The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

The Best Women's Daypacks of 2019

Tuesday May 14, 2019
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Looking for the best women's daypack you can buy in 2019? We researched over 80 daypacks and then bought 15 models, from smaller bags to larger ones that can hold a day's plus worth of gear. We wore them for months, covering dozens of miles in each. Then we compared their comfort and adjustability and carefully examined all of the various features available to give our recommendations on which "bells and whistles" are useful and which will get in the way.


Top 15 Product Ratings

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Awards Editors' Choice Award     
Price $150 List
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$107.66 at Amazon$149.95 at REI
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Pros Comfortable, lots of good features, water reservoir includedComfortable, well-ventilated, adjustable torso length, included rain coverCompact, adjustable, comfortable for a light bag.Large capacity, good back ventilation, adjustable torso, included rain coverLightweight, a few nice features, adjustable torso
Cons On the heavy side, expensiveHeavy, ill-fitting hipbeltNo rain cover, hip belt pockets are made of mesh.Runs small, heavy, expensive, large for average day hike needsMinimal padding, loses shape when stuffed
Bottom Line A versatile daypack that can hold a lot of gear.This pack is loaded with features, and if it fits, you'll love it!A light and simple daypack that is perfect for quick jaunts on the trail.The biggest and most comfortable daypack in our test group. Great for heavy loads and big days out.A simple daypack for light loads and quick hikes.
Rating Categories CamelBak Sequoia 22 Osprey Sirrus 24 Lowe Alpine Aeon ND20 Gregory Jade 28L Gregory Maya 22
Comfort (25%)
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Specs CamelBak Sequoia 22 Osprey Sirrus 24 Lowe Alpine Aeon... Gregory Jade 28L Gregory Maya 22
Weight (oz) 36 41 29 42 28
Volume/Capacity (liters) 22 24 20 28 22
Back Construction Ventilated back panel with molded pods Ventilated tensioned mesh Air Contour backing with Flexion harness Crossflow suspension Padded, mesh covered
Hydration External hydration sleeve and 3L Crux reservoir included Internal hydration sleeve External hydration sleeve Internal hydration sleeve External hydration sleeve
Hipbelt Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Compartments 2 1 1 1 2
Rain Cover No Yes No Yes No
Additional pockets 7 5 5 6 6
Outside Carry Options Trekking pole and ice axe attachments, side pocket, hip belt pockets (one zip), daisy chain, hydration hose clip Trekking pole attachment, ice axe loop, side strech pockets Trekking pole and ice axe attachements, side pockets, helmet attachment External stretch pocket, trekking pole holders, ice axe attachement, sunglasses loop and bungee, hip belt pockets, hydration hose clip Expandable front pocket, loop for helmet, two side pockets, trekking pole and ice axe attachments, sunglasses loop and bungee, hip belt pockets, hydration hose clip
Whistle No Yes Yes Yes No
Key Clip Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Materials 200D ripstop nylon, 400D plain-weave nylon 210D nylon body, 420D nylon bottom Abrasion-resistant nylon coated with TriSheild 210D nylon body, 420D nylon bottom 210D nylon body, 420D nylon bottom
Notable Features Hydration bladder included, multiple pockets in both hip belts, internal storage pockets, exterior pocket felt-lined Ice axe loop, trekking pole attachment, adjustable back Ice axe loops, trekking pole attachment, adjustable back Adjustable torso length, internal pocket, cinch straps, sunglasses quick-stow Adjustable torso length, internal pocket, cinch straps, exterior pocket felt-lined, sunglasses quick-stow

Best Pack Overall


CamelBak Sequoia 22


Editors' Choice Award

$150 List
See It

81
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 9
  • Versatility - 25% 9
  • Weight - 25% 6
  • Ease of Use - 15% 8
  • Durability - 10% 9
Weight: 2.3 pounds | Capacity: 22 liters
Excellent comfort
Roomy interior
Water reservoir included
Great feature set
Expensive
No rain cover included
Heavy
If you're looking for one of the plushest all-around daypacks out there, the CamelBak Sequoia 22 is hard to beat. It has a great hip belt with tons of storage, and the lumbar area and shoulder straps have a lot of padding. CamelBak has included a 3L hydration reservoir with the pack, the only model in our review to do so. There's a separate insulated pocket for the reservoir, and a lot of storage in the main compartment as well. The back of the bag has raised foam panels to help keep you cool, and they provide a barrier that prevents the reservoir from pushing into your back.

