Reviews You Can Rely On

Best Camping Axe of 2021

This Fiskars camping axe delivers an impressive amount of power in a c...
Photo: Clark Tate
By Clark Tate ⋅ Senior Review Editor
Monday October 4, 2021
  • Share this article:
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
If you're on the hunt for the best camping axe, we swung 11 of the best to find the right one for you. We researched over 30 of the top options on the market before buying them to test their blades head-to-head in the real world. We bucked up fallen locust trees, split rounds, chopped kindling, and limbed and removed every invasive autumn olive tree we could find. It can be hard to tell which axes excel at splitting firewood, which are perfect for precision tasks, and easy to carry without hands-on experience. So we did it for you. In the process, we found the best splitters, our favorite limbers, and top options for those shopping on a budget.

Top 11 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 11
< Previous | Compare | Next >
 
Awards Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award 
Price $53.99 at Amazon$215.75 at Amazon$53.99 at Amazon$99.99 at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$50.06 at Amazon
Overall Score Sort Icon
88
84
83
83
74
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Versatile, easy to carry, coated to reduce frictionWell-balance, very sharp, responsibly built to lastSharp, compact and easy to carryExcellent quality, longer handle for better leverage, wedged bladeLight, very easy to carry and surprisingly powerful
Cons Larger than some, the shealth has a weak spotNot great at splitting wood, expensiveMore expensiveHeavier, harder to pack or use with one handToo short for bigger jobs, sling carrier can get in the way
Bottom Line A packable axe that splits rounds and kindling as well as it clears downed tree limbsBeautiful, eco-friendly and well-made, this axe is a pleasure to swing but a bit less versatileThis is a great little axe for one-handed tasks, from kindling to limbing to splitting a bit of firewoodAn excellent option for splitting rounds that's still small enough to feel portableImpressive grip, power, and accuracy in a lightweight and easy to carry package
Rating Categories Fiskars X11 17-Inch Gransfors Bruks Sma... Gerber 14-Inch Free... Fiskars Norden N12 Kershaw Deschutes B...
Balance And Accuracy (25%)
9.0
10.0
9.0
7.0
8.0
Wood Splitting (25%)
9.0
6.0
7.0
10.0
5.0
Sharpness (20%)
8.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
Ease Of Carrying (15%)
9.0
7.0
9.0
7.0
9.0
Durability (15%)
9.0
10.0
9.0
9.0
8.0
Specs Fiskars X11 17-Inch Gransfors Bruks Sma... Gerber 14-Inch Free... Fiskars Norden N12 Kershaw Deschutes B...
Handle materials FiberComp™ with hollow shock absorbing chamber Hickory wood FiberComp™ with hollow shock absorbing chamber Hickory wood handle with FiberComp™ overstrike protection Glass-filled nylon with rubber overlay
Blade materials Forged steel Steel from recycled scrap metal Forged steel Carbon steel with low friction coating and over molded head Steel () 3Cr13 with black oxide coating
Sheath plastic with a handle to carry and hang the axe Vegetable-tanned Leather that is free of heavy metalsand made to attach to your belt plastic with a handle to carry and hang the axe Recycled leather sheath with belt loop plastic and webbing with a sling
Measurements 17.5" long, blade 3" wide, 6" long 19.5" long, blade 3.25" wide, 6.13" long 14" long, blade 2.75 wide, 5.1" long 19.5" long, blade 3" wide, 6" long 14" long, blade 3.5" wide, 5" long
Weight w sheath and wo 2.51 lb and 2.41 lb 2.25 lb and 2.14 lb 1.4 lb and 1.3 lb 2.8 lb and 2.7 lb 1.78 lb and 1.55 b
Warranty Full Lifetime Warranty 20-Year Guarentee - they want to take less, produce less, destroy less Limited Lifetime Warranty Full Lifetime Warranty Limited Lifetime Warranty
Origins Made in Finland Hand forged in Sweden Made in Finland Made in Finland Made in China


Best Camping Axe


Fiskars X11 17-Inch


88
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Balance and Accuracy 9
  • Wood Splitting 9
  • Sharpness 8
  • Ease of carrying 9
  • Durability 9
Weight: 2.51 lbs | Dimensions: 3" blade, 17.5" handle
Great at splitting with a low friction coating
Vibration dampening handle
Efficient enough for bigger jobs
Easy to carry
A larger option
One weak point on the sheath

