The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

The Best Climbing Slings and Runners

Pulling the wild and fun roof crux at the top of pitch two of Levitation 29  with the Sterling Dyneema runner helps keep the rope running smoothly.
By Andy Wellman ⋅ Senior Review Editor
Sunday August 18, 2019
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Are you looking for the best climbing slings available today but aren't sure which ones to buy? Whether you are intending to use them for multi-pitch sandstone or granite trad climbs, big wall voyages, or alpine shiver fests, we are here to help. Our expert testers have researched over 30 of the best and most popular slings on the market, choosing 12 for inclusion in this comparative review. We tested them on big routes in the Bugaboos of British Columbia, Yosemite Valley, Eldorado Canyon, and Red Rocks, learning which ones we prefer for different situations. Whether you want the best, the lightest, or simply the most affordable, we have the perfect recommendations for you.


Top 12 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 12
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Awards Editors' Choice Award     
Price $6.95 at Backcountry
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$12.95 at Amazon$6.95 at REI
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$10.95 at Backcountry$8.50 at REI
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Pros Low weight, very thin, handles great, affordableVery light, low bulk, easy to manipulate, very small bar tackLight weight, low bulk, knots untie relatively easily, affordableCovered sewn bar tack, thin and lightLow price, light weight despite width, small bar tack
Cons Weighted knots harder to untie than thicker slingsHigh price, harder than some to untie knotsNot as soft a handle as other top scorersExpensive, rubberized covering adds weight and feels weird sliding through handsAbrasive edges, wide for the weight
Bottom Line The best climbing sling due to its great handle and low weight and width.A top-notch sling at a top-shelf priceA fantastic lightweight flat sling that is also affordableA great sling that costs more than it seems like it shouldA solid sling at a fantastic price
Rating Categories Mammut Contact Dyneema Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling Black Diamond Dynex Runner Sterling Dyneema Sling Trango Low Bulk 11mm Sling
Handle (25%)
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7
Knot Test (25%)
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Alpine Quickdraw Test (20%)
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Specs Mammut Contact... Petzl Pur'Anneau... Black Diamond... Sterling Dyneema... Trango Low Bulk...
Type of Fiber Dyneema High-Modulus Polyethalene Dynex Dyneema Dyneema
Measured weight 19g 19g 20g 22g 20g
Width Tested 8mm 10mm 10mm 10mm 11mm
Length Tested 60cm 60cm 60cm 60cm 60cm
Strength 22Kn 22Kn 22Kn 22Kn 22Kn
Widths Available 8mm 10mm 10mm 10mm; 12mm 11mm
Lengths Available 60cm; 120cm 60cm; 120cm; 180cm 30cm; 60cm; 120cm; 240cm 10"; 24"; 30"; 48" 30cm; 60cm; 120cm

Best Overall Climbing Sling


Mammut Contact Dyneema


Editors' Choice Award

$6.95
(23% off)
at Backcountry
See It

85
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Handle - 25% 9
  • Knot Test - 25% 5
  • Alpine Quickdraw Test - 20% 10
  • Weight - 15% 10
  • Bulk - 15% 10
Type of Fiber: Dyneema | Weight: 19g
Very light
Super thin
Least amount of friction and easiest to triple up into alpine quickdraw
Knots tend to become welded and harder to untie quickly
More expensive than nylon

The Mammut Contact Sling is our Editors' Choice award winner as the best overall climbing sling because it combines a winning combination of super light weight, low bulk, easy deployment, and comfortable handle. It is made of Dyneema, known for being the strongest fiber on earth, pound for pound significantly stronger than steel. It is made of tubular rather than flat webbing, allowing it to be a mere 8mm wide for the same 22kN strength rating, compared to the second thinnest sling checking in at 10mm of flat webbing, and is also the lightest sling in this review, weighing a mere 19 grams. Due to its super low profile, we find that it slides through carabiners easier than any other sling, allowing us to triple it up into an alpine quickdraw with the least amount of hassle, aided in part by the superior method of stitching together the two ends to make the sling.

