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The Best Trail Mountain Bikes of 2019

Sunday June 2, 2019
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Are you looking for a new trail mountain bike? At OutdoorGearLab we want to help you find the right bike for you, your trails, your riding style, and your wallet. We researched all of the most interesting bikes of 2019 and our team of testers spent hundreds of hours and rode thousands of miles on these trail bikes. We put each bike through its paces in an effort to gain a complete and thorough understanding of each bike's performance. Some ride characteristics are obvious immediately while some of the subtleties take hundreds of miles to pick up on. Rest assured, this is the most complete review on the internet.


Top 24 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 24
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Awards Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award   
Price $5,099.00 at Competitive Cyclist$6,480.00 at Competitive Cyclist$4,899 List$3,919.00 at Competitive Cyclist$5,199.00 at Competitive Cyclist
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Pros Excellent climber, aggressive geometry, rim/tire combinationExcellent climbing abilities, impressive downhill performance, high fun factor, tremendous build kitLightweight, playful, well-rounded, modern geometry, solid component specificationExtremely well-rounded performance, confident and predictable descending, superb climbing abilitiesExcellent downhill performance, re-worked suspension layout pays dividends, respectable climber
Cons Expensive, big impacts are less supportive, handlebars have too much backsweepExpensive, pivots came loose a few times during testingNot a brawler, Fox 34 fork can be overwhelmedNot the most aggressive long-travel 29er, spendyToo long to be playful, no climb switch on RockShox Super Deluxe
Bottom Line An aggressive 29er with geometry to get rad while retaining a sporty and nimble feelA fantastic trail bike that blends superb climbing abilities with fun and well-rounded downhill performance.We loved the old version, but believe it or not, the new Ibis Ripley is even better.A well-rounded enduro shredder that can serve as an excellent daily driver.The Bronson is a ripping descender that is still capable of significant amounts of climbing.
Rating Categories Ibis Ripmo GX Yeti SB130 TURQ X01 Ibis Ripley GX Eagle Santa Cruz Hightower LT XE Santa Cruz Bronson Carbon S
Fun Factor (25%)
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8
Downhill Performance (35%)
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Climbing Performance (35%)
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Specs Ibis Ripmo GX Yeti SB130 TURQ X01 Ibis Ripley GX Eagle Santa Cruz... Santa Cruz Bronson...
Wheel size 29" 29" 29" 29" 27.5"
Suspension & Travel DW-Link - 145mm Switch Infinity - 130mm DW-Link - 120mm Virtual Pivot Point (VPP) - 150mm Virtual Pivot Point (VPP) - 150mm
Measured Weight (w/o pedals) 29 lbs 7 oz (Large) 29 lbs 9 oz (Large) 28 lbs 14 oz (Large) 30 lbs 2 oz (Large) 30 lbs 13 oz
Fork Fox 36 Performance - 160mm, 36mm stanchions Fox 36 Factory - 150mm 36mm stanchions Fox Float 34 Performance 130mm 34mm stanchions Fox 36 Performance Elite - 150mm, 36mm stanchions RockShox Lyrik Select+ 160mm
Shock Fox DPX2 Performance Elite Fox DPX2 Factory Fox Float Performance DPS EVOL Fox DPX2 Performance Elite RockShox Super Deluxe Select+
Frame Material Carbon Fiber Carbon Fiber "TURQ" Carbon Fiber Carbon Fiber "C" Carbon Fiber "C"
Frame Size Large Large Large Large Large
Frame Settings N/A N/A N/A N/A Flip Chip
Available Sizes S-XL S-XL S-XL S-XXL XS-XL
Wheelset Ibis 938 Aluminum Rims 34mm ID w/ Ibis Hubs DT Swiss M1700, 30mm ID w/ DT Swiss 350 hub Ibis 938 Aluminum Rims 34mm ID w/ Ibis Hubs E*Thirteen TRS+ Rims 29mm ID w/ Novatec Hubs Race Face AR Offset 30 with DT 370 hubs
Front Tire Maxxis Minion DHF WT 29 x 2.5" Maxxis Minion DHF WT 29 x 2.5" Schwable Hans Dampf 2.6" Maxxis Minion DHR II 29 x 2.4" Maxxis Minion DHF EXO TR 2.5"
Rear Tire Maxxis Aggressor WT 29 x 2.5" Maxxis Aggressor 29 x 2.3 Schwalbe Nobby Nic 2.6" Maxxis Minion DHR II 29 x 2.4" Maxxis Minion DHR II EXO TR 2.4"
Shifters SRAM GX Eagle SRAM XO Eagle SRAM GX Eagle Shimano XT SRAM GX Eagle
Rear Derailleur SRAM GX Eagle 12-Speed SRAM X0 Eagle SRAM GX Eagle Shimano XT 11-Speed SRAM GX Eagle
Crankset SRAM Descendant 30t SRAM X0 Eagle Carbon 30T SRAM Descendant Alloy 32T RaceFace Turbine 30t SRAM Stylo 7K 148 DUB 175mm 32T
Saddle WTB Silverado WTB Volt WTB Silverado 142mm WTB Silverado Pro WTB Silverado Pro
Seatpost KS LEV-SI-150mm Fox Transfer 150mm Bike Yoke Revive 160mm RockShox Reverb Stealth - 150mm RockShox Reverb Stealth 170mm
Handlebar Ibis Aluminum Bar - 780mm Yeti Carbon - 780mm Ibis 780mm Alloy Santa Cruz Carbon - 800mm Race Face Aeffect R 780mm
Stem Ibis 3D Forged Stem 50mm w/ 31.8mm Clamp RaceFace Aeffect R 35 Ibis 31.8mm 50mm RaceFace Aeffect R 50mm Race Face Aeffect R 50mm
Brakes Shimano Deore XT Shimano XT M8000 Shimano Deore 2 Piston Shimano XT M8000 SRAM Code R
Measured Effective Top Tube (mm) 628 628 625 631 625
Measured Reach (mm) 473 477 475 460
Measured Head Tube Angle 65.8-degrees 65.1-degrees 66.5-degrees 66.0-degrees 65.3-degrees H / 65.0-degrees L
Measured Seat Tube Angle 76.1-degrees 76.8-degrees 76.2-degrees 71.1-degrees 75.1-degrees H / 74.8-degrees L
Measured Bottom Bracket Height (mm) 343 335 338 342 H / 339 L
Measured Wheelbase (mm) 1220 1231 1210 1197 1215
Measured Chain Stay Length (mm) 436 438 434 444 432
Warranty Seven Years Lifetime Seven Years Lifetime Lifetime