The Fiskars X11 Splitting Axe is a stellar camping axe. Impeccably balanced and compact enough for most adults to use with one hand, it's great for small jobs like splitting kindling or limbing trees. It also excels at bucking up larger logs and, living up to its name, splitting firewood. This last task is the most impressive and rare among camping axes. The sharp blade widens into a wedge with a pronounced curve on the axe'scheek. Instead of biting into a round of wood, it also forces the grain apart for an efficient split. Fiskars claims that the geometry, specifically the concave cheek, makes it easier to pull back out of the wood. We have to agree. The low friction coating doesn't hurt. The orange end of the handle is hollow to absorb the shock of a blow. We feel like it works well, keeping our hands and forearms fresh. We also appreciate that the sheath doubles as a handle for longer walks from camp.

Made in Finland, the X11's construction seems very solid. The molded head is robust, and we don't have any durability concerns for the axe itself. There is a spinning lock on the plastic sheath that seems like a possible weak point. Time will tell how long it lasts. At 17.5" long and 2.4 pounds, the X11 is larger and heavier than many other options. That gives you more leverage and power, though, which works well for splitting firewood. Its balance also keeps it feeling light in hand. If you're willing to haul that extra weight, this axe works at home and camp flawlessly. It offers great value, and its length, balance, and effective blade shape combine to make quick work of most tasks.

Of all models we tested, the X11 offers the best all-around...
Of all models we tested, the X11 offers the best all-around performance and a reasonably compact size.
Photo: Clark Tate

Best Bang for Your Buck


MTech USA Two-Tone


55
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Balance and Accuracy 6
  • Wood Splitting 4
  • Sharpness 6
  • Ease of carrying 6
  • Durability 6
Weight: 1.48 lbs | Dimensions: 3.5" blade, 11" handle
Compact and nicely balanced
Nice grip
Sharp
Short length gets old
Sheath isn't that protective

The MTech is light and small. That means it's easy to fit in a pack or stash in your rig, a big plus for a camping axe. It also feels sturdy and well-made, with a fairly sharp blade out of the box and without any discernible weak points. The handle is comfortable to grip, with an arched construction that provides excellent balance, leverage, and blade control. The combination makes it reasonably powerful and pleasant to use. We like it best for chopping kindling out of pre-split wood or scraps. It also works well for felling small saplings or light limbing.

The MTech's short handle makes it less suited to bigger jobs, like cutting a log in half. And it is not suited to splitting anything larger than kindling. On larger wood rounds, it just bites into the wood without wedging it apart. We also worry about the nylon sheath. Its snaps are stubborn, making it hard to open and close. The entire sheath can also slip, exposing the top tip of the blade even when it's closed properly. If you choose this one, be careful to avoid cutting yourself or duct tape the sheath's top edge. We think of this as a backup camping axe. It's not large enough to use for extended tasks or large logs, but it will easily chop enough kindling for a fire, help you knock in some tent stacks, and clear a limb or two out of the trail. Overall, the MTech offers the best performance of the compact options in the test.

The MTech is sharp, swings well, and is a great size for packing.
The MTech is sharp, swings well, and is a great size for packing.
Photo: Clark Tate

Best Compact Option


Gerber 14-Inch Freescape


83
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Balance and Accuracy 9
  • Wood Splitting 7
  • Sharpness 8
  • Ease of carrying 9
  • Durability 9
Weight: 1.4 lbs | Dimensions: 2.75" blade, 14" handle
Compact and easy to carry
Suited to one-handed use
Shock-absorbing handle
Very versatile
Too small to split much
More expensive than it needs to be

The Gerber 14-inch Freescape Hatchet offers excellent performance in a robust yet compact package. It's made in Finland by Fiskars and branded for Gerber, so it's very similar to the other two Fiskars options in the test. Its molded head, vibration-damping hollow handle, and wedged steel blade make for a comfortable and efficient tool. It also has the same plastic sheath with a carrying handle as the Fiskars X11, making it convenient to grab and go. It is the smallest of the Fiskars and so the easiest to wield one-handed. For that reason, we choose it most often for light-duty jobs like cutting down invasive autumn olive shoots and chopping kindling. The friction-reducing coating on the blade helps you along.