While the Sequoia is one of the more expensive models in our test group, that price does include a hydration reservoir, so you are getting a lot for your dollar. This was also one of the heavier bags, and you might find it a little too bulky for quick hikes. There's no rain cover included either (you can buy one separately) so keep that in mind if you live in a wet climate. If any of the above complaints seem like deal breakers to you, we have other options below to fit all of those needs. Otherwise, if you're looking for a comfortable bag for long days on the trail that performs the well across the board, get the CamelBak Sequoia 22.

Read review: CamelBak Sequoia 22

Best Bang for the Buck


Gonex Updated 35L


Best Buy Award

$35.99
at Amazon
See It

56
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 6
  • Versatility - 25% 7
  • Weight - 25% 4
  • Ease of Use - 15% 6
  • Durability - 10% 4
Weight: 2.6 pounds | Capacity: 35 liters
Many pockets and features
Fairly comfortable
Rain cover included
Inexpensive
Not very durable
Not well-ventilated in the back
Smaller capacity than claimed

In a world filled with fancy daypacks (and their fancy prices!), enter the Gonex. You might think "this price is too good to be true, right?" Well, it depends on what you're looking for in your new bag. The Gonex 35L has many of the same organizational features in traditional packs, including a weight-bearing hip belt, comfortable cushioning to cradle your spine, and a myriad of pockets, loops, and straps to organize and stow all your gear. It even features a handy rain cover tucked away in the bottom of the bag for those of you who enjoy hiking when the world smells fresh and clean.

However, as one of the least expensive models we tested, there is a bit of a trade-off with the Gonex that may or may not be worth it for you. This pack is one of the heaviest in this review - though that weight was reduced when we removed the stiff back panel insert that our reviewers found uncomfortable anyway. It also lacks any hydration sleeve, so if you're a die-hard water bladder user, this may not be the bag for you. We also discovered that though the Gonex claims a capacity of 35L, it was much closer to the 28L side of things - still a decent size, but not gigantic. And though we had no issues with durability during our testing, the material used for this bag is not nearly as sturdy and ready-for-anything as most of the others we checked out. Still, if you're an infrequent daypack user just searching for a bag that can do the job without breaking the bank, the Gonex could be exactly what you're looking for.

Read review: Gonex Updated 35L

Top Pick for Around Town


Osprey Tempest 20


65
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 6
  • Versatility - 25% 8
  • Weight - 25% 7
  • Ease of Use - 15% 4
  • Durability - 10% 6
Weight: 1.6 pounds | Capacity: 20 liters
Lightweight and comfortable
Feature-laden
"Lidlock" attachment for bike helmets
Sizing runs small
Small internal capacity
Less adjustable than others

For those who like to use a daypack for commuting around town or general daily use, check out the Osprey Tempest 20. This lightweight bag is big enough to fit a standard laptop and some books or binders, without being too bulky or heavy. It has good padding on the hip belt and shoulder straps, and the mesh back helps with airflow and circulation. Best of all, it has a bike helmet attachment which works! The "Lidlock" tab and bungee cord help keep your helmet securely against the bag, with no flopping around.

The Tempest is less adjustable than other models, and the sizing runs on the small side. We tested the "larger" size, and it's still too small for our 5'6" tester. Petite ladies, this one is for you! If you're commuting on a bike and want an easy way to carry your helmet once you lock it up, the Osprey Tempest is an excellent choice that'll work well on the trails also.