Best Trail Bike


Yeti SB130 TURQ X01 2019


Editors' Choice Award

$6,480.00
(10% off)
at Competitive Cyclist
See It

86
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Fun Factor - 25% 9
  • Downhill Performance - 35% 8
  • Climbing Performance - 35% 9
  • Ease of Maintenance - 5% 7
Wheel Size: 29 | Rear Travel: 130mm
Top-notch climbing efficiency and traction
Fun and capable downhill performance on a huge range of terrain
Expensive
Despite aggressive angles and meaty fork, needs to be finessed a bit on rowdy terrain

The Yeti SB130 is a ripping trail bike that may just be the ultimate daily driver. This bicycle makes a ton of sense for a huge number of riders on a wide range of terrain. The Yeti sets you up in an excellent climbing position and delivers a feathery and efficient uphill experience. The Switch Infinity suspension beautifully balances excellent traction with a calm and relatively bob-free pedal platform. On the descent, this bike is a blast on a very diverse range of terrain. On fast and buff flow trails this bike delivers excellent stability, sharp handling, and berm-railing cornering skills. On rougher trails, the SB130 charges hard down anything but true enduro-grade terrain. The Yeti is fun on a tremendously wide-range of terrain. It is burly enough to hang on some gnar and tight and efficient enough to still be a blast on mellow and tame trails. This is a very high compliment. All of this performance is going to cost you.

Read Review: Yeti SB130 TURQ X01 2019

Best Quiver Killer


Ibis Ripmo GX 2018


Editors' Choice Award

$5,099.00
at Competitive Cyclist
See It

86
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Fun Factor - 25% 9
  • Downhill Performance - 35% 9
  • Climbing Performance - 35% 8
  • Ease of Maintenance - 5% 7
Wheel Size: 29 in | Rear Travel: 145mm
Fantastic climbing abilities
Sporty rear end
Not quite as confident in big terrain as other bikes
The front end can feel bulky in mellow terrain

The all-new Ibis Ripmo is a dialed aggressive trail mountain bike. This rig pairs a burly and confidence inspiring front end with a lively and efficient rear end. This bicycle features 145mm of rear wheel travel and is designed around a 160mm fork. Despite its aggressive attitude, the Ripmo is a very efficient climber. The DW-link suspension functions well under seated or standing pedaling loads but is active enough to maintain traction. On the descent, this bike has the aggressive angles to be confident down gnarly terrain. The Ripmo remains impressively calm over small to mid-size chatter. At times, you need a reminder that this bike only has 145mm of travel and it can be overwhelmed on gnarly trails. The Ripmo model we tested is reasonably priced, and it is offered in a variety of build kits to suit a range of budgets.