Of course, we discovered a few downsides to this low-profile sling as well. Because it is so incredibly thin, we find that figure-eight knots tied into the sling have a propensity to weld themselves together very tightly when weighted, making them quite hard to untie quickly. Like all Dyneema slings, tying knots in the sling greatly reduces its strength. Dyneema is also non-elastic, meaning that a climber has to be extra careful not to load the sling statically or the forces generated may be stronger than the piece of protection it is attached to can hold. These are minor concerns, however, easily mitigated by attentive use, and the benefits of Dyneema far outweigh its detractions. Since climbing is a game of getting you (and your stuff) up tall cliffs and mountains, having the lightest, smallest, and best performing gear can only make that task easier and more enjoyable. That's why we recommend the Mammut Contact Sling as the best choice.

Read review: Mammut Contact Sling

Best Bang for the Buck


Black Diamond Nylon Sewn Runner


Best Buy Award

$3.95
(21% off)
at REI
See It

55
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Handle - 25% 9
  • Knot Test - 25% 4
  • Alpine Quickdraw Test - 20% 5
  • Weight - 15% 4
  • Bulk - 15% 4
Type of Fiber: Nylon | Weight: 37 g
Very affordable
Nylon allows for elastic stretch when weighted
Silky smooth texture is friendly on the hands
Relatively heavy and bulky
Hard to untie knots once they are weighted

In the debate between whether Nylon or Dyneema is the best material for climbing slings, Nylon has a few distinct advantages. The most obvious is the fact that it is far more affordable than Dyneema, allowing us to recognize the Black Diamond Nylon Sewn Runner as our Best Bang for the Buck Award winner. This sling retails for less than half the price of some of the others in this review, and if you are forking over the cash to purchase a selection of slings that will get you to the top of a route in the Red Rocks or Yosemite (8-14!), then the cash saved could be significant (or at least enough for pizza and beer after your successful climb). The other main advantage Nylon has is that it dynamically stretches up to 30% when weighted in a fall. This can help reduce the impact of a high factor fall close to the belay, and while the rope does most of this work regardless of which type of fibers make up your climbing slings, it never hurts to have more shock absorption built into your climbing systems. This elasticity also makes Nylon a safer choice for use in anchors, while aid climbing or climbing a via ferrata, or any situation where the potential to fall directly onto a piece without a rope to absorb the impact is present.

Of course, Nylon has its downsides as well, or we would have never seen such a preponderance of Dyneema slings flood the market. The main ones are that in order to meet the minimum strength requirements for slings (22kN), a lot more Nylon is needed than the much stronger Dyneema. So Nylon slings are wider, bulkier, and especially heavier than their counterparts. These attributes compound when it comes to performance, because with more material, there is more friction when passing slings through biners, making Nylon slings slightly harder to triple up into alpine quickdraws, and untie once knots have been weighted. These negatives do matter, but only you can decide by how much when considering the price savings. After all, climbers have been climbing far radder objectives than you or me for at least the last 50 years using Nylon slings (and a lot of other antiquated equipment). For the average climber, a few Nylon slings on the rack to compliment a larger amount of Dyneema ones can only add versatility, while a budget conscious climber should be just fine going with only Nylon.

Read review: Black Diamond Nylon Sewn Runner

Top Pick for Building Anchors


Metolius Open Loop Sling


Top Pick Award

$5.95
(54% off)
at Backcountry
See It

73
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Handle - 25% 7
  • Knot Test - 25% 8
  • Alpine Quickdraw Test - 20% 7
  • Weight - 15% 8
  • Bulk - 15% 6
Type of Fiber: Dyneema/Nylon Weave | Weight: 47g for 120cm sling
Blend of Dyneema and Nylon fibers offers advantages of each
Very easy to untie knots after they have been weighted
Comes in a large selection of lengths and widths for anchor building versatility
Affordable
Bulkier than some other 11mm slings
Slightly abrasive edges

While double-length slings are most commonly used to extend pieces of protection while on lead to reduce rope drag, quadruple or even longer slings are commonly used to help equalize multiple protection pieces into safe anchors. On a multi-pitch climb, it's common for each climber to carry 1-2 extra long slings for this purpose, and from our testing, we think the Metolius Open Loop Sling offers the best attributes to be an ideal anchor sling. While all Dyneema slings are joined with a small amount of Nylon on the edges to give it color and suppleness, the Open Loop Sling features a more equal balance of the two, affording some elastic stretch while still featuring the strength-to-weight ratio of Dyneema. It comes in a wide selection of different widths and lengths, making it easier to choose exactly what size sling you prefer for building your anchors. We tested the 11mm wide, 120cm long version, and thought it was one of the very best performers when it comes to easily tying and especially untying knots that have been weighted, a very critical consideration for an anchor building sling.

