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Icelantic Riveter 95 - Women's Review

A fun ski that likes to pivot and get airborne, but lacks high-speed stability, especially for larger women
Icelantic Riveter 95 - Women's
Photo: Icelantic
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Price:  $679 List | $679.00 at REI
Compare prices at 2 resellers
Pros:  Very lively, makes pivoted tight turns, twin tips, beautiful artwork
Cons:  Not built for taller women
Manufacturer:   Icelantic
By Renee McCormack ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Dec 23, 2020
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63
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#5 of 13
  • Stability at Speed - 20% 4
  • Carving Ability - 20% 6
  • Powder Performance - 20% 7
  • Crud Performance - 20% 6
  • Terrain Playfulness - 15% 8
  • Bumps - 5% 9

Our Verdict

Our testers were pleasantly surprised by this ski's playful performance, and they loved taking it into the trees, moguls, and the terrain park. Unfortunately, some of our testers are taller women, and they were disappointed that the longest version of this ski is only 169 centimeters. Given the vast amount of tip rocker, we wouldn't recommend this ski to anyone over about 5 feet, 7 inches tall. We'd recommend this ski to girls who want to play in the park and take the same ski all over the mountain, but not to those who mostly like to go fast on groomed runs.

Icelantic updated the topsheet graphics (shown above) since we last tested this ski, but the specs and performance are the same.
October 2021

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Star Rating
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Pros Very lively, makes pivoted tight turns, twin tips, beautiful artworkCrud blaster, dependable, great one-ski quiver option, good for every ability levelAwesome powder tool, fabulous fun factor even for light skiers, affordable priceGreat stability at high speeds, good on hard snow and crud, more affordable than othersSuperbly stable at high speeds, great edge hold
Cons Not built for taller womenNo wow-factor, not a lot of reboundGets bouncy in crud, slight tip flap, doesn’t carve perfectlyOnly for shallower pow days, needs strong skier to guide themToo burly for lighter gals, not nimble
Bottom Line A fun ski that likes to pivot and get airborne, but lacks high-speed stability, especially for larger womenA great all-rounder ski that we think is the most versatile option for a one-ski quiverA fun and responsive toy for powder days, groomer antics, and bumps, with a value-oriented price tagThis model will do great in everything but the deepest powder and is ideal for an aggressive skierA good choice for hard-charging speed demons that still performs decently off-piste
Rating Categories Icelantic Riveter 95 Nordica Santa Ana 98 Elan Ripstick 94 W Faction Dictator 2.0X Volkl Secret 96
Stability At Speed (20%)
4.0
8.0
7.0
9.0
9.0
Carving Ability (20%)
6.0
8.0
7.0
8.0
7.0
Powder Performance (20%)
7.0
7.0
9.0
5.0
7.0
Crud Performance (20%)
6.0
9.0
5.0
9.0
7.0
Terrain Playfulness (15%)
8.0
6.0
9.0
6.0
6.0
Bumps (5%)
9.0
7.0
8.0
5.0
3.0
Specs Icelantic Riveter 95 Nordica Santa Ana 98 Elan Ripstick 94 W Faction Dictator 2.0X Volkl Secret 96
Waist Width (mm) 95 98 96 96 96
Shape (Tip-Waist-Tail) (mm) 130-95-117 132-98-120 136-96-111 127-96-117 135-96-119
Available Lengths (cm) 155, 162, 169 151, 158, 165, 172, 179 154, 162, 170, 178 155, 163, 171, 175, 179, 183, 187 149, 156, 163, 170
Length Tested (cm) 169 172 178 171 170
Radius (m) 16 16.3 16.2 18 27-16-22
Rocker Style Tip and tail rocker, camber underfoot Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, cambered inside edge Amphibio tech Tip and tail, camber underfoot Tip and tail, camber underfoot
Weight Per Pair (lbs) 7.3 8.1 7.4 7.9 8.5
Construction Type Durasurf 2001 P-Tex sidewall Energy Ti W SST sidewall Sandwich Full sidewall
Core Material Poplar Performance Wood & Metal Tubelite wood Paulownia & Poplar Beech and poplar
Intended Purpose All-Mountain All-Mountain All-Mountain All-Mountain, Big Mountain All-Mountain
Ability Level Intermediate-Advanced Expert Intermediate-Advanced Advanced-Expert Advanced-Expert

Our Analysis and Test Results

The GearLab test crew agreed this ski should be called "The Pivoter" instead of the Riveter, for its uncanny ability to make a flat-footed twist. We loved taking the Riveter in the bumps and trees since it can pivot on a dime and seems to prefer a much tighter turn radius than its specs would implicate. The stunning mountain graphics were icing on the topsheet for this lightweight, springy ski.

