon Flipcore DRT technology, which attempts to strengthen the area of the ski underfoot while "reducing the torsional strength of the tip and tail," had pretty much exactly that effect. The part of the ski under our foot felt quite solid and stable, but the lightened tips and tails (done in hopes of better powder flotation and greater ease of turning) felt insecure and frenetic. Unfortunately, this ski's buoyancy didn't seem to be enhanced enough for the sacrifice in stability.

Performance Comparison


This Blizzard ski was fun on a powder day, keeping us afloat with...
This Blizzard ski was fun on a powder day, keeping us afloat with its 102-millimeter waist.
Photo: Nate Greenberg

Stability at Speed


You can see the tips flapping on the Sheeva 10 from a mile away when you get it moving at higher speeds. However, there is definitely a certain steadiness immediately underneath your feet. Alas, the front third of the ski dancing around like a frog in a blender makes it uncomfortable at very high speeds. The edge hold capabilities are somewhere in the middle of our test group.

We felt and saw the tips of the Sheeva flapping wildly when we...
We felt and saw the tips of the Sheeva flapping wildly when we pushed the speed, but its edge-hold underfoot on hard-pack was decent.
Photo: Nate Greenberg

Carving Ability


Once again, the stability the Sheeva displays underfoot makes it fun for carving, if you can ignore the flappity-flop of the tips. It skis a little shorter than many others in our test and also feels surprisingly quick for its large size. The edge-to-edge agility is impressive for something as wide as 102mm underfoot. The 16m turn radius is unusual for a ski of this width, and it provides a zippy carve when laid on edge.

The center of the ski, under foot, likes to hold the edge and carve...
The center of the ski, under foot, likes to hold the edge and carve, but the tips and tails get a little loosey goosey.
Photo: Nate Greenberg

Powder Performance


The Blizzard Sheeva 10 is a floaty, fun ski in the powder, but it didn't blow us away in this metric as we'd hoped from a fat ski. "It did the job," said one tester but didn't do it spectacularly. This ski was solid and reliable in the fresh snow but didn't inspire us to stick with this model until the last chair.

Powder is where this ski has the most fun.
Powder is where this ski has the most fun.
Photo: Nate Greenberg

Crud Performance


We'd had hopes that the Sheeva would be a goddess powerful enough to bulldoze the chop, but in fact, it gave us a pretty bouncy ride and felt very limp and feeble towards the front of the ski.

The big tips tend to get deflected in the choppy snow, and they...
The big tips tend to get deflected in the choppy snow, and they don't feel strong enough to push the chunks out of their way.
Photo: Nate Greenberg

Terrain Playfulness


While the Sheeva 10 is more playful than expected from such a bulky shape, we still didn't find the responsiveness and rebound we were looking for in this ski.

Bumps


The strength this ski provides underfoot makes it ski fairly well in the bumps, despite its behemoth form. It is more spry than anticipated from its size and can move rapidly through the moguls when prodded.

Value


This ski can be found towards the middle to the lower end of the price range within our test group, and we think it's a reasonable value for the price and performance. However, there are other higher-scoring skis we tested in a similar price range that may suit most skiers a bit better.

Conclusion


The Blizzard Sheeva 10 is a jack of all trades but master of none. While it was fun in fresh, soft snow, it struggled in other areas and wasn't as versatile in variable conditions as other models.

While we got a kick out of the Sheeva in fresh snow, it wasn't...
While we got a kick out of the Sheeva in fresh snow, it wasn't versatile enough to be ranked higher.
Photo: Nate Greenberg

Renee McCormack

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