With its wedge-shaped head, it's excellent at splitting off small pieces of wood but starts to suffer if you need to split rounds or full-sized firewood. It's just too small to be effective at that scale. It doesn't have the convex cheeks that make it easier to pull the other two Fiskars options out of the wood between strikes, either. You can use it to chop logs in half. It just takes more time and patience. It is more expensive than we'd like, especially since Fiskars has a very similar option available on their website for less. If you want an axe that can do it all but excels at light-duty tasks, we can't argue with the Freescape's performance.

The Gerber is a branded version of a Fiskars 14-inch hatchet. It&#039;s a...
The Gerber is a branded version of a Fiskars 14-inch hatchet. It's a great little option.
Photo: Clark Tate

4

Best for Bucking and Limbing


Gransfors Bruks Small Forest


84
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Balance and Accuracy 10
  • Wood Splitting 6
  • Sharpness 9
  • Ease of carrying 7
  • Durability 10
Weight: 2.25 lbs | Dimensions: 3.25" blade, 19.5" handle
Excellent proportions and balance
Heritage quality
Sharp
Expensive
Not built for splitting rounds

The Gransfors Bruks Small Forest axe is hand-forged from recycled steel with a hickory handle. There's even a tanned vegan leather sheath that doubles as a belt loop. It looks beautiful and works beautifully. The curved handle balances the weight of the axe head nicely. It feels light in hand, gives you excellent leverage, and improves precision. This is one of our favorite options for accuracy tests like limbing a log and power tests like bucking it into rounds. It's long enough to channel your power, and the sharp blade gets the job done quickly. We also like it for cutting down small trees and chopping kindling. This axe is so pleasant to use that we go looking for tasks. It's solid and built to last.

While the Bruks Small Forest will split rounds, it's not great at it. The blade bites into the round but doesn't pry it apart since the head doesn't widen into a wedge. We limited our splitting chores with this axe, though it's great and carving kindling off from pre-split wood. If a recycled hand-forged axe made in Sweden sounds expensive, that's because it is. Its good looks, environmental ethic, and excellent accuracy need to be worth it to you.

While the Gransfors blade isn&#039;t built to wedge wood apart for...
While the Gransfors blade isn't built to wedge wood apart for splitting, it executes every other task beautifully.
Photo: Clark Tate

Best for Splitting


Fiskars Norden N12


83
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Balance and Accuracy 7
  • Wood Splitting 10
  • Sharpness 8
  • Ease of carrying 7
  • Durability 9
Weight: 2.8 lbs | Dimensions: 3" blade, 19.5" handle
Powerful
Wedged head for splitting wood
Durable
Heavier
Not as well-balanced

The Fiskars X11 axe is great at splitting firewood, especially given its compact size. The Norden N12 Splitting Axe is better, primarily because it's longer and gives you more leverage. They share a blade design, complete with a wedged head, convex cheeks, a low friction finish, and a molded head-to-handle connection meant to protect from overstrikes. The N12 feels lively in our hands as we work through the woodpile, splitting rounds into fireplace-ready stacks. It also serves well for smaller tasks like kindling and larger ones like bucking up logs. It has enough heft and length to put weight behind your swings.

We don't find the same precision in our strikes as the Gransfors affords, though. And, all of our testers preferred other options when it came to delicate or overhead work like limbing trees. Fiskars advertises the Norden as a one or two-handed axe. Our smallest woman tester definitely needed two. The head feels heavy, and we found it less balanced than the other two Fiskars options. We wouldn't use it to replace a machete or a dedicated splitting axe or maul with a longer handle. We do use it as a solid, all-around camping axe. If you're a van lifer, car camper, or don't mind some extra weight, this is a great option for your kindling chopping, firewood splitting, and log clearing needs.

