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The Best Trail Running Shoes of 2019

The Scarpa Spin Ultra are comfortable  highly protective shoes that are perfect for folks with wider feet  and are one of the best trail running shoes for running long distances in.
By Andy Wellman ⋅ Senior Review Editor
Thursday August 1, 2019
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Are you searching for the perfect pair of trail running shoes? We purchased the best 20 of 2019 after spending countless hours researching over 100 pairs available on the market today. We then put each pair through rigorous testing, running in all sorts of climates and environments, from desert single track to high alpine scrambles to mossy green forests, comparing each shoe against the others along the way. Whether you like maximum cushioning or zero drop, running short and fast or grinding out ultras, we have the perfect recommendations for you.

Related: The Best Women's Trail Running Shoes of 2019


Top 20 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 20
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Awards Editors' Choice Award  Best Buy Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award 
Price $179.95 at Backcountry$139.00 at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
$119.95 at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$128.07 at Amazon$150.00 at Amazon
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Pros Very protective midsole and upper, sock-like fit, grippy traction, lighter than previous versionPrecise fit, very grippy on rock, comfortable upper effectively keeps out debrisGreat traction on soft slippery surfaces, extremely comfortable, no increase in priceVery protective, stable, comfortable straight out of the box, good traction, wider fitThe most durable outsole, zero drop, amazing balance between foot protection and sensitivity, high volume fit
Cons Expensive, durability concernsNarrower than average, a bit pricey, not the lightestMidsole foam compresses out over time, easily collects rocks and debrisA bit heavy, expensive, not very sensitiveVery little interior padding, could be more comfortable, pricey
Bottom Line The shoe that best balances foot protection and sensitivity, all while providing an incredibly fine-tuned fit.A well-rounded shoe offering high performance for short or long distances.Our Best Bang for the Buck winner for great comfort and traction with a price lower than the other top scorers.A great choice for ultras or long distance training due to the excellent foot protection.The most unique and innovative trail running shoe we have seen hit the market in many years.
Rating Categories Salomon S/Lab Ultra 2 La Sportiva Kaptiva Saucony Peregrine ISO Scarpa Spin Ultra Inov-8 Terraultra G 260
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Specs Salomon S/Lab... La Sportiva Kaptiva Saucony Peregrine... Scarpa Spin Ultra Inov-8 Terraultra...
Weight (per pair, size 11) 22.7 oz. 22.3 oz. 23.1 oz. 23.9 oz. 22.2 oz.
Heel-to-Toe Drop 8 mm 6 mm 4 mm 6 mm 0 mm
Stack Height (Heel, Forefoot) 26 mm, 18 mm 17 mm, 11 mm 22.5 mm, 18.5mm Not disclosed 9 mm, 9 mm
Upper Mesh Sock-Like knit IsoFit Mesh, TPU Kevlar, mesh
Midsole Compressed EVA Duel-density EV PWRFOAM, Everun Compressed medium-density EVA with low density EVA inserts EXTERFLOW
Outsole Premium Wet Traction Contagrip FriXion XF 2.0 PWRTRAC Vibram MegaGrip Graphene Grip
Lacing style Kevlar Quicklace Traditional Traditional Traditional W/ lace garage Traditional
Wide version available? No No Yes No No
Sizes Available 4 - 13 38 - 47.5 8 - 14 40 - 48 EU 4-15

Best Overall Trail Running Shoe


Salomon S/Lab Ultra 2


Editors' Choice Award

$179.95
at Backcountry
See It

79
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Foot protection - 30% 10
  • Traction - 20% 7
  • Stability - 15% 8
  • Comfort - 15% 7
  • Weight - 10% 6
  • Sensitivity - 10% 6
Heel-to-Toe Drop: 8mm | Weight (per pair, size 11): 22.7 oz.
Extremely protective midsole and upper saves your feet from abuse
Locks foot in place for a very stable ride
Highly durable and grippy outsole
Slightly narrow (could be a pro for some!)
Not very much padding in upper
Very expensive

Most people may be unfamiliar with the name Francois D'haene, but if you follow the world ultra-running scene, you will know him as the man who is pretty much unbeatable at gnarly mountain 100-mile races. He not only has the course record at the largest and most iconic mountain 100 in the world, the UTMB in Chamonix but also countless long FKTs, such as the 210-mile-long John Muir Trail in California's Sierra Nevada. To say he knows a thing or two about running long distances would be an understatement. He put this knowledge to use developing the Salomon S/Lab Ultra 2, his signature shoe for a company that is well known for listening seriously to the advice of their sponsored athletes by creating innovative products that redefine mountain equipment. The S/Lab Ultra 2 uses a polyurethane injected upper mesh and Kevlar quick lace system, combined with a dense high-mileage EnergyCell EVA midsole to offer the most protective shoe of any that we have tested. For running on difficult, rocky terrain, or for going extra-long distances, foot protection is the single most valuable attribute that your trail running shoe has to offer, and the S/Lab Ultra 2 blows away the competition in this department. While this newly updated version remains fairly similar to the original, Salomon managed to shave off a few grams to lighten it slightly, and to our head tester, it feels slightly less narrow in the toe box.

The biggest downside to this shoe is the exorbitant price tag. While we truly believe that you are getting what you pay for — the best shoe for the most money, we readily admit that this is a lot of money to pay for a temporary piece of equipment. Those with wide feet may find the forefoot a bit too restrictive for their taste (check out our Editors' Choice winner for wide feet, the Scarpa Spin Ultra below!), and biomechanics nerds may not be thrilled about the 8mm heel-toe drop. Salomon calls this a "racing only" shoe, but we found it to be far more durable than their other racing only offerings, such as the Sense line of shoes (which are equally expensive!), and enjoyed wearing it repeatedly as a daily trainer. If long-distance trail running and racing is your jam, or you appreciate the most fine-tuned engineering regardless of price, we highly recommend you investigate the S/Lab Ultra 2.