Read review: Osprey Tempest 20

Top Pick for an Ultralight Pack


Osprey Ultralight Stuff Pack


Top Pick Award

$26.21
(25% off)
at Amazon
See It

63
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort - 25% 3
  • Versatility - 25% 8
  • Weight - 25% 10
  • Ease of Use - 15% 4
  • Durability - 10% 4
Weight: 0.25 pounds | Capacity: 18 liters
Super lightweight
Reasonably comfortable
Retains some useful features
Packs into its own pocket
No hip belt
Can feel contents
Small fit

There are times when you just need a bag to bring your essentials, but you don't have space for a big, fully framed pack. This is where an ultralight, super packable bag like the Osprey Ultralight comes in handy. It strips away all the fancy features of your regular pack but retains just enough features to keep it useful. With a side pocket and small top pocket, you can keep yourself organized on the go. Lightly padded shoulder straps help keep it more comfortable than many of its competitors. Weighing just 3.8 ounces and packing down into its own pocket, this on-the-go bag is easy to bring with you just about anywhere.

With such a simple design, the Ultralight Stuff Pack does miss out on some important features like a hip belt and ventilated back panel. The material is incredibly thin, meaning you'll need to pack this like a pro to avoid feeling every bump and corner of your hiking essentials. It's also a very small bag overall, so if you find yourself gravitating toward taller or larger bags for a better fit, the short straps on this bag might not be your friend. But if you're after a teeny tiny, super lightweight pack that you can throw in your car for spontaneous adventuring or stuff in your carry-on for that trip to Europe, the Osprey Ultralight is a solid companion.

Read review: Osprey Ultralight Stuff Pack

This view does not suck ... testing out packs on Jackson Lake. We hiked  biked  paddled (but thankfully didn't swim!) in these bags to help you find the best one for your next mountain adventure.
This view does not suck ... testing out packs on Jackson Lake. We hiked, biked, paddled (but thankfully didn't swim!) in these bags to help you find the best one for your next mountain adventure.

Why You Should Trust Us


Our panel of expert testers for this review is led by Cam MacKenzie Ring and Maggie Brandenburg. Cam is no stranger to the day excursion and the type of gear needed for such an outing. She spends her days exploring the sandstone landscape around Las Vegas with her two boys. Cam is also a five-year veteran of Yosemite Search and Rescue and an accomplished, 20-year climber with El Cap big wall routes on her resume. Maggie also spends much of her days wandering around in nature, exploring the Sierras and the vast deserts of Nevada with her adventure dog. She has over 15 years of wilderness guiding under her belt throughout the US, in the Caribbean islands, across the plains of southern Africa, and even the jungles of South America.

Maggie and Cam spent hours researching the many options available before selecting the most popular packs to test. Each year, as bags receive updates and new models are unveiled, they added promising contenders. By and large, testing and retesting of these packs was covered by field trials over the course of two successive summers. The five key metrics we used to judge them (Comfort, Features, Weight, Adjustability, and Durability) were evaluated in locations such as the Tetons, the Sierra Nevadas, Nevada's Spring Mountains, Yellowstone, the Bighorns, the Adirondacks, and even Iceland.

Related: How We Tested Daypacks For Women

Reach new heights with this lightweight  lightly structured pack from Gregory.

Analysis and Test Results


We tested these daypacks over several months using our side-by-side comparison process. We used them while hiking over many miles, both for short and long hikes and for a variety of activities, from paddle boarding to commuting. After testing, we rated each daypack on a variety of criteria, from comfort and adjustability to their features and durability. In the rest of this article, we'll go through our test metrics and highlight which models performed well in each. We'll also discuss what to look for when purchasing a daypack on a budget.

Related: Buying Advice for Daypacks For Women

From hiking to traveling to skiing  we tested these packs to the max to help you find the right bag for your lifestyle.
From hiking to traveling to skiing, we tested these packs to the max to help you find the right bag for your lifestyle.

Value


We frequently have to make tradeoffs when purchasing any type of gear, and a daypack is no different. We always try to test a range of products here at OutdoorGearLab to be able to recommend great products across the spectrum. While more money doesn't always get you a better product, we found that in this category, it does tend to pair you up with a more durable bag. But when it comes to comfort and ease of use, those seem to be less tied to a dollar sign.


The Editor's Choice, CamelBack Sequoia 22 is not cheap but it offers exceptional comfort, handy and versatile features, and good durability. It also is the only model we tested that includes a hydration bladder, which would typically add another $20-30 to your day bag set-up. We think this is a pretty good value for what you get. The Gonex 35L has a shockingly low price and though it loses a lot of the technical aspects and durability of many more expensive models, it still brings a decent level of comfort and usability to the table. For a little more durability and some of those more specific features, the REI Co-op Trail 25 adds a little more to the deal and still doesn't cost too much; much less than the comparable models we tested.