The Norden is similar to the X11 and also has a wedged blade with...
The Norden is similar to the X11 and also has a wedged blade with convex cheeks and overstrike protection. With its longer handle, it's our favorite for larger jobs.
Photo: Clark Tate

Easiest to Carry


Kershaw Deschutes Bearded Hatchet


74
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Balance and Accuracy 8
  • Wood Splitting 5
  • Sharpness 8
  • Ease of carrying 9
  • Durability 8
Weight: 1.55 lbs | Dimensions: 3.5" blade, 14" handle
Powerful
Comfortable in hand
Easy to carry
Handle length limits use
Sheath sling can be annoying

The Kershaw Deschutes Bearded Hatchet is one of the lightest and most compact options that we'd opt to use for anything more than a quick job or two, like getting a fire going or cutting down a few shrubs. The entire axe head is thin, keeping weight down while the mid-length handle still gives you the power you need to get the job done. The axe head is 3Cr13 steel with a black oxide coating. It's one of the sharper options in the test out of the box, and the rubber inserts on the glass-filled nylon handle are comfortable to hold. The construction seems solid, and we expect this axe to last. The plastic sheath is also surprisingly sturdy and handy, with an included nylon strap so you can sling it over your shoulder. We like this axe best for jobs like cutting down saplings, chopping up kindling, and carving off small limbs, though it also does a surprisingly good job cutting a log in half.

We wouldn't want to cut log after log with this camping axe. It's just too short to be efficient for jobs that call for more power. The nylon webbing sling on the sheath can be annoying if you don't need it, but it's easy for you to remove. This axe does the best job of balancing weight and power and is our favorite choice to toss in a backpack to keep trails clear of fire roaring.

The Kershaw is light, easy to grip while making surprisingly quick...
The Kershaw is light, easy to grip while making surprisingly quick work of even big jobs like chopping a log in half.
Photo: Clark Tate

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
88
$55
Editors' Choice Award
A packable axe that splits rounds and kindling as well as it clears downed tree limbs
84
$240
Top Pick Award
Beautiful, eco-friendly and well-made, this axe is a pleasure to swing but a bit less versatile
83
$51
Top Pick Award
This is a great little axe for one-handed tasks, from kindling to limbing to splitting a bit of firewood
83
$100
Top Pick Award
An excellent option for splitting rounds that's still small enough to feel portable
74
$95
Top Pick Award
Impressive grip, power, and accuracy in a lightweight and easy to carry package
63
$45
Solid, sharp and nicely balanced with a slippery handle that is hard to hold
55
$16
Best Buy Award
This small, affordable axe is sharp and good for quick jobs like chopping kindling or saplings
53
$25
Light and pleasant to wield, this axe didn't arrive as well-sharpened as other competitors
41
$35
Too short to do much more than carve some kindling, hack off a few limbs, or slice cheese
37
$55
Light enough to pack and carry easily, the SOG's straight handle doesn't give you much leverage
29
$19
We had a hard time getting this axe to bite

Why You Should Trust Us


Clark Tate, our lead tester, grew up in a house heated by wood. That meant spending weekends watching trees fall to the sound of a chain saw, splitting rounds, and stacking wood. After grad school, she turned cutting trees down into a living, controlling invasive tamarisk and Russian olive trees on western rivers. And when you're running rivers, you're building fires. Clark's no stranger to turning wood into kindling. In a two-generational effort, she also ran these axes by her Dad, Glen Tate, the one in charge of cutting all those trees down. He grew up cutting, bucking, and milling trees to build fences and barns on the family dairy farm.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Our two lead testers split rounds, chopped up logs, and went on an invasive autumn olive tree-chopping rampage (because old habits die hard). Switching back forth between the axes and comparing notes made it clear which are well-balanced, which are built to split, which are sharp, and which are tiring.

Analysis and Test Results


Most of these options do a passable job of cutting up kindling. It's the limbing and splitting work that elevates a handful above the rest. Keep reading to find out which axe is right for you.


Value


We know how much your money means to you. So after we compare these axes' performance, we rank their value as well. Those with high scores and low costs will always be a great buy. Our top choice, the Fiskars X11 is hard to beat with top scores across the board and a mid-range price tag. The Gerber Freescape costs about as much but is more compact. It's a solid investment, but it is a branded Fiskars product, and they sell a similar version for less. For that reason, we're not particularly impressed with the Freescape's value.