There are a few downsides to this sling, mainly that tying knots in a sling, which is quite common when building equalized anchors, reduces the strength of the sling. However, considering that the sling is rated to forces of 22kN, equal to 4,945lbs., it is extremely hard to conceive of a situation where a sling of even slightly reduced strength would be compromised, so this complaint is tiny. Other small downsides are the fact that it is a bit thicker than other slings we tested that are also 11mm wide, making it slightly bulkier, and it also has a slightly rougher edge to it than the tubular design of the BlueWater Titan Sling, another solid choice for anchor building. In the end, however, these concerns are far outweighed by the ease of untying knots and the myriad of choices, not to mention the very reasonable price, making this the ideal choice for your anchor building needs.

Read review: Metolius Open Loop Sling

Top Pick for Using as Pro


Edelrid Aramid Cord Sling


Top Pick Award

$15.95
at Amazon
See It

66
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Handle - 25% 6
  • Knot Test - 25% 9
  • Alpine Quickdraw Test - 20% 6
  • Weight - 15% 3
  • Bulk - 15% 8
Type of Fiber: Aramid Cord | Weight: 43g
Aramid has very high abrasion resistance
Stiffness makes it easy to sling horns just out of reach, or push through threads
High heat resistance makes for a good rappel backup
A bit more bulky and harder to triple up than softer slings
Heavier than others

While climbing slings are most often used to extend pieces of protection while leading, whether that is bolts, cams, or nuts, another usage is as protection themselves. Slings can be wrapped or tied around horns or flakes, or threaded through pockets when that is a possibility. The best sling that we have tested is designed specifically for this purpose — the Edelrid Aramid Cord Sling — which we have awarded our Top Pick. Rather than being made of flat or tubular webbing, this sling is 6mm thick cord made with Aramid fibers, more commonly recognized by the brand name Kevlar. These strong fibers have very high abrasion resistance, making them the ideal sheath for a sling that may wrap over sharp edges. The stiff, almost rigid, construction is in stark contrast to the floppy and supple handle of most slings, making it easier to thread and place one-handed while gripping the rock with the other hand. Add to that Aramid's high heat resistance, something not found with dyneema or nylon slings, and these also make a great rappel backup, or prussic cord should you need one in an emergency.

The downsides to these slings are that they are a bit more bulky and heavier than normal slings. The rigidity, combined with the rather large thermo-molded covering over the sewn ends, means you can't just crumple these up into a ball to toss into the pack. It also means that they don't sit as low profile on the harness when you have them tripled up into an alpine quickdraw. And like dyneema slings, they have very little dynamic give. These are small prices to pay for greatly increased versatility. Although we were rebuffed in our attempts to have a "testing" trip to the Italian Dolomites funded, they have been designed with this style of climbing in mind — traditionally protected limestone where the rock can be very sharp, and pocket or tufa threads are plentiful. For those of us in the States, slinging horns and chicken heads on the granite of the lower Merced in Yosemite or the domes of Cochise Stronghold would be ideal uses. They would also be a quick solution for v-thread anchors on multi-pitch ice climbs where their rigidity would make threading nice and fast.

Read Review: Edelrid Aramid Cord Sling

Top Pick for Clipping Into a Belay


Beal Dynamic Sling


Top Pick Award

$9.71
(25% off)
at Backcountry
See It

51
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Handle - 25% 6
  • Knot Test - 25% 8
  • Alpine Quickdraw Test - 20% 4
  • Weight - 15% 1
  • Bulk - 15% 4
Type of Fiber: Dynamic Rope | Weight: 78g
Features the same dynamic stretch as a climbing rope
Ideal for use clipping into anchors
Core fibers protected by a sheath
Heavy and bulky compared to other slings
Can't carry it as an alpine quickdraw

It is very common while multi-pitch climbing to simply clip into the belay using a sling, or to use a sling to clip oneself into a rappel anchor on the way down while you pull the ropes to rig the next rappel. We have done this literally thousands of times, usually with dyneema slings, because that's normally what we have on hand. But for anyone who does this, we recommend watching this extremely informative, and sobering, video made by DMM. The takeaway is that with even a little bit of slack in the system, it is very easy to generate catastrophic forces that can snap a sling, especially if there is a knot tied in it. To alleviate these potential concerns, tie into the anchor using the lead rope, or use the Beal Dynamic Sling. This sling is a sewn piece of 8.3mm climbing rope that has all of the shock absorbing properties of a normal rope, making it ideal for tethering into the anchor. Beal has tested this sling for >20 factor one falls and >8 factor two falls, compared to one and zero of the same types of fall before breakage for dyneema slings. So, whether you are rappelling, are the second clipping in for just a moment while the belay device is switched so you can lead, or are leading in blocks, tethering in using the Beal Dynamic Sling is much safer than using a regular sling, whether dyneema or nylon.