Read review: Salomon S/Lab Ultra 2

Best Overall for Wider Feet


Scarpa Spin Ultra


Editors' Choice Award

$128.07
(14% off)
at Amazon
See It

73
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Foot protection - 30% 9
  • Traction - 20% 7
  • Stability - 15% 7
  • Comfort - 15% 9
  • Weight - 10% 4
  • Sensitivity - 10% 4
Heel-to-Toe Drop: 6mm | Weight (per pair, size 11): 23.9 oz.
Excellent underfoot protection
Stable landing and take-off platform
Super comfortable upper with cushioning
Expensive
Not very sensitive
A bit heavy

In 2019, Scarpa continues to build out their new line of trail running shoes centered around the design of the Scarpa Spin, introduced last year. The Spin Ultra is understandably the burliest of these new shoes, and while it may seem to be fairly no-frills, we found that it performs exactly how you would dream a long-distance or everyday trainer would. With a wider fit in the forefoot and toe box than the Salomon S/Lab Ultra 2, we think it makes for the best choice for runners who need a wider fit, something Scarpa shoes have long been known for. This shoe is very stable and protective, with a firm, nearly unbendable midsole that absorbs blows to the bottom of the foot like a boss, and remains flat for push-off, no matter what you happen to be standing on. In contrast to the S/Lab Ultra 2, it features a lot of cushioned padding in the upper, especially around the ankle opening, which makes it extremely comfortable, requiring no break-in time right out of the box. We also appreciate the grippiness and durability of its Vibram Megagrip outsole, which seems to be the most consistently awesome rubber compound used on the bottoms of trail running shoes these days.

As with any shoe, there are pros, but also cons. We feel people with very narrow feet may find themselves swimming in this shoe a bit, and so recommend checking out more traditionally narrow brands like Salomon or La Sportiva instead. This shoe is expensive, a sad and unfortunate trend that we saw in many trail running shoes this year, which hopefully won't be a harbinger of things to come. And as one would expect, with lots of underfoot protection, this shoe isn't super sensitive and weighs a few ounces more than the lightest shoes that we tested. For those who value foot protection and comfort, and are also appreciative of durability and being able to wear one shoe for a long distance, the Spin Ultra is one of the best choices you can make, and we highly recommend checking it out.

Read review: Scarpa Spin Ultra

Best Bang for the Buck


Saucony Peregrine ISO


Best Buy Award

$119.95
at Amazon
See It

75
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Foot protection - 30% 5
  • Traction - 20% 9
  • Stability - 15% 9
  • Comfort - 15% 10
  • Weight - 10% 5
  • Sensitivity - 10% 8
Heel-to-Toe Drop: 4 mm | Weight (per pair, size 11): 23.1 oz.
Extremely comfortable
Sticky and aggressive traction
Sensitive and stable
Little in the way of underfoot protection
Still a bit heavy

The Saucony Peregrine ISO is the ninth iteration of this popular and much-loved trail running shoe and sees some major revisions to the upper that make it simply one of the most comfortable shoes we have ever worn. Immediately noticeable is the borderline extreme amounts of cushioned padding that surround the ankle opening and tongue, but these pads also hold the foot as if it was wearing a shoe made of pillows. The inside of the upper, and the entire heel cup is nearly entirely seamless, and issues with blisters and rubbing seams from a couple of versions ago have been eliminated. The outsole remains the same as previous versions, one of the most aggressively lugged, and also sticky, that you can find on a trail shoe, giving excellent grip in snow, steep dirt, and grass. And while this shoe still retains its original price point, that amount is starting to seem like a bit of a bargain when considering how steeply the prices of trail running shoes are rising this year. With excellent performance and without a corresponding leap in price, we think this is a great choice for our Best Bang for the Buck Award.

The downsides to this shoe remain much the same as they have in the recent past. The midsole foam is not very thick, and is of the squishy, less-dense variety, ensuring that this shoe is very moldable to whatever you step on, but also doesn't absorb much impact before it is felt in the foot. Sensitivity buffs will find this to be a positive, but we find it harder to run over rough rocks in this shoe than many others with thicker, denser foam underfoot. This thin foam also seems to pack out relatively quickly, meaning you are less likely to log super high mileages in this shoe before feeling like you are ready for another pair. Despite these downsides, we feel that will all clothing, and especially footwear, comfort is king. The Peregrine ISO is more comfortable than any other and still comes at a price we would expect for a trail running shoe.

Read review: Saucony Peregrine ISO

Top Pick for the Best Traction


Salomon Speedcross 5


Top Pick Award

$129.95
at Backcountry
See It

72
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Foot protection - 30% 7
  • Traction - 20% 10
  • Stability - 15% 5
  • Comfort - 15% 8
  • Weight - 10% 4
  • Sensitivity - 10% 7
Heel-to-Toe Drop: 10mm | Weight (per pair, size 11): 24.4 oz.
Insanely sticky rubber with huge aggressive lugs
Considerably wider toe box than previous versions
Fits like a glove
Not super breathable and a bit hot
High heel-toe drop isn't the most stable design
Heavy

The Salomon Speedcross 5 has long been known for its insanely aggressive outsole, a design feature that has forced and inspired almost every competing shoe brand to imitate it. With its newest update to the Speedcross 5, Salomon has improved this already popular shoe by making the rubber on the sole even stickier than it was before so that it acts like glue to rock and even wet rock. Even more significantly, they widened the forefoot of this notoriously narrow shoe by a significant margin, drastically increasing both the comfort and wearability for those of us without narrow feet, while at the same time adding to the stability by offering a larger landing platform. These changes, in addition to making the arrow-shaped lugs larger and farther apart for easier mud shedding, and increasing the durability of the already beefy upper, make this the best version of the Speedcross in at least the last six years. The shoe still fits like a glove, locking the foot securely in place with Salomon's quick lace system, and feels supremely comfortable right out of the box. We have been running in these shoes for over eight years now, but have seen our love for them diminish as they got narrower and tighter as time went on. Well, this newest version has won us back over.