Performance Comparison


Completely at home in both mogul fields and tight tree lines, we...
Completely at home in both mogul fields and tight tree lines, we loved taking this ski anywhere where agility was paramount.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Stability at Speed


For a smaller, lighter skier, the Riveter might provide a moderately stable ride at speed. However, for our testers, who are taller and heavier, it did not offer the solid platform we wanted when pushing our speed limits. The Riveter did hold an edge better than we anticipated, but again for our larger testers, the "usable edge" (the part of the ski which actually grips the snow between rockered tails and rockered tips) was simply too short to feel confident.

We could only go so fast on this ski without feeling a bit unstable.
We could only go so fast on this ski without feeling a bit unstable.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Carving Ability


We enjoyed carving the Riveter so more than we thought we would - partially because it holds an edge better than most skis with a similar softer flex, and partially because the turn radius was much tighter than the 16 meters the manufacturer claims. Our testers found that the ski moved rapidly from edge to edge, in part due to its abundant rebound of 5 millimeters camber underfoot. The Riveter truly springs from one short carved arc to the next. Our testers all agreed that it feels more like a 14-meter radius in the 169-centimeter length (as opposed to the printed 16 meters), giving it a very lively sensation. Because it is quite soft, even a small lightweight skier should be able to bend this ski, arc a clean carve, and feel it bounce back afterward.

The solid edge-hold surprised us for such a relatively soft ski, and...
The solid edge-hold surprised us for such a relatively soft ski, and it made a much tighter turn than its specs would suggest.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Powder Performance


The Riveter did not impress us as much as we hoped in fresh snow. We believe this to likely be a function of the lack of length, combined with the copious rocker, creating the sensation of a shorter ski that tends to nose-dive in deeper powder. Even our smallest tester, who generally skis a powder ski in the 170cm range, felt there was not enough tip on the front of this ski to maintain consistent floatation. In half a foot or less, it performed well, staying on top and showing us the same lively, smeary personality we loved about it elsewhere. When it got deeper, however, the tips started to dive underneath, making everything feel more laborious and less fun. Our testers believe that if they made this ski in a longer length, many women would find it to be a quality powder ski.

The Riveter's tips stayed afloat well in powder; we just wish they...
The Riveter's tips stayed afloat well in powder; we just wish they made it in a longer length for those deeper days.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Crud Performance


The Riveter surprised us again in this metric. Despite having a softer construction, which might often account for deflection and inability to push through chunkier terrain, the Riveter handled rough terrain like a champion. One tester considered whether its softness actually helped dampen the bumpy ride; it felt like the ski absorbed some of the jolts rather than transferring those to your body to deal with. It doesn't plow or slice through the chop like some of our highly rated crud skis but attacks it in a completely different way. It felt as though even when the Riveter was bounced off course by an unforeseen chunk, it took it in stride and pretended it wanted to be bouncing in that direction. This ski is so quick, agile, and easy to maneuver that it doesn't take much effort to get it back on track, even when it goes astray.

This ski just laughs its way over the chop, gaily bouncing wherever...
This ski just laughs its way over the chop, gaily bouncing wherever its sent and somehow making it feel purposeful.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Terrain Playfulness


Thanks in part to its lightweight construction, the Riveter is incredibly easy to get airborne. The ski's nimbleness inspired our testers to try some spins, where the Riveter felt very maneuverable, and landing switch on the twin tips felt smooth and secure. The rebound and tighter-than-stated turn radius made simple short turns on groomers feel fun. "Poppy, but not too floppy" was the appreciative expression of one tester.

We loved flying on this ski.
We loved flying on this ski.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Bumps


The ability of the Riveter to pivot quickly and accurately made for some very fun mogul skiing. The abundant tip rocker allowed us to turn rapidly, but the tail is still stiff enough to snap you into the transition to the next turn. We felt confident enough in its abilities that we could choose the zipper-line or the mellow surf line and enjoyed them both on this ski.

Quick and agile, with a penchant for buttery pivots, this ski was a...
Quick and agile, with a penchant for buttery pivots, this ski was a riot in the moguls.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Value


The Icelantic Riveter 95 has an average price tag for an average ski. One of our ski tuners mentioned that the quality of steel in the edges might be slightly subpar, and may accept fewer tunes throughout its life than other skis with higher quality metal. If you prefer to shop American-made or want to dress up your ski-look with these absolutely gorgeous top-sheets, then the Riveter might provide added value there.

The graphics coming from this Colorado-based company have always...
The graphics coming from this Colorado-based company have always been stunning, and this ski is no exception.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Conclusion


We would recommend this ski to ladies who enjoy something a little lighter and more agile and don't mind sacrificing some heft and stability. This would be an excellent ski for someone looking to get a little jibby in the park, but who also wants to tour the whole mountain at times. It could also function well as a lighter-weight backcountry ski. However, until Icelantic starts making their women's skis in a longer length (and us tall gals really hope they do), we cannot recommend this ski to anyone over about 5 feet, 7 inches in height.

We were often seen smiling while on this fun, pivoty ski.
We were often seen smiling while on this fun, pivoty ski.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Renee McCormack

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