The downside to this sling is that it is bulky and heavy compared to normal slings, by a wide margin. We found it to be too bulky to easily triple up into an alpine quickdraw, so had to carry it over the shoulder, or tied in a knot on the harness. The spot where the two ends are sewn together is also quite large and bulky and doesn't easily slide through carabiners. Basically, this is not a sling we would buy simply to use as a normal sling, but we think that it is a versatile choice for use while clipping into anchors, which is why we awarded it our Top Pick Award.

Read Review: Beal Dynamic Sling


Testing climbing slings high on El Capitan.
Testing climbing slings high on El Capitan.

Why You Should Trust Us


This expert tested review is led by Andy Wellman, a climber of over 22 years. He has been a senior review editor at OutdoorGearLab for the last five years, and used to own and run Greener Grass Publishing, where he produced and wrote rock climbing and bouldering guidebooks to the Southeast, including Stone Fort Bouldering. He has a wealth of climbing knowledge gained from hard-earned experience in every discipline of climbing. He has also experienced first hand the style, ethics, local community, and excellent stone at the vast majority of famous climbing areas in this country, as well as a few abroad, choosing to home base at different periods in the climbing meccas of Boulder, Rifle, Chattanooga, Ouray, and now Terrebonne, OR, a stone's throw from Smith Rock. It's safe to say that he has used and abused a whole lot of climbing gear over that time! Adding to his knowledge is that of Chris McNamara, owner and founder of OutdoorGearLab and SuperTopo Guidebooks, who became famous for climbing countless frightening aid routes on El Cap before he was even old enough for college.

Because of how thin it is  this sling cinches down tighter than any other when you tie a knot in it and weight it  although its slippery nature helps one to untie it. Regardless  we don't recommend using this for anchor building  or for tying knots.
Speed record holder Stefan Greibel seconds pitch 3 of the Naked Edge  a wild and wandering pitch made easier with long slings  on a not-speed ascent in December!
The three widest slings in this review on top: The yellow BD Nylon (18mm)  Blue Sterling Nylon (17mm)  and the red and white BlueWater Titan (13mm)  with the thinnest sling in this review for comparison on the bottom  the Mammut Contact (8mm).

Testing climbing slings involves a whole lot of going climbing. For this review, we tested slings side-by-side on long multi-pitch routes in Red Rocks and Eldorado Canyon, as well as in the alpine rock climbing paradise of the Bugaboos in British Columbia. This testing allows us to get a feel for the strengths and weaknesses of each product, and to notice what we like and don't like about them. We also conduct extensive internet research, attempting to identify what other climbers like and don't like, then putting it to the test. To put products on the spot, we most frequently went out to our local climbing area of Smith Rock, to play around on the traditional cracks of the lower gorge, or the bolted multi-pitches on welded tuff. Lastly, we perform side-by-side tests, such as weighing all products on the scale, or tying the same knots in them and weighting them, one after the other so we can most closely notice the sometimes very subtle differences between the performance of each one. The end result is this exhaustively researched, heavily considered, and carefully tested review.

Related: How We Tested Climbing Slings

Analysis and Test Results


Climbing slings are loops of webbing that are sewn together using a special bar tacking machine, and are rated to a minimum force of 22kN (or 4,945 lbs.). Slings are generally made out of two different material fibers — Nylon, which was the most common until the late 1990's, and Dyneema, a modern thermoplastic fiber made of polyethylene that is among the strongest known to man. Dyneema is a brand name, and while there are numerous other fiber types with different names also included in this test (i.e. Spectra, Dynex), they are all extremely similar in characteristics and are all made with high-molecular-weight polyethylene. Sometimes we will simply refer to all of these different fiber types as Dyneema. Slings come in many different lengths for different purposes. The most commonly used length is 60cm (or 24"), referred to as "double-length" or "shoulder-length," most frequently used to extend a piece of climbing protection to reduce rope drag on the leader. Another popular length is 120cm (48"), a "quadruple-length" sling that is most frequently used for equalizing multiple pieces of protection in an anchor. While these are the most common uses for slings, only your creativity can limit how many potential uses they have while climbing.