While we feel like this is a shoe that we once again love to run in, it still retains some of the longtime features that seem a bit outdated. Our biggest gripe is the 10mm heel-toe drop, combined with the very thick and high off the ground heel counter that we not only find to be unstable, especially when running downhill but a bit of a relic of a bygone era in shoe design. It's also pretty heavy on the spectrum of trail shoes these days, especially as most pairs continue to get lighter and lighter, and it retains its reputation for running a bit warm and lacking breathability. This just means that these shoes are better used for higher altitude mountain runs where the air is cool, which is what they are designed for anyway. While we are psyched that Inov-8 expanded the selection of Graphene infused rubber soles to another favorite of ours, the Inov-8 Roclite 290, our side-by-side testing showed that the Speedcross simply gripped better. If you enjoy running off-trail or in the mountains, where the ground is often wet, snowy, muddy, rocky, and steep, the Speedcross 5 is an ideal choice, offering traction unrivaled by any other shoe.

Read review: Salomon Speedcross 5

Top Pick for Zero Drop


Inov-8 Terraultra G 260


Top Pick Award

$150.00
at Amazon
See It

73
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Foot protection - 30% 7
  • Traction - 20% 8
  • Stability - 15% 9
  • Comfort - 15% 6
  • Weight - 10% 6
  • Sensitivity - 10% 7
Heel-to-Toe Drop: 0 mm | Weight (per pair, size 11): 22.2 oz.
The graphene-enhanced outsole rubber is the most durable you can find
Sticky grip on all types of surfaces
Zero drop yet protective enough for long distance runs
Protective, stable, and sensitive
High volume fit perfect for runners with wide or large feet
Not the most comfortable, lacks interior padding
Pricey

Zero-drop diehards have long been accustomed to buying shoes from one specific company — Altra — and indeed we have recommended countless pairs of these for those aficionados over the years. This year we jump ship, going in a different direction to recommend the Inov-8 TerraUltra G260 as our Top Pick for Zero Drop. While we acknowledge that the Altra Superior 4 is significantly improved from the last three or four versions which all suffered from major flaws, we point toward the TerraUltra G260 instead because they're incredibly burly and will last you far longer than your compressible foam Altras. Not only is this shoe zero-drop, but it's designed to last you as long as possible, made with Inov-8's new graphene-enhanced G-grip rubber outsole and Kevlar upper. G-grip, released at the end of 2018 is a revolutionary rubber outsole made with Graphene, a single-atom-thick layer of Graphite which is not only the single strongest material ever tested in a lab, but is so fresh and revolutionary that its discovery won a Nobel Prize in Physics as recently as 2010. How this material, proven to be ten times stronger than steel, combines with rubber to make up the lugged outsole of this shoe is a secret that Inov-8 will not soon be disclosing, but which provides durability far greater than any outsole we have tested in years. We took it on numerous runs over sharp pumice lava fields that lasted for miles on the PCT in Oregon, and while we commonly saw little colored pieces of torn off shoe rubber littering the trail as we ran by, our shoes looked pretty much unscarred by the experience.

As one would expect, this shoe feels significantly different from your average pair of Altra Lone Peak 4. They are relatively firm underfoot, without the squishy foam bounce you may expect. That said, their firm cushioning doesn't squash down and flatten out after only a couple hundred miles. They are also pricey, but once again, you are getting so much more life from your shoe for the increase in price, so in our mind, the trade-off is certainly worth it. If you love the ergonomics of a zero-drop platform and an even balance between underfoot protection and sensitivity, then we encourage you to check out the highly durable and innovative TerraUltra G260.

Read review: Inov-8 TerraUltra G 260

Top Pick for Maximum Cushioning


HOKA ONE ONE Challenger ATR 5


Top Pick Award

$129.95
at Backcountry
See It

66
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Foot protection - 30% 9
  • Traction - 20% 7
  • Stability - 15% 4
  • Comfort - 15% 6
  • Weight - 10% 7
  • Sensitivity - 10% 3
Heel-to-Toe Drop: 5 mm | Weight (per pair, size 11): 21.5 oz.
Massively improved traction is sticky and durable
Firmer foam underfoot means better stability
Now comes in size EE wide
Absorbs very little water
Fit in heel is a bit wide
Gained some weight compared to previous versions

Maximally cushioned shoes have an inordinate amount of foam padding underneath the foot which helps to dampen the effects of the repetitive impacts of running, especially over long distances, while also protecting the sole of the foot from objects that may be encountered along the way. No longer a quirky novelty, pretty much every runner at this point has heard about Hokas, tried them out, and formed an opinion on whether they help one stay healthy on the trail or are likely to be the cause of the next injury. This year, Hoka updated their popular Hoka ONE ONE Challenger ATR 5, keeping the simple, water-shedding upper and the dampened, stiffer EVA foam underfoot, while finally adding a sticky rubber outsole with lugs that grip both rock and dirt, and won't tear off in a heartbeat. They also expanded the sizing offerings to include EE wide, which is an awesome accommodation considering these shoes tend to fit narrow in the forefoot to begin with. These additions induced us to recognize them as our Top Pick for Maximum Cushioning.

Of course, Hokas have always had a few drawbacks that scare people away (besides just their looks) — most notably their lack of stability on uneven terrain. These shoes exhibit that hindrance less than past versions we have tested, mostly due to employing a firmer, denser feeling foam that doesn't rock as much from side to side or bounce back with a springy action while you run. While this does change the trail feel a bit compared to older Hokas, or the Hoka Speedgoat 3, we think it improves stability and overall performance. For our head tester, the fit still remains a little wide in the heel and narrow in the forefoot, but everyone has different shaped feet, and this shouldn't dissuade you from trying them out. These shoes are light, relatively affordable compared to other Hokas, and have become exceedingly refined, making them the ideal choice for Hoka lovers and those who are curious to test the benefits for themselves.