Read Review: Ibis Ripmo GX 2018

Best Short Travel Trail Bike


Ibis Ripley GX Eagle 2019


Editors' Choice Award

$4,899 List
List Price
See It

82
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Fun Factor - 25% 9
  • Downhill Performance - 35% 7
  • Climbing Performance - 35% 9
  • Ease of Maintenance - 5% 7
Wheel Size: 29 | Rear Travel: 120mm
Lightweight
Playful
Well-rounded
Solid component specification
Still not a brawler
Fox 34 fork can be overwhelmed

The 2019 Ibis Ripley has undergone a complete overhaul. Other than keeping the same travel as the previous version, 120mm in the rear and 130mm in the front, the new Ripley is a brand new design. Building on the success of the longer travel Ripmo, Ibis took many of the design features of that bike and applied them in this shorter travel package. The reach and wheelbase have been extended significantly, the head tube slackened, and the seat tube steepened to bring the Ripley's geometry up to date. The result is a much more well-rounded bike that climbs better and descends with far more confidence. It still maintains much of its lively and playful trail manners, though that is no longer its defining characteristic. This versatile short travel ride scampers uphill and charges back down, it's only limited by its travel length. If you're looking for a short travel trail bike that can do it all, check out the new and improved Ripley.

Read Review: Ibis Ripley GX 2019

Best Value Short-Travel Trail Bike


Giant Trance 29 2 2019


Best Buy Award

$3,100 List
List Price
See It

76
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Fun Factor - 25% 8
  • Downhill Performance - 35% 8
  • Climbing Performance - 35% 7
  • Ease of Maintenance - 5% 6
Wheel Size: 29 | Rear Travel: 115mm
Punches above weight class
High fun-factor
Practical bike for most riders
Reasonably priced
Low-end build kit
Need to remove shock's volume spacer for optimal performance

Giant's new Trance 29 2 is an affordable short travel trail bike that is practical for a broad range of riders and terrain. This bike is playful and agile and boasts a high fun-factor. It feels efficient with excellent climbing abilities despite its 31-pound weight and is plenty capable for any length ride. Downhill performance is composed and impressive, especially considering its short 115mm of rear wheel travel. Handling is quick and precise and it excels in technical terrain and rips corners with the best of them. This is a great bike for the rider who appreciates solid climbing abilities and wants a moderately aggressive geometry and prefers the liveliness of a shorter travel bike. Our test model is also an impressive value with a rip-able build, although there are several other builds available for anyone looking to go a little more high-end.

Read Review: Giant Trance 29 2 2019

Best User-Friendly All-Around Trail Bike


Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 29 2019


Top Pick Award

$4,200 List
List Price
See It

76
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Fun Factor - 25% 8
  • Downhill Performance - 35% 8
  • Climbing Performance - 35% 7
  • Ease of Maintenance - 5% 7
Wheel Size: 29 | Rear Travel: 140mm
Doesn't require high speeds or ultra-skilled rider to be fun
Extremely well-rounded performance
Relies on climb switch
A couple of questionable components

The Specialized Stumpjumper is a 140mm travel 29er that is fun for everyone. There are some high-end bikes that require a very aggressive rider to come alive. The Stumpjumper is a more user-friendly option and is a great choice for a huge number of riders. Downhill performance is confident and reliable while climbing is efficient and comfortable. Handling is reasonably sharp and this bike reacts with minimal rider input. This well-rounded bike has no fatal flaw and makes sense for a tremendous amount of riders. Pricing is competitive with affordable aluminum builds and high-end carbon models offered.

Read Review: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 29

Best Value All-Around Trail Bike


Commencal Meta TR 29 2019


Top Pick Award

$3,599 List
List Price
See It

75
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Fun Factor - 25% 8
  • Downhill Performance - 35% 8
  • Climbing Performance - 35% 7
  • Ease of Maintenance - 5% 5
Wheel Size: 29 | Rear Travel: 130mm
Downhill shredder
Stout and tough frame
Steep seat tube angle
NX Eagle drivetrain
Semi-slick rear tire
Heavy

Commencal has had great success with their Meta TR series of bikes and the Meta TR 29 is the new 29" wheeled version of this popular trail bike. We loved the 27.5" models of this bike and were equally impressed with the performance of this affordable mid-travel 29er. Despite its heavier weight, we were impressed by its uphill abilities thanks to its steep seat tube angle and comfortable seated climbing position. It's downhill performance is excellent, and it descends with far more confidence than its 130mm of travel might suggest. We feel this is an excellent option for the aggressive trail rider who doesn't mind trading a little extra weight for durable frame design and downhill chops. We also feel that it's a great value, with a shred-ready build and a reasonable price.