Related: Buying Advice for Climbing Slings

The lower gorge of Smith Rock is a trad climbing paradise of basalt columns and cracks  here testing slings on lead of the hand crack Original Sin.
The lower gorge of Smith Rock is a trad climbing paradise of basalt columns and cracks, here testing slings on lead of the hand crack Original Sin.

For this review, we tested the majority of the slings in double-length, while a couple that seemed to have characteristics that would flourish for anchor building we tested in 120cm length. We tested and rated each sling for five different metrics that affect a sling's performance: Handle, the Knot Test, the Alpine Quickdraw Test, Weight, and Bulk. Each of these metrics, including why they matter, how we tested for them, and which slings were the top performers, are described in greater detail below. In all cases, slings were rated compared to the competition, so if a sling received a low score, it doesn't mean that it is not capable of that function, but rather that it performed worse than the others we compared it against. Some products with lower scores, for instance the two cord slings that we tested, have very compelling reasons to buy them, despite not being the highest scorers. While the scores are a handy tool, we encourage you to think carefully about your own specific needs.

Leading one of the stellar face pitches on Levitation 29  Eagle Wall  Red Rocks during a beautiful January day. A large selection of slings is essential to success on this route.
Leading one of the stellar face pitches on Levitation 29, Eagle Wall, Red Rocks during a beautiful January day. A large selection of slings is essential to success on this route.

Value


An important consideration with any product is value. We don't rate for value, but also don't want to leave you in the dark when it comes to figuring out where your money is best spent. In general, we found that the price of Dyneema (or a similar material) slings are closely bunched together, with little differences in cost between different products. For these, the best value will clearly be to choose the slings that performed the best. However, for the best overall value, the wisest move would be to look to Nylon slings. These generally cost less than half of what the average Dyneema sling does, allowing a new climber to outfit themselves with a large selection at a considerable savings.


Handle


Handle is a term that is often used to describe the feel of a climbing rope in ones hands, and we use it here to assess slings with pretty much the same meaning. Think of handle as how comfortable or friendly a sling feels as it slides between your fingers, as well as whether it is soft and pliable or rather stiff and cord-like. While this criteria is mildly subjective, we can surely all agree that what feels softer and more comfortable to hold in ones hands is more enjoyable to use on a daily basis or in repetitive situations than something that is abrasive, rough, or stiff. Handle, then, is an assessment of which slings feel the best as we are using them.


Most of our assessment for handle came from using this slings repeatedly on long multi-pitch rock climbs, noticing along the way which ones were the most enjoyable, and which ones struck us as less friendly to use. We also compared them side-by-side on the ground, taking notes about how they feel as the slide through the hands, whether they have abrasive or smooth edges, and how smooth and low profile the bar tacking is.

The Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling tied with a slip knot around a large chicken head high on the Resolution Arete on Mt. Wilson  Red Rocks. By slinging a horn such as this one  a sling goes from simply extending the protection to providing the protection.
The Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling tied with a slip knot around a large chicken head high on the Resolution Arete on Mt. Wilson, Red Rocks. By slinging a horn such as this one, a sling goes from simply extending the protection to providing the protection.

In the end, three slings simply feel nicer than the rest, although the scores for all of these products ended up fairly bunched together as it was hard to definitively declare some slings far superior to others. The Mammut Contact Sling, our Editors' Choice winner, was the lone Dyneema fiber sling that we felt was friendlier than the others. However, both of the Nylon slings we tested — the Black Diamond Nylon Sewn Runner as well as the Sterling Nylon Sewn Runner — also scored at the top for handle. Nylon is just softer, more slippery and comforting in the hands, without any rough edges, and is also supremely supple, making these slings a top choice if handle is a priority. As one of the more important characteristics to the performance of a sling, we weighted it as 25% of a product's final score.