Read review: Hoka Challenger ATR 5

Top Pick for Hiking


Altra Lone Peak 4.0


Top Pick Award

$119.95
at Backcountry
See It

66
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Foot protection - 30% 6
  • Traction - 20% 6
  • Stability - 15% 8
  • Comfort - 15% 8
  • Weight - 10% 5
  • Sensitivity - 10% 7
Heel-to-Toe Drop: 0 mm | Weight (per pair, size 11): 23.9 oz.
Drastically improved from the last version
Zero drop platform is wide, stable, and responsive
Drains water well
Loose, comfortable fit
On the heavy side, and heavier than previous versions
While comfortable, fit is also a bit sloppy

The Altra Lone Peak 4 is one of the most popular trail running shoes in North America, in large part because of its zero drop platform combined with enough underfoot protection to enable long-distance adventures without trashing one's feet. But runners are not the only ones who love this shoe — hikers, and particularly thru-hikers — have also adopted it as a must-have piece of gear for long-haul adventures. While hiking boots and even hiking shoes have long been the most commonly recommended footwear for most trail users, many of us have realized that trail running shoes are also an ideal choice for simple hiking and even backpacking. Just because you intend to spend the day walking instead of running doesn't mean that you don't want the lightest, nimblest, and highest performing footwear, which without doubt are trail running shoes. The Lone Peak 4s are particularly good for hiking because of their zero-drop platform, meaning your heel is the same height above the ground as your toes. This is the way human bodies were designed to walk, and is an important structural consideration, especially if you intend to walk, say, the entire Appalachian Trail in one go. They also fit fairly loose but stay responsive, are quite comfortable, and drain water well.

On the downside, trail running shoes will not last as long as a pair of hiking boots before needing to be replaced, so long-distance hikers may need to budget for a few pairs on one adventure. Altras, in particular, are not known for their exemplary durability, although our test pair withstood all we put them through just fine. Backpackers and thru-hikers with well-adapted musculature and light packs will greatly appreciate the increased efficiency of walking in light, responsive footwear as opposed to stomping out long miles in clunkier boots or heavier shoes. When it comes to choosing the best trail runner for hiking and backpacking, we agree with the thru-hikers and have thus awarded the Lone Peak 4 as our Top Pick for Hiking.

Read review: Altra Lone Peak 4


Why You Should Trust Us


This review was led by Andy Wellman, a senior reviewer at OutdoorGearLab who has been testing running shoes since 2014. Andy has been running his entire life, ever since he was the fastest (and smallest) kid on his youth soccer team. While running through the mountains for simple fitness and due to impatience on long mountain approaches and descents has always been his norm, in 2011 he was bit by the competitive running bug. He took to it in earnest, and along the way managed to win or podium at mountain races from 10k to half marathon, as well as marathon, 50k, 50 mile, and the Mustang Trail Race, a nine-day stage race through the Himalayas. In 2014 he quit his job to live a nomadic, dirtbag lifestyle of mountain running, traveling the world and the American West to explore wild trails. Those adventures led him to settle in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado, a modern-day mountain running mecca and home to the iconic Hardrock Hundred trail race, where he began reviewing trail running shoes and other running apparel for OutdoorGearLab. He now bases himself out of another running hotspot — Bend, Oregon — where the air is a little thicker and the trails a bit faster, but with access to just as many epic adventures.

The Roclite 290 are not one of the most protective shoes  and instead offer great trail feel and sensitivity. They are perhaps better for shorter distance efforts for this reason. Here testing them on great single track next to the Deschutes River in Oregon.
The softer Contagrip TA rubber compound grips extremely well to rock  making this a great shoe for scrambling in the course of the run.
Despite the decent amount of foam underfoot  we found these shoes to be quite stable while out running on the trail  a solid trait for picking through uneven terrain like roots and rocks.

Testing of trail running shoes never really ends, as companies now release new models all throughout the calendar year. These shoes are tested in all seasons, on road trips all over the country, and are continuously compared against the other newest shoes available, as well as against previous versions of the same shoe (you should see all the shoes in Andy's closet!). As a bit of a Luddite, he doesn't wear a watch or log his miles and time spent running, but has run in and tested over 130 different pairs of trail running shoes over the past six years, so feels he has a pretty informed idea about what works and what doesn't out on the trail. That said, since it can sometimes be hard to find people with the same size foot to help him test shoes (it does happen), he also chats with pretty much every runner he meets to get their opinions of the shoes on their feet. You can rest assured that what you read in this review is knowledge hard-won through time actually spent out on the trail.

Analysis and Test Results


Trail running shoes differ drastically from their road running counterparts by offering more protection for your feet, both in the midsole and in the upper, while also having far more aggressive traction that can handle difficult and rugged terrain. While many of the companies that make trail running shoes are also famous for their road running shoe selections, there are also a few players in this market that focus only on the trail and off-road side of things. If you are new to trail running, we highly recommend purchasing a pair of trail running shoes, rather than go it in your normal road running shoes. The advantages are considerable and are more than worth it when considering slips and injuries in wild and remote terrain, or even on an urban trail, are both more likely and also harder to manage than on the side of a road or bike path. Choosing the right equipment for the job virtually always leads to better results, and having more fun, and trail running is no exception.

The trails at Smith Rock State Park in central Oregon are a fantastic winter training ground because they are almost always dry while the surrounding mountains are buried in snow. Here cruising a ridgeline trail in the Challenger ATR 5 in January.
The trails at Smith Rock State Park in central Oregon are a fantastic winter training ground because they are almost always dry while the surrounding mountains are buried in snow. Here cruising a ridgeline trail in the Challenger ATR 5 in January.

Testing new pairs of shoes and updating this review is a year-round process. We add in intriguing new shoes and the latest updates as they become available and we have a chance to fully test them. There are currently 20 of the most popular and best trail running shoe available covered in this review, with new pairs being constantly added in as we have a chance to fully vet them. Our testing involves lots of running on trails and even off-trail adventures in every pair of shoes you see here, as well as a whole host of different controlled tests to see which shoes perform well, or not, at specific tasks like side-hilling (a stability test), absorbing blows to the bottom of the feet (running over jagged rocks, a test of foot protection and sensitivity), and the water test (one of many factors that help us assess for comfort).