Comfort


When it comes to hiking, comfort is a key consideration for all of the gear that you wear from your head to your toes, and what's on your back is one of the most important pieces. An ill-fitting or minimally padded pack can make your 12-mile day hike less enjoyable. Yet we also balanced this metric against each bag's intended usage. A pack intended for those long day hikes compared to a pack intended to be portable enough to bring anywhere for a spontaneous jaunt are not exactly built for the same things. And yet both should be comfortable enough to not make you grumpy every time you use it. To balance these variable uses, we factored in the comfort rating as 25% of each model's overall score.


We evaluated this category based on several things: how well the padding actually "padded" our hips and shoulders, how well the hip belts helped carry the weight, how well the design helped keep us cool while hiking, and if any annoying design features impacted our comfort level. The standout in this metric is the CamelBak Sequoia. It is jam-packed full of padding in all the places we wanted it. It features long, wide hip belt wings with load-bearing straps that pull the weight of what you're carrying close to your back. Though it lacks a mesh backing, its unique design includes two horizontal channels across the back to allow airflow. We took long hikes loaded down with gear, and the Sequoia offered the stability and comfort we sought.

The CamelBak Sequoia is one of the most comfortable bags that we tested. We loaded it up with 3L of water  extra layers  a rain jacket  our large DSLR camera  and food for the day  and we never felt uncomfortable  even after 3 miles of uphill hiking to see the 3 000-year-old Bristlecone pines.
The CamelBak Sequoia is one of the most comfortable bags that we tested. We loaded it up with 3L of water, extra layers, a rain jacket, our large DSLR camera, and food for the day, and we never felt uncomfortable, even after 3 miles of uphill hiking to see the 3,000-year-old Bristlecone pines.

Other top contenders in this category are the Gregory Jade and Osprey Sirrus. The Jade features an open mesh back, well-padded lumbar area, supportive hip belt, and contoured shoulder straps. We loaded it up with 15-plus pounds of gear and went for long hikes, and we think it offers some of the best support of any model we tested. The Sirrus also offers a well-padded hip belt and shoulder straps, an innovative back panel design to aid in ventilation, and some internal framing to help keep the contents of the pack off our backs.

The Gregory Jade 28 is on the "large" side for a daypack  and you can carry quite a bit in it. As such  Gregory added many elements more commonly found in larger bags to help you be more comfortable  including a frame suspension and well-padded straps.
The Gregory Jade 28 is on the "large" side for a daypack, and you can carry quite a bit in it. As such, Gregory added many elements more commonly found in larger bags to help you be more comfortable, including a frame suspension and well-padded straps.

As you can see from the photo below, our high scorers for comfort are not your average pack from years past. These packs have a lot of design and technology put into them, and the results were great. The mesh on the Osprey Sirrus 24 and Deuter Futura 22 (left) never rubbed against us in an uncomfortable way (we did have a shirt on at all times), and it's impressive how much cooler our backs stayed even while hiking in the desert southwest in summer. The raised pads on the CamelBak Sequoia 22 (middle) also achieved the same result while still offering some padding in key places. Some packs, like the Lowe Alpine Aeon ND20, Gregory Maya 22 and Patagonia Nine Trails 26 (right), came close to this design, with mesh covering the padding, but the bulk of the pack still rests against our backs. This is not nearly as comfortable because it reduces airflow, and we can also feel the contents pushing into our backs.

Some of the innovative back designs in our test group (left to right): Deuter Futura 22  CamelBak Sequoia 22  and Patagonia Nine Trails 26.
Some of the innovative back designs in our test group (left to right): Deuter Futura 22, CamelBak Sequoia 22, and Patagonia Nine Trails 26.