All 10 slings that we tested for this review side-by-side for comparison  arranged from thinnest on top to thickest on the bottom. From the top: Mammut Contact  Petzl Pur'Anneau  BD Dynex  Sterling Dyneema  Camp USA 11mm  Trango Low Bulk  Metolius Open Loop  BlueWater Titan  Sterling Nylon  and BD Nylon.
All 10 slings that we tested for this review side-by-side for comparison, arranged from thinnest on top to thickest on the bottom. From the top: Mammut Contact, Petzl Pur'Anneau, BD Dynex, Sterling Dyneema, Camp USA 11mm, Trango Low Bulk, Metolius Open Loop, BlueWater Titan, Sterling Nylon, and BD Nylon.

Knot Test


In the majority of climbing situations a sling will be left un-knotted to slide freely through a carabiner. However, there are also countless other situations, especially when building and equalizing anchors, that one might want to add a knot to a sling. When it comes to knots, and especially untying them, not all slings perform the same. Compared to climbing ropes, slings have a propensity to become "welded" after being weighted, which essentially means they cinch up so tight that you can't get them untied. To assess and describe how easy it is to tie and untie knots in a particular sling, we performed some knot tests.


The two most common knots that climbers tie in their slings are the figure-eight on a bight, the clove hitch. We tied each of these slings into these knots on the same carabiner, then weighted them, to see how tight they got and assess their relative ease of untying. As a relatively simple knot, the clove hitch rarely presented any sort of problem to loosen and untie — simply wiggling it back and forth a few times is enough to loosen it so it can be untied. The figure-eight, however, is a whole different story. As any climber who has taken a lead fall on a climbing rope knows, this knot has the ability to cinch up very tight, and with so much friction built in, can be very hard to untie. How easy this knot was to untie became the predominant factor in a sling's score for this metric.

The Metolius Open Loop Sling equalizing two bolts in this anchor in Red Rocks. As the easiest sling to untie knots in once they have been weighted  we recommend this as our Top Pick for Anchor Building.
The Metolius Open Loop Sling equalizing two bolts in this anchor in Red Rocks. As the easiest sling to untie knots in once they have been weighted, we recommend this as our Top Pick for Anchor Building.

Our testing reveals that the thickest Nylon slings, as well as the very thinnest Mammut Contact Sling, present the most difficulty once a knot has been weighted. If you are in a hurry to move on from your belay when it's your turn, be sure to think carefully before you incorporate figure-eights tied into these types of slings. On the other hand, there is a sweet spot among the medium width Dyneema slings, allowing them to be tied into knots and untied easier than those just described. The easiest slings for this are the Metolius Open Loop Sling and the Camp USA 11mm Express Dyneema Runner, making them excellent choices for use at anchors. These two slings are stiffer and flatter than many of the others, preventing them from welding so tightly together, and allowing for much quicker untying upon leaving the belay. The absolute easiest slings to untie once they have been knotted and weighted are the two cord-style slings. In particular, the Edelrid Aramid Cord Sling, with its tightly woven 6mm construction, is simply a breeze to untie once it has been knotted. The Knot Test accounts for 25% of a product's overall score.

A girth hitch is a very common knot  and a simple way to join one sling to another. It is easy to tie with any sling  and is also just as easy to untie.
A girth hitch is a very common knot, and a simple way to join one sling to another. It is easy to tie with any sling, and is also just as easy to untie.

Alpine Quickdraw Test


Climbing slings are long and dangly and present a bit of a problem when it comes to carrying a bunch of them without allowing them to get caught up in all your other gear. Draping them over one shoulder and around the neck is a common solution to this problem, but even more popular is the Alpine Quickdraw. An alpine quickdraw is a double-length sling that has been tripled up with a carabiner on each end so that it is roughly the same length, and functions in the same way, as your average quickdraw. It also allows slings to be easily racked on a gear loop on the harness, which can be easier to access and deploy quickly mid-lead than unslinging one that is around your neck and shoulder. By removing the carabiner from the free hanging end, then re-clipping it into only one strand of the tripled sling and pulling, you very quickly switch from alpine quickdraw into a full-length runner ready to clip to the rope, so this method has the added versatility of being usable at two different lengths.

To make an alpine quickdraw: 1) Begin with an extended double length runner and two biners. 2) Slide one biner through the other one. 3) Clip that biner to the loop created. 4) Pull both biners apart tightly to equalize tripled up sling.
To make an alpine quickdraw: 1) Begin with an extended double length runner and two biners. 2) Slide one biner through the other one. 3) Clip that biner to the loop created. 4) Pull both biners apart tightly to equalize tripled up sling.