Read Review: Commencal Meta TR 29 2019

Best Trail Bike Under 2500


YT Jeffsy AL Base 2019


The builds on bikes in this price range are steadily improving as technology trickles down. Consumer direct brands like YT also have amazing builds for the price like that on the Jeffsy AL Base pictured here.
Editors' Choice Award

$2,299 List
List Price
See It

75
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Fun Factor - 25% 8
  • Downhill Performance - 35% 8
  • Climbing Performance - 35% 7
  • Ease of Maintenance - 5% 5
Wheel Size: 29 | Rear Travel: 140mm
Versatile
Solid all-around performance
Excellent component spec for the price
Very reasonably priced
Moderately heavy

The YT Jeffsy AL Base has been redesigned for 2019 and has an outstanding all-around performance that earned it our Editor's Choice Award for a mountain bike under $2500. We feel this bike represents the best value in a trail bike that you're going to find, and it is trail worthy straight out of the box. YT's consumer direct sales model allows them to deliver a price to build kit ratio that most other brands can't compete with. The impressive build of the Jeffsy AL Base is one reason it performs so well on the trail. It also has a modern, but not too extreme, geometry that gives it a well-rounded performance that shines in virtually all aspects of riding. It's a comfortable and adept climber and a versatile descender that handles any terrain that comes your way with composure well beyond the asking price. Our biggest gripe with the Jeffsy AL Base is its moderately heavy weight, beyond that, we feel you'd be hard pressed to find a better all-around trail bike at this price.

Read Review: YT Jeffsy AL Base 2019

Best Women's Trail Bike


Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 27.5 12-Speed - Women's


Editors' Choice Award

$4,520 List
List Price
See It

Wheel Size: 27.5 | Rear Travel: 150mm
Aggressive descender
Modern progressive geometry
Excellent stability at speed
Surprisingly user-friendly
Some underwhelming aspects of the build
Moderately heavy

The Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon Women's impressed our tester's with its seemingly mythical ability to do everything well. This carbon-framed bike has the travel and progressive geometry to charge as hard as you want on the descents, yet it also has a high level of user-friendliness and doesn't require a professional skill level to enjoy. The 150mm of front and rear wheel travel combine with the Stumpy's relaxed geometry to provide unflinching stability at speed, a smooth and supportive ride, and big-hit capabilities that the other women's models we tested can't compete with. Despite the longer travel and slacker geometry, it maintains a high degree of maneuverability and responsive handling, with excellent traction and cornering abilities at lower speeds in mellower terrain. Specialized's FSR suspension platform provides a supportive pedaling platform and the Stumpjumper scrambles uphill with a comfortable climbing position and serviceable component specification including a 12-speed drivetrain and girthy 2.6" tires. This bike's well-rounded trail manners, user-friendliness, and downhill capabilities made it a tester favorite and we've awarded it our Editor's Choice Award for the best overall women's trail bike.

Read Review: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 27.5 12-Speed - Women's

Best Hardtail Trail Bike


Specialized Fuse Expert 29 2020


Editors' Choice Award

$2,150 List
List Price
See It

Wheel Size: 29" | Front Travel: 130mm
Excellent all-around performance
Confident descender
Dialed modern geometry
No chainstay protection
Mediocre fork specification

The Specialized Fuse Expert 29 is a new model for 2020 and features an updated frame design and 29-inch wheels. Previous Fuse models have been tester favorites and the new version easily took the top spot as our favorite hardtail. This new model has a more progressive modern geometry that is longer and slacker than the old model but remains conservative enough that it performs well in virtually every situation. This bike charges downhill, devours flow trails, and had our testers grinning from ear to ear after every test ride. It might not be an XC race bike, but it still climbs very efficiently and effectively given its nearly 30 lb weight. Not to mention the fact that it looks pretty slick with its brushed aluminum finish and subtle purple lettering. We think it's also a solid value with a component specification that is ready for anything you are. If you're looking for a do-it-all trail hardtail, look no further.

Read Review: Specialized Fuse Expert 29 2020


Out for some comparison testing on the local trails
Out for some comparison testing on the local trails

Why You Should Trust Us


Our team of testers has spent years relentlessly hammering these mountain bicycles around the Sierra Nevada mountains in every condition imaginable. We don't simply ride our bikes for a week or two and then move on. No, these bikes are passed around between riders for months on end and are tested for hundreds of miles each.

Our trusty testers are salty bike industry veterans, shop mechanics, racers, and gravity fiends. These testers eat, breathe, and sleep mountain bikes and always push these bi-wheeled fun machines to the limit.

Our Senior Mountain Bike Review Editor, Jeremy Benson has been riding mountain bikes since the early 1990s. This east coast native moved to North Lake Tahoe in 2001 and has been obsessively riding the area trails ever since. Benson is a competitive gravel and mountain bike racer and spends more time in the saddle than most; logging over 5,000 miles and 600,000 vertical feet in 2018. He is also especially tough on and critical of gear.

