The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of outdoor gear

How We Tested Ski Jacket for Women

By Jessica Haist ⋅ Review Editor
Thursday May 16, 2019

Ski, Ski, Ski. That is how we tested these. We tested over multiple winters in the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the slopes of British Columbia, during all kinds of weather and snow conditions. We skied a lot of runs, sat on a lot of chairlifts, and even went for an overnight ski trip in the backcountry to put these through the paces.

We worked hard skiing deep powder and shredded perfect corduroy in the sun to test them in all weather conditions. We loaned these out to multiple women to test the fit, function, and features and got feedback for each one.

We tested the jacket's warmth and weather resistance while riding lots of chairlifts.
We tested the jacket's warmth and weather resistance while riding lots of chairlifts.

Weather Resistance


We systematically tested the water resistance of these models with spray tests, rolled around in the snow, and got thoroughly drenched in the rain while sitting on chairlifts. To evaluate wind resistance, we sat on the highest, windiest chairlifts and skied downhill as fast as we could. We went out to the ski hill on days we would normally stay in sipping hot chocolate lamenting about how nasty the weather was. We fiddled with every toggle on our hoods to see how effective they are and if they cover our helmets.

Comfort and Fit


We wore all the jackets and referenced our testers dimensions to that of the manufacturer's specs. This helped us gauge a baseline to let our readers know which jackets are on the small size and which are larger so you can decide if you need to size up or down. We also evaluated the comfort of the jacket by how soft the materials are and how well the jacket moves with us while skiing.

The Untracked has a relaxed fit that you can fit many layers on underneath.
The Untracked has a relaxed fit that you can fit many layers on underneath.

In addition, we frequented many happy hours and ran many errands around town to see how these jackets performed off the slopes. Life was rough, but someone had to do it.

We like the versatility of the two separate layers  and we think the inner jacket is pretty cute!
We like the versatility of the two separate layers, and we think the inner jacket is pretty cute!

Style


This one is pretty subjective, but we measured how many compliments we received and how many women wanted to wear each jacket versus how many tried it on, but didn't want to wear it. We also checked out all the colors available and evaluated them on the selection and how stylish those options are this season.

You'll fit right in at the resort in the Whirlibird III.
You'll fit right in at the resort in the Whirlibird III.

Warmth


We evaluated each jacket's fill weight and field effectiveness by sitting on cold chairlifts. We even played around with infrared cameras to check for drafty spots where heat may have been sneaking out, and to compare the effectiveness of different types of insulation. Our process involved leaving all of them outside to reach the same temperature prior to shooting, then we wore each one for one minute, then did 10 jumping jacks while wearing each one, and took a photo. This allowed us to note differences in insulation type and construction, and also to confirm our notes on the subjective warmth of each piece.

The Tiya kept us warm out on the slopes.
The Tiya kept us warm out on the slopes.

Ventilation


We worked hard in the deep pow to work up a sweat and then noted how clammy or dry inside we felt. We zipped and un-zipped our pits and noted how effective each one was.

This model has decent ventilation with mesh-lined pit-zips.
This model has decent ventilation with mesh-lined pit-zips.

Ski Features


We opened every pocket and pit-zip and snapped every powder skirt to test for functionality. We evaluated what was really necessary, and what is just a gimmick.

The Alpine Action's powder skirt.
The Alpine Action's powder skirt.