Another design feature that affected our comfort on the trail is the hip belt. Most of the packs in this review have a load-bearing hip belt, but we still found a varying degree of comfort between some of them. The CamelBak Sequoia and Gregory Jade 28 have hip belts that cover our hip bones with a lot amount of padding. The Gregory Maya's hip belt also provides a good amount of coverage but has significantly thinner padding than the Sequoia or Jade. Some of the options we tested, like the Deuter Futura 22, Cotopaxi Luzon 24, and both REI models (the Trail 25 and Flash 18) have webbing-only hip belts. They'll help keep the bag from shifting around on your back, but don't transfer any of the load off of your shoulders. We felt less comfortable in all of those models when carrying a heavier load in them as a result. Both ultralight models we tested, the Osprey Ultralight and Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil, lack hip belts altogether but are best used for entirely different adventures than their "hippy" counterparts.

The difference between a load-bearing hipbelt (left) and a webbing one (right) is noticeable the more weight you carry. A load-bearing hipbelt can carry an estimated 80% of the load  saving your shoulders (and your sanity!) on the trail.
The difference between a load-bearing hipbelt (left) and a webbing one (right) is noticeable the more weight you carry. A load-bearing hipbelt can carry an estimated 80% of the load, saving your shoulders (and your sanity!) on the trail.

A final thing to consider for comfort is the cut of the shoulder straps. Women's specific models tend to have less space between the straps and more of an S-curve to them to accommodate a women's physique. If your shoulders are broader than the "average" woman's, you might find that the shoulder straps dig into your neck no matter how you adjust your pack. In that case, it's over to the men's section for you. Sometimes manufacturers go too far in tailoring to a woman's physique, and in Patagonia's case they overshot the mark with their new Nine Trails 26 model. The shoulder straps are cut so closely together that they dug into all of our testers' necks, making this the least comfortable option in this review. The photo below shows the Deuter Futura 22's well-spaced straps (left) compared to the too-close ones on the Patagonia Nine Trails 26 (right).

The Deuter Futura's shoulder straps are well-spaced but still curved to fit a woman's contours.
The Patagonia Nine Trails' shoulder straps are but too close together - who has a neck this small? The straps ended up pushing into our necks and made us uncomfortable.

Versatility


We consider the versatility of each pack as another key purchase consideration because no matter how comfortable a pack is, if it can't do the things you need it to do it's not going to serve you very well. And with a piece of gear like this, a lot of its versatility is tied up in the features it may or may not have and how functional they are. While some manufacturers seem to be throwing every possible feature they can imagine on a pack, not all of these features are particularly useful. For example, the REI Trail 25 has a daisy chain running down both sides of the back, but how useful is that? if you do use that webbing to hook a whole bunch of gear to your bag, you'll soon become a walking Christmas tree, which is neither sleek nor efficient. Alternatively, some relatively featureless packs can be incredibly versatile by packing down into a teeny tiny little pouch that fits into your pocket, like the Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil.


As you can see, we liked the versatility and features of our Editors' Choice winner CamelBak Sequoia 22 the best. There are many reasons why we rated this pack so high, and we'll begin with the hip belt pockets. This handy feature has been on the rise in the last few years, and we want to hug whoever first thought of the idea, particularly in the age of the smartphone. Even if you're one of those who can ignore your dinging phone or who puts it in airplane mode every time you head out on the trail, let's be honest, our cell phones are so much more than that. They're our cameras, our maps, our clocks, and our species identification resource. There's nothing more annoying than having to take off your pack and dig through it every time you want to capture that perfect flower, see how far you've come, or check your email.

We also love this feature for other knick knacks too, like lip balm or a quick snack, but it's mainly for our smartphones, and if a hip belt pocket is too small to fit a phone it's a big miss. We could squeeze our phone into nearly all of the hip belt pockets in this review (with the exception of the Gonex 35), though some were a tighter fit than others. Also, some of the hip belt pockets are made with solid nylon and others with mesh. Notably, the CamelBak Sequoia (pictured below) has by far the longest hip belt pockets and features two on each side, giving you plenty of room for your smartphone, compass, keys, lip balm, and a granola bar or two.


Another feature that we appreciate is a rain cover that stashes in a pocket in the bag somewhere. Several models in this review have one, including the Osprey Sirrus, REI Co-op Trail 25, Gregory Jade 28, Gonex 35 and Deuter Futura 22. Do you need this feature? That depends on where you live and where you like to hike. Rainstorms can happen even in the desert, and a rain cover will keep your extra layers, snacks, or big DSLR camera drier than a pack without one. They do add a few ounces to the overall weight of the bag, and while you might be tempted to take it out on clear days with no chance of rain, remember to put it back in!