Pat Donahue, our former Senior Mountain Bike Editor, has been riding a revolving door of bicycles for a decade and a half. He has ridden well over 100 bikes in that time and is passionate about connecting people with the right bicycles. He has ridden and tested bikes in a huge range of locations and trails ranging from burly bike park laps to heinous all-day epic rides. In 2018 alone he rode approximately 3,000 miles with over 350,000 feet of climbing.

Paul Tindal is a tremendously versatile rider. Growing up in Australia, Aussie Paul rose through the elite ranks as a road rider and triathlete. Upon moving to the United States, he spent time building wheels for a high-end manufacturer prior to becoming a manager and lead mechanic at a high-volume bike shop. All the while, Paul was racing in the professional ranks in the downhill and enduro disciplines. All of this goes to say, this man performs at an outrageously high level on every type of bicycle.

Joshua Hutchens is an industry veteran who has been working with bicycles since the ripe age of 12. This California native has spent an enormous amount of time rolling on two wheels. Joshua has owned a bike shop and is a meticulous mechanic. He has traveled the world as a bicycle guide leading clients on massive rides in some of the most beautiful locations imaginable. Joshua has put in his time as a cross country racer and rides with a tremendous level of finesse and is tremendously in-touch with his bicycle during testing.

Related: How We Tested Best Trail Mountain Bikes


Analysis and Test Results


After testing and racing groups of similar trail bikes head-to-head, we cross-examined the lot of them to bring you this all-encompassing trail mountain bike review. Teams of testers rode two dozen trail bikes extensively over a wide range of terrain and ranked them in terms of fun factor (worth 25%), downhill performance (35%), uphill performance (35%), and ease of maintenance (5%). We compare the best of the best below. The bikes' intended applications, build qualities, and prices range widely. We've found that our favorite bikes shine even with less than ideal components and the best are appropriate for a wide range of terrain.

Related: Buying Advice for Best Trail Mountain Bikes

Charging down some chunder on the new Ibis Ripley.
Charging down some chunder on the new Ibis Ripley.

Value


With such an enormous variety of bikes to chose from, pinpointing which one will offer the best value for your needs can be a big task. We assess both overall performance as well as how the bikes performed relative to price.


Fun Factor


Thomas Aquinas once said, "Fun factor is critical when evaluating a trail mountain bike." That's why fun factor is worth hefty 25% of the final score.


The Ibis Ripley is the epitome of a modern, zippy and fun-loving trail bike. Everything about piloting this 120mm fun-wagon is a blast. The 2019 redesign has made the Ripley far more well rounded, though it's happy seeking out boosts and trail-side shenanigans. There are plenty of overused, cringe-inducing, terms used to describe trail bikes in 2019. Phrases like poppy, snappy, and flickable are hurled around all willy-nilly. That said, the Ripley is a poppy, snappy and flickable bike and the recent overhaul has also made it far more competent on the climbs and in steeper and rougher terrain on descents. Versatility is fun.

The Trance 29 is as fun as two barrels of monkeys
The Trance 29 is as fun as two barrels of monkeys

The Giant Trance 29 2 is another playful trail bike that will have you seeking the fun line at every opportunity. Riding the Trance 29 is a hootin' and hollerin' good time. This is another short-travel 29er that has the ability to alter the opinion of the 29er naysayers whose criticisms get quieter every month. Fine-tuned geometry encourages playfulness on the trail in the form of boosts and manuals. While the Trance doesn't possess the pure playful manners and supreme cornering abilities of the Ripley, it's an incredibly capable descender. This bike can and will comfortably tackle more aggressive trails that may seem to be above its short-travel pay grade. A bonus for those of us who don't live for the climb, the Trance climbs comfortably and painlessly.

The SB130 is fun to ride just about everywhere.
The SB130 is fun to ride just about everywhere.

The Yeti SB130 also has a very high fun factor. This mid-travel 29er climbs extremely well, shreds downhill and operates with razor-sharp handling. This bicycle is fun on a huge range of trails and you'll never feel like it's overkill. A bike that is fun on any trail you put in front of it is somewhat of a rarity.

The YT Jeffsy AL Base is an absurdly capable trail bike  especially considering the price.
The YT Jeffsy AL Base is an absurdly capable trail bike, especially considering the price.

The YT Jeffsy AL Base is an impressively versatile bike given its 140mm of travel. Here at OutdoorGearLab, we find versatility to be very fun. The Jeffsy performs well above its asking price and we feel it is one of the best values for a trail bike that you find. This rig is an efficient climber with a calm pedal platform. Once at the top of the hill, downhill performance is incredibly fun and user-friendly. While the Jeffsy isn't super fun on the gnarliest double black diamond terrain, it is a blast up to that point. This YT is more capable on the descents than the Pivot Trail 429 and Giant Trance. That said, it sacrifices much of the fun-loving, zippy, handling of the shorter-travel bikes.