To extend an alpine quickdraw into a double-length runner: 1) Begin with a tripled up alpine quickdraw. 2) Completely unclip bottom biner from all sling loops. 3) Clip biner to only one of the three loops. 4) Pull until extended.
To extend an alpine quickdraw into a double-length runner: 1) Begin with a tripled up alpine quickdraw. 2) Completely unclip bottom biner from all sling loops. 3) Clip biner to only one of the three loops. 4) Pull until extended.

For this test, we took each sling and repeatedly tripled them up into alpine quickdraws, then released them again into full-length slings, and rated them based on how well they performed this task. We deducted points for any hang-ups or issues we encountered. There are two main factors that dictate how easy it is to form or extend an alpine quickdraw. First is the width and bulk of the sling. Wider slings are more likely to overlap each other when tripled up in the crotch of a carabiner, creating friction and often preventing the sling from equalizing its length when forming the quickdraw. The second is the length of the bar tacking, which varies from sling to sling, despite equal strength requirements. Longer and bulkier bar tacking has a greater propensity to hang up on one of the two carabiners, once again preventing the sling from equalizing itself when pulled taut into an alpine quickdraw.


It should come as no surprise that the top performers for this category are the thinnest slings that have the lowest profile bar tacking. Once again, the Mammut Contact Sling, at a mere 8mm of width and featuring an innovative bar tacking pattern that is the lowest profile of all those tested, is the top performer. The very light and narrow Petzl Pur-Anneau Sling and the Sterling Dyneema Sling, which includes a small bar tack covered in a rubberized plastic cover to eliminate sewn tabs that can hang up on carabiners, are the second highest performers in this category. Despite other solid advantages, the two cord slings performed the poorest at this task. In particular, the Beal Dynamic Sling, at 8.3mm of rope width, is borderline too fat to easily fit through the carabiners, and also doesn't hang down straight once tripled up. This test accounts for 20% of a product's overall score.

Kevin demonstrating how its done -- creating an alpine quickdraw out of the Camp USA 11mm sling  while racking up for an ascent of Zebra-Zion at Smith Rock.
Kevin demonstrating how its done -- creating an alpine quickdraw out of the Camp USA 11mm sling, while racking up for an ascent of Zebra-Zion at Smith Rock.

Weight


Slings are simply single loops of thin webbing, so as you would expect, they are very light pieces of gear. Compared to the weight of a pair of shoes, a cam (or a whole rack of cams), or even a locking carabiner, slings present what may seem to be an insignificant cost in weight while climbing a route. However, it is our belief that no opportunity to cut weight while not compromising on performance should be overlooked, especially when climbing, as every single thing on your body has to be held by your fingers. Since you can buy lighter slings that are equally as strong as heavier ones, why wouldn't you?


Let's be real, though, and admit that we don't think the weight of your slings is going to be the deciding factor between sending a big route or not. In fact, in order to be able to tell the difference between these slings most precisely, we had to weigh them in grams rather than ounces. At times there was only a difference of 1g between different slings, and even if you multiplied this difference by 10 (for the number of slings you are carrying on your route), 10g in the best case, or 190g if comparing the lightest to the heaviest (19g x 10 slings), is still only a difference of .35oz to 3.17oz, depending on which slings you choose to buy. Worth pointing out is that weight is one of the key advantages of choosing a Dyneema sling over a Nylon one, as Dyneema is significantly stronger at the same weight, meaning for a comparable strength sling, they can be far lighter and thinner than Nylon.

At a mere 19g  this is tied with the lightest slings in our review. However  it is still 5g heavier than the 14g listing on Mammut's website... What gives Mammut?
At a mere 19g, this is tied with the lightest slings in our review. However, it is still 5g heavier than the 14g listing on Mammut's website... What gives Mammut?

To determine a sling's weight, we ignored what the manufacturers published on their websites and instead weighed each sling on our independent scale immediately upon receipt, before we used them and any dirt had a chance to impact the results. We found the Mammut Contact Sling to be the lightest at a mere 19g, although this was a fair bit heavier than the 14g figure quoted on Mammut's website, a discrepancy that we don't understand. Also weighing in at 19g is the Petzl Pur-Annueau Sling, while the Black Diamond Dynex Runner and the Trango Low Bulk 11 Sling are only 1g heavier, weighing in at 20g. The heaviest slings are the ones made out of cord, with the Edelrid Aramid Cord weighing in at 43g, and the Beal Dynamic Sling weighing a whopping 78g. These cord slings have specific advantages that most likely preclude worrying about their extra weight, and regardless we would likely only carry one (Beal) or a few (Edelrid), at most anyway. Weight accounts for 15% of a product's final score.