The Gerber Freescape is made by Fiskars in Finland, as you can see...
The Gerber Freescape is made by Fiskars in Finland, as you can see on the axe itself.
Photo: Clark Tate

If you need a budget buy for chopping kindling and limbs, the MTech USA gives you a sharp blade and balanced performance with one of the lowest price tags in the test. The Fiskars Norden is one of the more expensive options, but if you need to chop any amount of firewood, its longer handle and solid construction are worth it, in our opinion.

The Gransfors Bruk Small Forest axe is far more expensive than any other item in the test. It’s also meant to be an heirloom and is hand-forged using processes that are sustainable and treat workers fairly. If you share those values, the price and quality of the axe may well be worth it to you.

The Gransfors Small Forest axe is one of the best for cutting logs...
The Gransfors Small Forest axe is one of the best for cutting logs in half or limbing trees.
Photo: Clark Tate

Balance and Accuracy


Cutting wood is hard work. You want every swing to count. A well-balanced axe transfers power effectively from the handle through the blade, cutting into the wood efficiently. It also works with your body, making accuracy easier.


The Gransfors Bruks Small Forest offers outstanding balance and is our favorite option in the test for precise tasks like limbing logs or cutting down saplings (of invasive species only, don't worry). The Fiskars X11 is a close second. It's a little less light and lively and more ruthlessly efficient, which we appreciate. The hollow orange handle also helps absorb some of the vibrations, saving your forearms.

The shorter but very similar Gerber Freescape is also balanced and easy to put where you want it, particularly given its compact size.

The Kershaw&#039;s narrow width keeps it light and easy to use with one...
The Kershaw's narrow width keeps it light and easy to use with one hand.
Photo: Clark Tate

The Estwing and Kershaw options are also well-balanced axes, though they have very different designs. The Kershaw is incredibly light and straight. The Estwing balances its hefty weight with a power-transfering curve.

Unfortunately, the Estwing's sanded and lacquered leather handle wrap is hard to hold onto, detracting from its efficiency and tiring our hands and forearms quickly. It's less accurate for this reason, and we don't reach for it often. In contrast, the Kershaw has a great grip. It's light but still manages to make headway in a hurry.

We really wish the leather handle was easier to hold because the...
We really wish the leather handle was easier to hold because the Estwing is satisfying to swing.
Photo: Clark Tate

Both make headway more quickly than the MTech and Schrade, which have similar and pleasant swings but less power. Of the two, the MTech is sharper and more effective.

The Fiskars Norden N12 is more top-heavy than other top options, making it harder to swing with one hand. It's not terrible, and we don't have trouble with accuracy when we're splitting wood or choking up on the handle to hold it near the axe head. Still, this axe isn't our favorite for precision tasks.

The Husqvarna is not well balanced. The axe head is too heavy for the handle, and we don't like it for smaller, precise jobs. It's more of a bruiser. On the other end of the scale is the Gerber. You don't swing this one so much as you chop with it. There's not much there to balance. It can be accurate, though, if you use it more like a cross between a plane and a knife. The SOG is graceless but works.

The three axes made by Fiskars are the only options in the test that...
The three axes made by Fiskars are the only options in the test that excel at splitting wood thanks to their wedge-shaped blades.
Photo: Clark Tate

Wood Splitting


Though all of these camping axes will shave kindling from ready-made firewood, only the three Fiskars options are proficient at splitting it in the first place. The X11 and the Norden were made for it, after all, with the cutting edge curving up to a convex wedge. They both work exceedingly well and are a welcome break from our testing consultant's normally massive splitting maul.


The Norden is a bit better since it's bigger and longer, though we appreciate the X11's hollow, impact dampening handle. We do find that it keeps our forearms and hands fresh.

They are both smaller than many full-size splitting axes, which means it may take longer to get through a full woodpile. That mean's they're compact enough to work as camping axes, though. Our lead female tester particularly likes using them for daily chores as well as for camping, since she is smaller herself.

The Small Forest&#039;s sharp and tapered axe head is great at precisely...
The Small Forest's sharp and tapered axe head is great at precisely biting into your target and slicing off kindling, but it doesn't do much to wedge wood apart when you're splitting larger rounds.
Photo: Clark Tate

Due to its compact, 14" length, the Gerber Freescape is more of a purebred camping axe that can also chop wood when you need it to. Also made by Fiskar, it sports a wedge-shaped head for splitting wood, but the cheeks aren't concave to help you extract the blade from the wood between strikes. Its shorter length gives you less leverage but makes it very easy to wield.