The Ripmo is impressively capable on a huge range of terrain.
The Ripmo is impressively capable on a huge range of terrain.

Some of the harder charging options are quite fun in their own way. The Santa Cruz Hightower LT and Ibis Ripmo are a blast for those who ride aggressively on steep or rough trails. No, these longer-legged 29ers can't match the climbing abilities of some of the short-travel options, but they really shine on rough and steep trails. They are extremely fun in that they are not limited to certain trail types. You can jump aboard one of these three bikes and ride pretty much any trail. That sounds like fun.

The Santa Cruz Hightower (non-LT) and Specialized Stumpjumper are also well-rounded bikes. Riders who don't typically encounter truly gnarly terrain will have a blast on both mid-travel 29ers. They climb well enough to be great all-day bikes. On the descent, they can ride pretty close to any trail, they just need to be ridden with some caution and precision on the most difficult trails. The Stumpjumper is a particularly interesting option for newer riders. This bike doesn't require an ultra-skilled rider or mach speeds to be fun. Anyone can hop on this bike and start having fun. That is a very high compliment in our books.

Trail bikes are all about versatility. The very best models perform as well on the climbs as they do on the descents.
Trail bikes are all about versatility. The very best models perform as well on the climbs as they do on the descents.

Downhill Performance


Shredding downhill is undoubtedly the lynchpin of a fun mountain bike experience. While all of the bikes in this review are categorized as trail bikes, some are more fun descenders than others. Downhill performance is worth 35% of the final score.


The Ibis Ripmo won the Quiver Killer award. The Ripmo is an impressive descender, especially when you consider how well it climbs. The Ibis has very aggressive geometry and instills confidence when rolling into some sketchy terrain. A 160mm fork is paired with a 2.5-inch Maxxis Minion DHF WT and creates a supremely capable front end. Rolling into a steep chute or nasty rock garden is confident. The Ripmo is great over small bumps and has a calm rear end. The long-and-low geometry delivers an extremely stable ride at high speeds.

The Ripmo delivers on the descents with confidence inspiring trail manners and the angles to get after it.
The Ripmo delivers on the descents with confidence inspiring trail manners and the angles to get after it.

The Rocky Mountain Altitude is a balanced descender that is confident on a wide range of terrain. 27.5-inch wheels and balanced geometry allow this bike to react well at any speed. This user-friendly bike doesn't need to be driven hard to activate its talents like the Hightower LT or Ibis Ripmo High-speed trials with fewer ultra-steep rock gardens are a blast. This bike can get into trouble on harder black-diamond or double black diamond terrain.

The Hightower's suspension is excellent at absorbing bigger hits.
The Hightower's suspension is excellent at absorbing bigger hits.

The Santa Cruz Hightower is an extremely capable descender amongst mid-travel trail mountain bikes. It places riders in a confident position to work down a steep section of trail and provides excellent stability at speed. It is more difficult to find the Hightower's speed limit compared to the Specialized Stumpjumper. The suspension keeps the rear end calm and feels excellent on bigger impacts. Our downhill test track featured a couple relatively harsh G-Outs and drops, the Hightower ate it up. There is no-question this bike rides more aggressively than 135mm of travel suggests.

This redesigned bike is very capable of getting rad.
This redesigned bike is very capable of getting rad.

The Santa Cruz Bronson slides nicely into that not-quite-enduro and not-quite-trail category. This 27.5-inch bike possesses similar downhill manners to the Kona Process 153 CR 27.5 but requires a more aggressive rider to tap into its full potential. The Bronson is also a bit harder to rattle on black-diamond terrain. The Commencal Meta TR is a zippy and quick handling performer on the descent. While this 130mm bike isn't as comfortable straight lining rock gardens, it still feels pretty aggressive and stable. Commencal built the TR with near enduro geometry on a mid-travel platform. The result is a high level of stability at speed while retaining a nimble feel.

The Juliana Joplin is our favorite women's bike for charging downhill. Despite having a slender 110mm of travel, this bike is capable on the descents. The wagon wheels motor over most obstacles on easier to moderate trails. Be warned, this is a short-travel bike and it does have its limitations.

The Ripley is spirited climber.
The Ripley is spirited climber.

Climbing Performance


While grinding uphill may not be as adrenaline-inducing as charging a descent, it is equally important in a trail mountain bike. Being able to comfortably ascend a long climb is critical in choosing a bike. Climbing performance is worth 35% of the final score. It is no surprise the short travel bikes dominate this category. It is worth noting that some of the longer travel options provide exceptional uphill skills especially when you consider how aggressively they attack the descent.