We appreciated this rain cover while hiking around on a wet day in Yellowstone National Park. Our extra layers and snacks stayed dry  and the rain cover easily stashed back away once the skies cleared.
We appreciated this rain cover while hiking around on a wet day in Yellowstone National Park. Our extra layers and snacks stayed dry, and the rain cover easily stashed back away once the skies cleared.

Some packs also have specific holders for your trekking poles. Whether or not you like to hike with them is up to you, but if you do, having a way to stash them securely when you don't need them is a nice feature. The Osprey models have a "Stow-on-the-Go" attachment system that works well for times when you want to put the poles away quickly for a short period, say to scramble up a rock. You thread your poles up through the loop on the bottom of the pack and then under the loop on the shoulder strap. No taking off your pack required. However, your poles are now under your armpit and banging around your side. We found this to be tolerable for about five minutes.

The REI Trail 25 has tabs for securing the bottom of the poles and straps for the tops. Other packs, like the Mammut Lithia Speed, didn't have specific holders but did have two compression straps on either side, which works equally well. A single set of straps is usually not sufficient. Most of the packs we tested also have one ice axe holder, which seems like a standard addition to a daypack even though only a fraction of hikers even use one. If you need to hold two ice axes though, look for something with two loops like the Lowe Alpine Aeon.

Some of the different methods of carrying trekking poles. The Osprey Sirrus (right) secures them to the side and under your shoulder strap. This was a quick way of stowing your poles  but not as comfortable as the more traditional options found on the left and middle photos.
Some of the different methods of carrying trekking poles. The Osprey Sirrus (right) secures them to the side and under your shoulder strap. This was a quick way of stowing your poles, but not as comfortable as the more traditional options found on the left and middle photos.

Most of the models that we tested are hydration bladder compatible in various ways, but only one, the CamelBak Sequoia, actually came with a reservoir. Whether you prefer to drink from a bottle or a hose is a question of personal preference, though hydration aficionados avow that you'll stay better hydrated if you can take small sips of water more frequently from a hose without having to stop and drink from a bottle. It is handy for sports that require the use of your hands, like paddle boarding, biking, and even hiking with trekking poles.

Notably, the Gonex 35, while having many other fairly useful features and pockets, is not hydration compatible. It has a laptop sleeve in the main compartment which can fit a bladder if need be, but with no loop to hang it on and no hole to thread the hose through, it's not a great match. If having a hydration pouch is important to you, you might want to choose another pack. You should also consider where the bladder sits and the framing of the pack. For example, on the Gregory Maya 22 and Lowe Alpine Aeon ND20, the reservoir fits into a slot right next to your back, but there is no framing there, and as a result, a full 2 or 3L bladder will push into your back until you drink all of it.

Making use of the included hydration reservoir on the CamelBak Sequoia. It was easy to pop the nozzle in our mouth between strokes and then drink while still paddling.
Making use of the included hydration reservoir on the CamelBak Sequoia. It was easy to pop the nozzle in our mouth between strokes and then drink while still paddling.

A few packs stand out for having very few of the previously mentioned features but are still quite versatile due to their ability to pack up into their own very small pocket. The Osprey Ultralight Stuff Pack and Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil each weigh just a few ounces and each fold down into a package smaller than your fist. By cutting out features like a hip belt, extra pockets, and most loops and clips, these bags are instead versatile in that you can pack them in your luggage to Spain or keep them in your purse for an impromptu adventure.

Turn any chance outing into an adventure by keeping an ultralight pack on your person.
Turn any chance outing into an adventure by keeping an ultralight pack on your person.

Finally, some models have great features specific to one application. Our Top Pick for Around Town, the Osprey Tempest 20, has a great way of securing a bike helmet. You might not need that on a day hike, but if you need a pack for commuting to school or work, the "Lidlock" attachment is a great feature. You thread the plastic holder through your helmet, rotate it to lay flat on top, and the bungee holds it in place with no flopping around. The Gregory Maya 22 also features an exterior loop meant for a helmet, though its simple design will still let your helmet sway while you walk.