Bulk


Due to differences in fiber and the pattern of the weave, different slings come in different weights, thicknesses, and shapes, despite the fact that they are all of equal strength. The width of the slings that we tested ranges from 8mm on the small end, up to 18mm on the larger end, and 6mm to 8.3mm when talking about cord. Some slings are made of a flat piece of webbing, while others are tubular in shape, which means they are thicker. Bulk assess for how small and compact a sling can be.


Bulk is similar to weight when it comes to deciding how important it really is. On the one hand, the difference between a fat sling and a very thin sling, even when you multiply it out by an entire rack of 10 or so slings, is not very significant, simply because we are talking about thin strips of webbing here. But on the other hand, if you consider the differences in terms of percentage, then a Nylon 18mm wide sling is well over 200% as bulky as a super thin Dyneema sling, and if you have the opportunity to purchase something that is less bulky without compromising on performance, then why wouldn't you? Less bulky slings will pack down smaller in your approach pack, take up less space racked together on your harness, and also slide over carabiners easier as you deploy them.

Showing four different widths of slings for comparison. On top is the 8mm wide Mammut Contact  then the 10mm BD Dynex  the 13mm BlueWater Titan  and the 18mm BD Nylon on the bottom.
Showing four different widths of slings for comparison. On top is the 8mm wide Mammut Contact, then the 10mm BD Dynex, the 13mm BlueWater Titan, and the 18mm BD Nylon on the bottom.

These two slings  the Trango Low Bulk 11 on top and the Camp USA 11mm on the bottom are the exact same width - 11mm. Clearly the one on the bottom is far thicker  though  one of the things we considered when assessing for bulk.
These two slings, the Trango Low Bulk 11 on top and the Camp USA 11mm on the bottom are the exact same width - 11mm. Clearly the one on the bottom is far thicker, though, one of the things we considered when assessing for bulk.

To assess for bulk, we started by comparing the widths of each sling, and then also factored in their thicknesses, which often has to do with whether they are of flat or tubular design, or made of cord. Less bulky slings score higher for this metric. Once again, the Mammut Contact Sling is the least bulky, as its 8mm width is two millimeters slimmer than the next closest competitor, despite the fact that it is of tubular design, which almost negates the differences. The Black Diamond Dynex Sewn Runner and the Petzl Pur'Anneau Sling are very close seconds when it comes to bulk, and received the second most points. The Nylon options we tested, which need to be around 17mm wide to be equally as strong as the much thinner Dyneema options, are of course bulkier. Bulkiest of all are the cord slings, especially the Beal Dynamic Sling, which is as thick as a piece of climbing rope, and is also rather stiff. Bulk accounts for 15% of a product's final score.

Andy reaching the belay atop pitch 9 or 10 of Resolution Arete  Red Rocks  having cleaned many slings along the way and conveniently thrown them over his shoulders to be able to keep moving faster.
Andy reaching the belay atop pitch 9 or 10 of Resolution Arete, Red Rocks, having cleaned many slings along the way and conveniently thrown them over his shoulders to be able to keep moving faster.

Conclusion


Climbing slings are an essential part of every climber's rack, and come in a surprising amount of different choices considering how simple a piece of gear they are. While any sling that you choose to buy will perform the job well, we feel there is no reason not to select the very highest performing ones if you have the chance. In general, Dyneema slings offer the best combination of performance and weight, but cost more. Nylon slings are a good alternative if you need to save some cash. Cord slings are great for specialty purposes, and having one or two on your rack can really help, but you wouldn't want an entire set of them. We hope that we have helped make your sling purchase easier and lead you towards the best product for you, and wish you happy climbing!

Related: Buying Advice for Climbing Slings

Stefan using the Metolius Open Loop sling to equalize the double bolt anchor at the start of the Naked Edge in Eldorado Canyon  CO.
Stefan using the Metolius Open Loop sling to equalize the double bolt anchor at the start of the Naked Edge in Eldorado Canyon, CO.


Andy Wellman