The Ibis Ripley is a fantastic option thanks to its modern geometry, lightweight, and great traction. The 2.6-inch tires provide a nice wide footprint that allows for exceptional performance over loose or technical terrain. The DW-Link suspension is calm and remains fairly active. Climbing positioning is upright with riders being positioned directly on top of the bottom bracket. While this bike doesn't offer the most outright pedaling efficiency, it is a clear favorite on technical terrain.

The Yeti SB130 is an excellent climber. It is especially impressive when you consider how capable this bike is on the downhill. The Switch Infinity suspension is active enough to deliver fantastic rear wheel traction while still offering a firm pedal platform. Pair this dialed suspension design with impressive components and a 29.5-pound weight and you have a formidable weapon. The SB130 is a bike that you can climb on all day long while still being able to thrash down the hill.

The Yeti SB130 climbs with the best of 'em.
The Yeti SB130 climbs with the best of 'em.

The Ibis Ripmo is a surprisingly effective climber. Thanks to the steep seat tube angle, riders are placed in a comfortable and upright position right on top of the cranks. Seated climbing efficiency is impressive and standing climbing loads are calm with a very minimal amount of pedal bob. There is little need to use the climb switch on this 145mm bike. It rides fairly high in its travel to help keep your pedals from smashing rocks or obstacles. There's no doubt that this is one of our most confident descenders, and uphill abilities better than you'd expect from this ripping 29er.

The Ripmo is a very impressive climber in or out of the saddle.
The Ripmo is a very impressive climber in or out of the saddle.

The Pivot Trail 429 has an extremely feathery feel and efficient approach. This short-travel trail mountain bike leans towards the cross-country side of the spectrum. Sitting and spinning uphill is calm and relaxing. Riders sit directly over the crankset allowing for maximum power transfer. The DW Link suspension platform is calm with almost no pedal bob whether standing or seated. Every pedal stroke is productive and is effectively transmitted to the wheels. The Trail 429 is more of an efficient climber than the Giant Trance 29, but it is less comfortable charging through the rocks on the uphills and downhills. Cayon's Neuron CF 8.0 also impressed us on the climbs with a feathery light feel and impressive efficiency.

The Joplin is a very effective climber.
The Joplin is a very effective climber.

The Juliana Joplin is a women's trail mountain bike with a comfortable climbing motion. Modern trail bike geometry creates a balanced and efficient uphill position. Sharp handling makes navigating uphill switchbacks or technical sections of trail reasonably easy. The Specialized Fuse Expert 29 is also a sure-footed climber. While the pure efficiency isn't outstanding for a hardtail, traction really sets it apart as does the simple nature of the stiff rear-end.

Decisions decisions. Matching your next bike to your riding style and terrain is always the best way to go.
Decisions decisions. Matching your next bike to your riding style and terrain is always the best way to go.

Ibis Ripmo vs Santa Cruz Hightower LT


The Santa Cruz Hightower LT and Ibis Ripmo are two of our very favorite bikes. Why? Versatility. These bicycles are comfortable climbing 5000-feet and also spending a day in the bike park. You can't go wrong with either of these two bikes, but they do have inherent strengths and weaknesses.

Ibis Ripmo


The Ripmo offers a tremendously calm climbing experience. Despite the aggressive geometry that screams enduro, this bike works uphill very well. Downhill performance is balanced, the slack geometry and burly components instill confidence while the sporty rear end is surprisingly peppy for a big bike. This bike is best for a rider who wants an aggressive front end while still retaining a very, very sporty feel.

Santa Cruz Hightower LT


The Santa Cruz Hightower LT has feels more like a trail bike compared to the Ripmo. This bike has steeper geometry than the Ibis. Climbing is efficient thanks to high levels of anti-squat that creates a firm pedal platform. On the descent, this bicycle sacrifices small bump compliance for big-hit stability. Small chatter can be a bit jarring, but bigger lines are handled with tremendous composure. This bike is best for a rider who wants enduro capabilities and a trail bike feel.

The Hightower LT is versatile and capable on a wide variety of terrain.
The Hightower LT is versatile and capable on a wide variety of terrain.

Maintenance


Mountain bikes are expensive toys. They require a fair bit of maintenance to keep them running in top shape. It is best to refer to component product manuals for service schedules. That said, you should expect to service your bike regularly.

Full Suspension vs. Hardtail


There is no doubt that a full suspension trail mountain bike possesses performance advantages in every ride category. The one area where hardtail bikes have an advantage is that they don't require pivot/linkage maintenance. You should clean/regrease/torque your suspension pivots multiple times a year to prolong the life of your bearings. In addition, this will keep your bike running far more quietly.