When testing an updated version of a shoe, we have on hand all of the older models that we have tested, so we can closely compare both the feel on our feet and the trail, as well as cosmetic changes that have taken place. In all cases, our testing and assessments are done in comparison to the other shoes described here. If one shoe receives a poor score, that doesn't mean it is a poor shoe, but simply that it doesn't perform as well as the other excellent shoes we compared it to. Since we aim to test only the best and most innovative trail running shoes, we think all of these shoes are pretty solid. We strive to keep this review as up to date as possible, and our expert testers have finished putting in the miles on a whole new crop of shoes, so read on to find out which new versions and fresh releases are the best.

We enjoyed these shoes most on smooth dirt trails  like this one  in scenic places of course! The deep Crooked River Gorge and river are far below the Otter Bench Trail in Oregon.
We enjoyed these shoes most on smooth dirt trails, like this one, in scenic places of course! The deep Crooked River Gorge and river are far below the Otter Bench Trail in Oregon.

Below you will find descriptions of the six metrics that we test and assess for to come up with a shoe's overall score: foot protection, traction, stability, comfort, weight, and sensitivity. A score of 1-10 is awarded for each metric, and then the metrics are weighted as a percentage of the final score based upon their relative importance to the overall performance of a shoe. Worth noting is that the highest overall scorers may not be the best shoes for you. Carefully decide which metrics matter most to you and your intended goals, desires, and adventures to find out whether a particular shoe perfectly matches your needs.

Value


A significant critical consideration when selecting a pair of trail running shoes is the value of the purchase. While one could simply assume that you get what you pay for, and thus more expensive products are also the highest performing, years of testing has proven to us that this isn't always the case.

The Terraultra G 260 is a revolutionary shoe meant for long distance trail running. They are highly durable  have great traction  and are also zero drop  a combination that many trail runners should love. Testing them here on the trails of the Sisters Wilderness in Oregon.
The Terraultra G 260 is a revolutionary shoe meant for long distance trail running. They are highly durable, have great traction, and are also zero drop, a combination that many trail runners should love. Testing them here on the trails of the Sisters Wilderness in Oregon.

When considering the value of a trail running shoe, three aspects are critical to consider: price, performance, and longevity. Two of these, price and performance, are easily quantifiable and can be compared effectively.


The third aspect of value for a trail running shoe is longevity, something that is not at all easy to quantify. Since all pairs of shoes wear out in a finite period and need to be replaced, finding shoes that can withstand more miles of abuse before disintegrating is also critical to ascertaining that shoe's value. Unfortunately, not only does every runner put a different amount of strain on their shoes, but we didn't have the time or energy to completely trash 20 pairs of shoes before publishing our findings! That said, after many years of testing literally hundreds of pairs of shoes, we have noticed some areas of shoes that tend to be the first points of failure, as well as certain design features that tend to wear out quicker than desired.

The Wildhorse 5 are an ideal shoe for running long distances  for logging tons of training miles  or for running ultra races. They perform best on dry trails  such as this one above Wychus Creek in central Oregon.
The Wildhorse 5 are an ideal shoe for running long distances, for logging tons of training miles, or for running ultra races. They perform best on dry trails, such as this one above Wychus Creek in central Oregon.

Foot Protection


In our opinion, the most important criteria for evaluating a trail running shoe is how well it protects your foot. After all, if it doesn't offer your foot protection, why would you be wearing it? The largest component of protection is what is found underfoot — in short, the combination of the outsole and midsole. The soles of the feet are among the most sensitive areas of your body, so if you intend to run on rocky and uneven terrain, which is what we do when we trail run, then your shoe will need adequate underfoot protection. Forego this protection, and watch how your feet will dictate to you whether you can run on a trail or not, and how fast you can go.


Most underfoot protection comes in one of two forms: a rock plate made of a hard plastic or composite material that adds rigidity to the shoe and absorbs impacts, or in lieu of that, thick foam cushioning. The most common type of foam found in contenders is EVA foam, which not only protects the foot from protrusions but also absorbs a significant amount of the impact inherent to running before it travels upward into a runner's body. The third method of underfoot protection, found on the Nike shoes in this review, is trapped air pockets in the heel that also offer both protection and cushioning. An interesting component of foot protection is that it often comes at the expense of sensitivity, and vice versa, which is why we grade for both.

Bombing down hills is one of the great pleasures of trail running and is certainly made easier by the copious amounts of plush EVA foam underfoot in the Challenger ATR 5  one of the most protective shoes underfoot you can buy.
Bombing down hills is one of the great pleasures of trail running and is certainly made easier by the copious amounts of plush EVA foam underfoot in the Challenger ATR 5, one of the most protective shoes underfoot you can buy.

A lesser component of foot protection is how well the upper does in protecting the top and sides of your foot from protrusions like sticks or abrasion by rocks. The ends of the toes are a common point of abuse, as we have all accidentally kicked a rock while bombing down the trail. Rigid toe bumpers go a long way in helping to alleviate this pain, as does choosing a shoe that is not too tight on the toes. Many manufacturers skimp on upper materials to save weight and offer greater breathability and water drainage, while some have uppers that are as mighty as a Kevlar bulletproof vest.

Running across any sort of rough  rocky terrain makes one appreciate the protection their shoe is providing for their foot  but crossing lava fields  like here in the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness of Oregon  makes foot protection essential. This shoe is among the most protective that you can buy.
Running across any sort of rough, rocky terrain makes one appreciate the protection their shoe is providing for their foot, but crossing lava fields, like here in the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness of Oregon, makes foot protection essential. This shoe is among the most protective that you can buy.