You can see the Fiskars&#039; wedge shape, which does a great job of...
You can see the Fiskars' wedge shape, which does a great job of splitting wood, and the slightly convex curve that they claim helps you pull it back out of the wood. It worked for us.
Photo: Clark Tate

The rest of the axes bite into the wood but don't effectively wedge it apart. It's not their main purpose. They can split kindlin. The accuracy of the Fiskars, Gransfors, and Kershaw help again here. The sharpness and easy swing of the MTech also works, but we tire faster when using it. The Estwing offers a similar experience but with more power and, unfortunately, a slick handle.

All of our favorite axes in the test arrived sharpened and ready to...
All of our favorite axes in the test arrived sharpened and ready to work.
Photo: Clark Tate

Sharpness


We tested these axes right out of the box to compare their sharpness. We are most impressed by the razor edge of the Gransfors Bruk. The three Fiskars axes, including the Gerber branded Freescape, are nearly as good as is the Kershaw Deschutes. All of them maintained a great edge throughout weeks of testing.


The Estwing Sportsman's Axe is nearly as sharp as the category leaders, with the MTech following closely behind. All of these axes performed to our expectations. The performance of the remaining axes tended to suffer due to blunter blades.

The Schrade is very similar to the MTech but isn't as effective. Its comparatively dull edge takes far longer to get anything done. The Gerber Pack Hatchet and SOG Axe are another step down from there, making them frustrating to work with. The Best Choice is comically blunt.

Handles are handy. We really appreciate the one that Fiskars added...
Handles are handy. We really appreciate the one that Fiskars added to its sheath.
Photo: Clark Tate

Ease of Carrying


Part of what makes an axe good for camping is that it's easy to pack and carry. That means shortening the handle and making it less pleasant to use for large jobs or long periods. That's why we're so impressed with the Fiskars X11, Fiskars Norden, Kershaw, Gransfors Bruk, and Gerber Freescape. All are relatively compact and offer excellent utility. They also happen to come with the handiest carrying systems.


While most of the axes include a loop on their nylon sheath that you can run a belt through, you have to take off your belt to do so. These five axes take a different approach. The X11 and Freescape include a plastic handle on their sheathes, the Kershaw gives you a nylon sling that you can use or choose to tuck away, and the Gransfors and Norden will clip around your belt without the need to remove it. Easy indeed.

The removable carrying sling attached to the Kersahw&#039;s easy-to-use...
The removable carrying sling attached to the Kersahw's easy-to-use sheath lets your hands swing free as you walk to your project site.
Photo: Clark Tate

The MTech, Estwing, Schrade, and Gerber are small enough to toss in a back or loop through your belt. Of these, the Gerber would be the most comfortable to wear but the least useful once you get there.

The well-made Small Forest Axe seems sturdy enough to become an...
The well-made Small Forest Axe seems sturdy enough to become an heirloom. Its sheath also clips onto your belt for easy carrying.
Photo: Clark Tate

Durability


This Gransfors Bruk is a beautiful little beast that should hold up over time. The three Fiskbars axes (including the branded Gerber Freescape) also feature quality construction, leaving little cause for concern. The X11 and Freescape have plastic dials that lock them into their sheaths that seem easy to break. It's not mission-critical, though.


The Estwing&#039;s one-piece steel construction feels indestructible.
The Estwing's one-piece steel construction feels indestructible.
Photo: Clark Tate

The Estwing forges its axe from a single piece of steel in the U.S. We don't see it failing anytime soon. The Kershaw and Gerber handles seem similarly well-anchored to their steel axe heads, but time shall tell. The streamlined MTech and Schrade axes leave little to break, while the multiple connection points on the SOG give us pause.

These axes vary in shape, size, and intended purpose. We hope we&#039;ve...
These axes vary in shape, size, and intended purpose. We hope we've helped find the right option for you.
Photo: Clark Tate

Conclusion


With any luck, we've answered your camping axe questions. Now you too can find the perfect option to strap on your backpack, toss in your car camping rig, or strap to the outside of your camper van as you head out to the horizon.

Clark Tate