Hopping on a bike share rental to tour around a big city. The "LidLock" attachment for our helmet kept it secure while not riding.
Hopping on a bike share rental to tour around a big city. The "LidLock" attachment for our helmet kept it secure while not riding.

Weight


We like to consider the weight of all of our outdoor gear purchases. Whether it's our shoes, trekking poles, or packs, shaving ounces off our clothing and gear can quickly add up to large weight savings, which makes each mile that much easier to cover. Below you'll see the actual weight of each bag that we tested, with a nearly 2.5-pound difference between the heaviest and lightest daypacks in our review.


If there's one thing that we learned in this review, it's that it's hard to have it all in a daypack. Want a lot of padding with a frame that supports the weight you're carrying? Then you're going to end up with a heavier bag like the Gregory Jade 28. Want something lightweight that still has all the regular comforts? Then you might have to sacrifice on durability a little, as super thin nylon is not as durable in the long-term compared to a thicker (and therefore heavier) material. The lightest traditional pack in our review, the Mammut Lithia Speed 15, weighs only 19 ounces and is an excellent choice for minimalist hikers who like to move fast. But it is also one of the less comfortable packs that we tested, and the 70D nylon is on the thin side and might not withstand heavy use over time.

Moving fast in the wilderness in the Mammut Lithia Speed 15. We barely felt this lightweight pack on our backs  and it was a great choice for fast trail hikes/runs.
Moving fast in the wilderness in the Mammut Lithia Speed 15. We barely felt this lightweight pack on our backs, and it was a great choice for fast trail hikes/runs.

The Osprey Ultralight and Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil are the obvious winners in the weight category. At just 3.8 and 2.7 ounces respectively, it's hard to beat that kind of minimalist weight. However, that kind of weight comes at a high cost to these bags' comfort and durability. The Osprey still has lightly padded shoulder straps and two extra pockets, but the Ultra-Sil has cut out those features and even removed the zipper pulls. Neither bag has a hip belt and both are made of paper-thin nylon, that's just not as durable as thicker, bulkier packs we reviewed.

Ultralight packs cut weight and add portability  but is the trade-off in comfort and durability something you're willing to accept?
Ultralight packs cut weight and add portability, but is the trade-off in comfort and durability something you're willing to accept?

Two other notable packs in this metric are the REI Flash 18 and the Cotopaxi Luzon 24L. The Luzon weighs two ounces less than the Mammut but has an extra 9 liters of capacity! The REI Flash has an almost imperceptibly larger capacity than the Mammut (3 liters), but tips the scales at just 9 ounces! That being said, both the Flash and the Luzon are much less technical packs, trading comfort features like padded hip belts and ventilated back panels for lighter weight options like webbing hip belts and thinner nylon construction. If weight and packability are important to you, but you're not quite ready to take the leap to the ultra-thin packs, these are a good middle ground.

Lookin for light and fast without going ultralight and losing those features? There's a daypack for that too.
Lookin for light and fast without going ultralight and losing those features? There's a daypack for that too.

Ease of Use


Scoring how easy each pack is to use was a two-pronged endeavor. Firstly, we packed and unpacked them to see how easy their organization, zippers, and overall design were to use. And secondly, we evaluated their adjustability. Daypacks are notorious for not having as much adjustability as a full 60L backpacking pack. Many manufacturers only offer them in one size, and there's often limited options for further adjustment, like load-lifting straps on the shoulders or hip belt tensioners. We considered all these potential adjustable pieces and how they affected each bag's overall usability.


We found that packs with long zippers that extend far down the sides of the pack tend to be easier to load, unload, and find what you're looking for without dumping the whole thing on the ground. Additional pockets both inside and outside also help keep your things organized even during that Class 4 scramble. The Camelbak Sequoia has particularly long zippers and useful pockets that make it one of our favorites in this regard.

Long zippers and convenient pocket organization can make all the difference when you're hangry and searching for that last energy bar.
Long zippers and convenient pocket organization can make all the difference when you're hangry and searching for that last energy bar.