There are a handful of shoes that offer foot protection that is better than the rest. Our Editors' Choice award-winning Salomon S/Lab Ultra 2 does a great job of protecting the undersides of our feet with its dual-density EVA foam, while also providing far more upper protection than any other shoe we tested. The combination left us smiling, and ensured we could run down a trail as out of control as we wanted, knowing that our shoes had our back. Offering a considerable amount of underfoot protection, but without a hugely protective upper, are both of the maximally cushioned Hokas that we tested — the Speedgoat 3 as well as the Hoka Challenger ATR 5. These shoes have tons of absorptive foam cushioning that not only absorbs impact from rocks, but also from the ground in general. The Scarpa Spin Ultra and Nike Wildhorse 5 are also toe shoes that offer an exemplary amount of foot protection. Since we think this is such a vital component to running your best anywhere off-road, we weighted foot protection as 30% of a shoe's final score.

Hokas have the most underfoot EVA foam of any shoe  although this foam is relatively soft and not as firm as many other shoes. Regardless  it does a good job of protecting the bottoms of your feet when out on rocky terrain.
Hokas have the most underfoot EVA foam of any shoe, although this foam is relatively soft and not as firm as many other shoes. Regardless, it does a good job of protecting the bottoms of your feet when out on rocky terrain.

Traction


If it wasn't for the drastically increased performance when it comes to traction, there would be only a minimal amount of incentive to purchase trail running shoes instead of simple road running shoes. Based on this assessment, one could certainly make the argument that traction is the single most important aspect of a trail running shoe, and is certainly one of the very first things you should check out when trying on a new pair of trail shoes.


To come up with these scores, we devised several controlled tests where we tested each pair of shoes one at a time and rated them based on how well they did on that surface. The different surfaces were steep dirt, steep grass, mud, snow, dry rock, and wet rock. So the scores above are an amalgamation of a shoe's performance on all of these separate surfaces, and the higher the score, the more surfaces that the shoe would be capable of sticking easily to with a high level of confidence that it wouldn't slip.

After about two months of exclusive use  the tread on the TerraUltra G260 is pretty much unmarred. The graphene-infused rubber really does seem to drastically increase the longevity of this shoe's outsole  a boon for trail runners.
After about two months of exclusive use, the tread on the TerraUltra G260 is pretty much unmarred. The graphene-infused rubber really does seem to drastically increase the longevity of this shoe's outsole, a boon for trail runners.

Two main factors contribute to a shoe's ability to grip a variety of surfaces well: the type and spacing of lugs, and the performance of the rubber used. In general, deeper, more aggressive lugs will grip most surfaces better, especially steep dirt, grass, mud, and snow. More and more trail running shoes are reflecting this with the aggressiveness of lugs growing across the board in recent years. Lugs that are spaced closely together tend to do a better job of gripping well on rock and hard dirt surfaces, while lugs that are further apart tend to do the best job of shedding mud without allowing it to build up into a huge, heavy pancake on the bottom of the shoe.

The hardness of rubber also plays a large part in the traction performance of a shoe. Softer rubber tends to be stickier and does a far better job gripping rock, both wet and dry. The downside of soft rubber is that it wears out or in some cases rips off much easier, often shortening the life of the shoe if you wear them too much on pavement or hard surfaces. In contrast, firmer rubber tends to be more durable and last a lot longer but doesn't bite into rock nearly as well. Firm rubber is preferable for shoes that will mostly be used on firm surfaces, like hardpacked dirt trails.

The outsole of the Inov-8 Roclite 290 is made with the new graphene enhanced G-grip rubber that we have found to be very durable when running over hard abrasive surfaces like rock. The plethora of 6mm deep cleats found on the bottom also provide excellent traction on soft surfaces like dirt  mud  grass  and snow.
The outsole of the Inov-8 Roclite 290 is made with the new graphene enhanced G-grip rubber that we have found to be very durable when running over hard abrasive surfaces like rock. The plethora of 6mm deep cleats found on the bottom also provide excellent traction on soft surfaces like dirt, mud, grass, and snow.

While all of the shoes we test offer pretty solid traction, especially on your standard dirt trail, a few are particularly noteworthy for their excellent grip. The Salomon Speedcross 5, newly updated in the winter of 2019, has gigantic protruding rubber lugs spaced far apart for the absolute best grip on mud, grass, and snow. With a change in rubber compounds, it is also now softer and by far the stickiest of any we tested on rock and wet rock as well, although has the propensity to wear down quicker if used too often on hard surfaces. The graphene infused G-grip rubber found on the bottoms of the Inov-8 Roclite 290 and the TerraUltra G260 is not quite as sticky on rock as the Speedcross, but is far more durable. In fact, with the addition of graphene, the strongest textile substance ever lab tested by man, these shoes have the most durable outsoles of any we tested, adding significantly to their long term value. Lastly, the outsole of the Saucony Peregrine ISO looks like something you might use to tenderize aged meat. In this case, you can use it to tenderize the soft, slippery trail beneath your feet. As one of the most important aspects of a trail running shoe's repertoire, we weighted traction as 20% of a product's final score.

The summit of Coxcomb Peak is well-known as one of the hardest 13ers in Colorado to access  with mandatory chossy 5.6 scrambling. Here is the author  about to reverse the crux section along the summit ridge  racing the impending lightning storm  while wearing the Inov-8 Roclite 290. Photo by Stephen Eginoire.
The summit of Coxcomb Peak is well-known as one of the hardest 13ers in Colorado to access, with mandatory chossy 5.6 scrambling. Here is the author, about to reverse the crux section along the summit ridge, racing the impending lightning storm, while wearing the Inov-8 Roclite 290. Photo by Stephen Eginoire.

Stability


Trail running takes place over uneven ground, and being able to land and push off from a stable platform is a critical feature of how well a shoe performs. Failure to maintain stability through the running stride will lead to either losing traction and slipping, or even worse, rolling an ankle, often leading to injury.


Through our extensive testing over many years, we have found that stability is largely impacted by the following four factors: stack height, heel-toe drop, landing platform, and fit of the upper. The stack height represents how much material rests between the ground and your foot, and is measured in millimeters. In most cases, the larger the stack height, the greater the chance for a rolled ankle, although this threat can be mitigated by having a wider landing platform. The landing platform is the shape of the bottom of the shoe. Wider typically ensures greater stability, while a narrower platform is less stable. Heel-toe drop measures the difference in stack height between the heel and the toes, once again measured in millimeters.