Hardtail mountain bikes are much simpler and require less maintenance than their full suspension counterparts.
Hardtail mountain bikes are much simpler and require less maintenance than their full suspension counterparts.

Maintenance Schedule


Just like keeping up with regular car services, smaller, more frequent services can save you big bucks in the long term. Here's a quick and dirty primer:
  • Before Ever Ride — Check tire pressure, brake function, axle torque levels
  • After Every Ride — Clean and lube chain, wipe down stanchions
  • Weekly — Clean off mud and debris, check spoke tension
  • Bi-Weekly — Check for and tighten any loose bolts, check headset for proper tightness, clean pivots, check shock pressure
  • Monthly — Check chain wear and brake pads. Replace as necessary
  • Annually — Complete professional overhaul

A well maintained bike will keep you on the trail and out the bike shop.
A well maintained bike will keep you on the trail and out the bike shop.

Ease of Maintenance Ratings


Some bikes are more challenging to maintain than others. We ranked the ease of maintenance for the bikes in our test based on the following criteria:
  • Suspension Pivots — How often they need to be serviced, how complicated that service is, and how expensive the bearings are.
  • Fork and Shock — These are the most expensive components on your bike and also the most complicated. Suspension products should be serviced at least once a year. Manufacturers will tell you to replace wiper seals far more frequently. This all depends on trail conditions and how frequently you ride. We rate the forks and shocks based on how often the oil and seals need to be changed, how often it requires a complete rebuild, and how costly and accessible that service is.
  • Dropper Post — The dropper post is a relatively new component. Just like any suspension product, it needs to be serviced periodically. Certain designs require far more attention than others. Mechanical droppers are often preferred as opposed to hydraulic units which have a high number of seals that wear and require replacement. Having a dropper post means more maintenance (and fun). These bikes scored a little lower.
  • Brakes — Brake pads wear and the hydraulic fluid needs to be bled to have air pockets removed from the lines. This should be done annually. We score Shimano brakes a little better than SRAM. Shimano has a long service interval and uses mineral oil and a simpler bleed process. SRAM brakes require corrosive DOT 5.1 fluid and a tricker bleed process.
  • Drivetrain — Chain, cassette, and chainrings all wear together. If you ride 2-3 times a week, expect to replace a chain a couple times a year and other drivetrain components annually. We don't account for drivetrain wear and tear in the rankings.
  • Tires — Different rubber compounds burn at different speeds. Expect to purchase one or two sets of tires per season for your trail mountain bike. We don't consider tires in the rankings.
  • Wheels — It is important to have proper spoke tension on your wheels. It is a good idea to have them trued and tensioned a couple times a year to avoid serious issues. We don't include wheels in the score either.


Our fork and shock ease of maintenance rankings reflect the manufacturers recommended service intervals. According to owner manuals, Fox suspension items require less attention than RockShox. Local mechanics we spoke with stated they have to service Fox products more often than their intervals suggest.

The wrong size can make any bike unpleasant to ride.
The wrong size can make any bike unpleasant to ride.

Fit


It can be difficult to comment on fit specifics as it often boils down to personal preference. Some folks like to ride a slightly smaller frame for added maneuverability and confidence. Other people prefer a larger frame with a shorter stem for stability and extra space to move on the climbs.

Here is a list of bikes that have unusual fit characteristics:
  • Ibis Ripmo- The Ripmo is a bike we recommend sitting on before deciding on the size frame you want. Our six-foot tall testers felt the size large felt a little on the small side and were extending the seat post to max extension on our test bike.
  • Santa Cruz Hightower- The Hightower has a long and spacious top tube. Riders on the shorter end of the size spectrum should be careful and consider a shorter stem.
  • Specialized Stumpjumper- The Stumpjumper is tight in the top tube. Be careful if you are on the higher end of a recommended frame size.

No matter what  mountain biking is a blast. Get a bike that suits your trails and riding style  then get out and ride.
No matter what, mountain biking is a blast. Get a bike that suits your trails and riding style, then get out and ride.

Conclusion


The Ibis Ripley and Giant Trance 29 2 are standouts in the short-travel category. These trail mountain bikes are ideal for the rider who doesn't feel the need to attack the absolute gnarliest terrain. The Santa Cruz Hightower and Yeti SB130 are fantastic mid-travel options. These bikes are fantastic for folks who want to ride a wide range of terrain. The Ibis Ripmo and Santa Cruz Hightower LT are excellent longer travel options. These bikes are best suited for riders who want to ride aggressive black-diamond terrain and don't mind sacrificing some climbing abilities.


Jeremy Benson, Pat Donahue, Joshua Hutchens, Paul Tindal