We are impressed with the models that had adjustable back panels. One of the most important things to getting a good fit is having the back panel line up with your torso length so that the shoulder straps and hip belt can be in the right place. If it's not, the hip belt won't work well, and you'll carry more of the load on your shoulders. Most of the packs in this review come in one size only, and the length of the torso seemed to range from 16-18 inches, so if you fall out of that range, you could be out of luck. The Osprey Sirrus, Gregory Jade, Gregory Maya, and Lowe Alpine Aeon are the four models in our test group that have an adjustable back, giving a range between 15 and 19 inches.

The adjustable back on the Osprey Sirrus lets you dial in the fit better for your torso length.
The adjustable back on the Osprey Sirrus lets you dial in the fit better for your torso length.

Some models do come in two sizes to try and cover a greater range of torso sizes, including the Gregory Jade, Patagonia Nine Trails 26, and the Osprey Tempest 20. We tested both of those in the larger sizes, as our two chief testers are 5'6" with a 19" torso and 5'4" with an 18" torso. While the Patagonia model fit both their back lengths well, the Tempest is still too small and the Jade nearly so. The hip belt on the Tempest and Nine Trails barely comes around to our hip bones, and it doesn't provide much support as a result. The Gregory Jade 28 has much better hip belt coverage.

While better than a webbing-only hip belt  some daypacks have very short padding that leaves us wanting more.
While better than a webbing-only hip belt, some daypacks have very short padding that leaves us wanting more.

We do appreciate that some packs have load-lifting straps on the shoulders, but we found that they are often ineffective. Once you've adjusted your hip belt and shoulder straps, the load-lifters are supposed to shift the weight closer your back and to stabilize your load while reducing the weight on your shoulders. For these straps to work, the body of the pack has to extend above the shoulder straps, which isn't usually the case with a daypack, since the body of the bag is so small. We really only noticed a slight difference using the load-lifters the Gregory Jade, likely because it's a slightly larger bag than the others we tested.

Load lifter straps are supposed to attach to your pack at a 45 degree angle upward to effectively do their job. This is difficult to do in a daypack.
Load lifter straps are supposed to attach to your pack at a 45 degree angle upward to effectively do their job. This is difficult to do in a daypack.

Durability


Lastly, we rated each different pack in this review for durability. Note that we couldn't get several year's worth of use on each bag in the space of just a few months of testing. Instead, we looked for signs of wear after several months of use that they did get. We combed through online user reviews to look for durability concerns and patterns from the hundreds of other day packers out there. And we also evaluated them based on our extensive experience with outdoor gear.


We are quite impressed with the durability of the Osprey Sirrus 24 and Camelbak Sequoia. Both of these packs use 210D nylon in the body and a double layer - 420D nylon on the bottom, as well as reinforced seams, thick adjustable straps, solid plastic pieces, and minimal mesh to snag on nature. The Gregory Jade and Maya are both also constructed of the same thick nylon with a double layer on the bottom, but we aren't quite as wowed by the vast amount of mesh each of these packs present for the world to snag on.

Not all daypacks will last forever  but having a double thick 420D nylon bottom (like the Osprey Sirrus on top) will certainly help!
Not all daypacks will last forever, but having a double thick 420D nylon bottom (like the Osprey Sirrus on top) will certainly help!

No pack will last forever, and some terrains are less forgiving than others. If you're hiking on well-maintained trails in "gentle" forest ecosystems, this might be less of a concern for you. If you're scrambling up craggy peaks or squeezing through sandy slot canyons, thicker material will offer more abrasion resistance, and you should consider this when making a purchase decision.

Hiking in a "gentle" forest on well-maintained trails? You might not have to worry much about durability. Always consider the terrain that you'll be using your gear in when deciding what purchase criteria are most important to you.
Hiking in a "gentle" forest on well-maintained trails? You might not have to worry much about durability. Always consider the terrain that you'll be using your gear in when deciding what purchase criteria are most important to you.

Conclusion


Finding the perfect daypack can feel like an overwhelming challenge. With so many models, even from the same manufacturer (Osprey alone makes eight different daypacks in multiple volume choices), it can be challenging to find the perfect one for you. We hope our extensive testing and ratings helped you in that quest.


Maggie Brandenburg and Cam McKenzie Ring