Over the last many years shoe companies, largely in response to customer demand, have been slowly lowering the average heel-toe drop, which today rests around 4-6 mm. Shoes with a substantial drop are considerably less stable on uneven terrain, especially going downhill. Shoes with 0mm of drop, known as zero-drop, are usually the most stable. Finally, a shoe with an upper that holds your foot firmly in place allows you to land squarely on top of the footbed, minimizing foot movement within the shoe. The opposite of this are sloppy shoes that don't hold the foot in place through the stride, which are inherently less stable.

Another key factor when considering foot stability is the firmness of the midsole under your foot. Very stiff shoes tend to be more stable than very soft and pliable ones. A flexible shoe that can easily bend in any direction is more sensitive and allows your foot to take the shape of what it lands upon, but this is not generally the most stable design. When walking, your foot is used to pushing off of a flat, even surface, and so a shoe that provides this for you, even if you are stepping on a very uneven surface like rocks, feels more stable. Of course, stiffness leads to a clunkier feel, which isn't nearly as sensitive and tends to be a bit heavier, so there are trade-offs, and personal preference plays a roll in what will feel better for you.

With a wide forefoot  a low stack height  and a zero-drop platform  the Superior 4 are quite stable  with a very low propensity to cause an ankle to roll. They are soft and mold to the terrain they land on  like this grassy side-hill.
With a wide forefoot, a low stack height, and a zero-drop platform, the Superior 4 are quite stable, with a very low propensity to cause an ankle to roll. They are soft and mold to the terrain they land on, like this grassy side-hill.

Most of our testing for stability is done while out on trail or adventure runs, but we also compare shoes in a more controlled setting by running in each of them one after the other both across a steep hillside and straight down a similarly steep slope. The Altra Superior 4, a very light and low-riding zero-drop shoe, is one of the most stable that we tested. The combination of a completely flat footbed without any heel rise and a super wide platform that allows one's feet to splay out fully when landing ensures that stability is never compromised with this shoe. Despite having a 4mm heel-toe drop, the Nike Terra Kiger 5 feels equally as stable when running on varied terrain. This is due once again to the wide toe box and forefoot area of the shoe and the very low to the ground ride. The Inov-8 TerraUltra G260, Scarpa Spin, and our Editors' Choice for Wide Feet, the Scarpa Spin Ultra, scored similarly well in our head-to-head stability testing. As a critical component of a trail running shoe's performance, but not the most important, we assigned stability 15% of a shoe's final score.

Running on this trail that has been recently demolished by horses and cattle  or both  requires attention and a very stable shoe. The Peregrine performs well at this sort of terrain due to its low to the ground  4mm heel-toe drop.
Running on this trail that has been recently demolished by horses and cattle, or both, requires attention and a very stable shoe. The Peregrine performs well at this sort of terrain due to its low to the ground, 4mm heel-toe drop.

Comfort


Comfort is probably the single most important criteria when it comes to selecting a running shoe, or any footwear at all for that matter, and is what we recommend you value above all other factors when selecting a pair of shoes for you. However, it is also the criteria most difficult to rate - because it is so subjective. Everyone's foot is different, so what feels amazing to one person could be un-wearable by another. Some products are wide in the toe box while narrow in the heel, and some are just really narrow (or wide) throughout. Some fit perfectly "to size," while others run slightly long or short. Since the comfort level of each shoe will be different for each person, we chose only to rate it 15% of a product's final score. We don't want to penalize a shoe that feels uncomfortable to our head tester too much when many other people will naturally end up loving it. However, we have found some universal factors that could be compared and rated.


Craftsmanship seems to play a large role in how comfortable a given model is. The most comfortable pairs use a seamless construction that makes them easy to wear sockless (although we don't commonly do so, except for comparison testing). Poorly sewn seams or out of place material overlaps inside a shoe tend to rub and wear against the foot over long distances, significantly decreasing their overall comfort. Likewise, shoes that don't do a good job of naturally holding the foot in place mean that we need to crank down the laces to provide a secure fit, often leading to discomfort along the top of our feet or front of the ankle joint over long distances. Some shoes don't breathe very well and leave our feet excessively hot and sweaty, while others are a bit too short for the size, meaning our toes will hit the front of the shoe, especially while running downhill. Most of our findings for the Comfort metric are based on our anecdotal evidence from long runs on a variety of terrain. We also conducted the water drainage test to get a better grip on which shoes absorb the least amount of water or sweat; the test also measures which contenders are the most efficient at drying out afterward, which we define as another essential component of comfort.

Running on the trail that circumnavigates the Mountain Lake on Orcas Island  Washington  on a very warm spring day  while wearing the La Sportiva Kaptiva  a very comfortable and form-fitting shoe.
Running on the trail that circumnavigates the Mountain Lake on Orcas Island, Washington, on a very warm spring day, while wearing the La Sportiva Kaptiva, a very comfortable and form-fitting shoe.

With an incredible amount of cushioned padding surround the foot and a high-quality, seamless upper that allows for sockless wearing, the Saucony Peregrine ISO is currently the most comfortable trail running shoes. Also featuring very comfortable and plush padding that make the foot feel more like they are ensconced in slippers than shoes are the Scarpa Spin Ultra and The North Face Ampezzo. In years past we have lauded the comfort of the two trail running shoes made by Nike, but after recent testing, we feel that the recent releases of the Wildhorse 5 and Terra Kiger 5 are not quite as comfortable as their predecessors, at least to our head tester. Most of the other pairs of shoes tested are also very comfortable, and to some degree, it is impossible to eliminate user bias when grading for this metric. With that in mind, we still strongly recommend you try shoes on before committing to a purchase. If you decide to order online, do so from a company that will allow you to return them if they don't fit as well as you had hoped.

Running through some really incredible and large burned out trees in the Pole Creek Drainage of the Sisters Wilderness  OR  in the rain  while wearing the Scarpa Spin Ultra.
Running through some really incredible and large burned out trees in the Pole Creek Drainage of the Sisters Wilderness, OR, in the rain, while wearing the Scarpa Spin Ultra.

The Water Drainage Test

Whether you live and run on the East Coast, in the Pacific Northwest, or the Rockies, it is a common phenomenon while trail running to end up with wet feet. Even if you don't typically encounter rain, snow, dew, or creek crossings on your runs, your shoes will likely be exposed to water in the form of sweat issuing from your feet. In an attempt to figure out which shoes absorb the least amount of water, and then manage to shed it the quickest once wet, we devised the water drainage test. Our results are for your benefit most of all, but we also integrated them into how we assessed scores for comfort.

How well a shoe handles water absorption is a critical component of comfort. Here wearing the Scarpa Spin Ultra as we wade through one of 14 river crossings that we did on one eight mile trail run in the Ochoco Mountains of Oregon. These shoes unfortunately absorbed more than most.
How well a shoe handles water absorption is a critical component of comfort. Here wearing the Scarpa Spin Ultra as we wade through one of 14 river crossings that we did on one eight mile trail run in the Ochoco Mountains of Oregon. These shoes unfortunately absorbed more than most.

To start, we weighed the pair of shoes clean and dry, then dunked them completely in a bucket of water for 20 seconds. This was immediately followed by a 20 second draining period, where we held them whichever way we could to drain excess water quickest. We then weighed the shoes to see how much water they absorbed and turned this amount into a percentage. We then put the wet shoes on while sockless, and ran around the block for five minutes, before weighing the shoes a final time to see what percentage of water they managed to shed in a short period.

The water bucket test begins by dunking each pair of shoes for exactly 20 seconds to give them a chance to absorb water. We then held them upside down above the bucket for another 20 seconds to let them drain before weighing them.
The water bucket test begins by dunking each pair of shoes for exactly 20 seconds to give them a chance to absorb water. We then held them upside down above the bucket for another 20 seconds to let them drain before weighing them.

The Salomon S/Lab Ultra 2 top the charts in both tests, absorbing the least amount of water, and still weighing the least after the five-minute run. Made largely of synthetic mesh and felt-like materials, these shoes are the best choice if you want a shoe for running in the pool or a similar environment. The Adidas Terrex Speed and the Merrell MTL Cirrus both also exhibited an impressive performance when it came to these tests, absorbing very little water compared to the competition. Also, despite their size, the Hoka Challenger ATR 5 were among the lightest compared to their dry weight after the five-minute jog, meaning they drain the water they take on very quickly. Shoes with lower percentages are better performers where water is concerned, and those with higher percentages tended to be more towel-like, sucking up the water they came in contact with.

Showing the results of our comparative water test  which tries to determine which shoes absorb the most and least amount of water (on the left)  and also which shoes dry out quickest once waterlogged (right). Lower scores mean less water held by the fabric of the shoe  and likely a better choice if you encounter water on a regular basis.
Showing the results of our comparative water test, which tries to determine which shoes absorb the most and least amount of water (on the left), and also which shoes dry out quickest once waterlogged (right). Lower scores mean less water held by the fabric of the shoe, and likely a better choice if you encounter water on a regular basis.

Weight


Here at OutdoorGearLab, weight is one of our favorite metrics for judging the benefits of a product or piece of gear. Not only is it extremely easy to quantify and measure, but literally thousands of hours testing every sort of gear imaginable, by hundreds of different people, has always confirmed the same assumption: Light is Right! Weight used to be one of those things you would only consider when buying a tent or stove for backpacking, but didn't think mattered enough to consider for precious outdoor items like clothing, backpacks, climbing ropes, sleeping pads, or running shoes.

However, we've come to realize that in virtually every situation, carrying less weight in clothing and equipment makes your sport or activity easier to perform, which in turn makes it more fun. Trail running is no exception, and while the weight of a simple pair of shoes may not seem noticeable to you on your daily run, trust us when we say that it is very noticeable to us as we test pair after pair after pair in quick succession. To have the most fun, you want the lightest pair of shoes that you can get away with while still meeting the basic needs of your body and objectives.

Getting in some leg turnover in the super lightweight Adidas Terrex Speed on the Grey Butte Trail in central Oregon  which is clearly more fun when constantly being chased by the crazy puppy Rishi.
Getting in some leg turnover in the super lightweight Adidas Terrex Speed on the Grey Butte Trail in central Oregon, which is clearly more fun when constantly being chased by the crazy puppy Rishi.

Of course, weight typically comes at the cost of something. Often this something is the rockplate or other mode of underfoot protection. Trimming materials from the upper is another common way of shaving off the grams. However, with the continual evolution of new material choices, shoe companies can do a lot more with less, and are doing so by using lighter weight mesh uppers strengthened with TPU overlays rather than plastic support, and EVA foam in place of hard rock plates in the midsole. It's true that the very lightest shoes reviewed here are certainly the least supportive, and are only fit for certain uses, such as short races or speedwork. However, whether your desires and objectives require a zero-drop shoe or a maximally cushioned beast, you will be happier if that shoe weighs less. To assess for weight, we took each pair of shoes out of the box and immediately weighed them on our independent scale before they had a chance to collect any dirt. All weights listed are for US men's size 11, but the weights should accurately represent their comparative position no matter what size you happen to wear.


Trail running shoes are more tightly grouped at the lower end of the weight scale than they used to be, while not being willing to cut out necessary features like protection to attain a low weight. However, at a mere 16 ounces per pair, the Hoka Evo Jawz blew many out of the water, weighing three ounces less than the next closest competitor. This shoe is reminiscent of a racing flat but designed with mountain running in mind. The second-lightest shoe is the newly redesigned Altra Superior 4, which managed to shed a couple of ounces over its previous version and drop the overall weight down to 18.8 ounces per pair. Numerous other shoes weighed in right around 20 ounces, but perhaps the most remarkable of these is the New Balance Fresh Foam Gobi v3 due to its low cost, as well as the fact that it provides more protection than its weight would suggest. As an essential thing to consider, but not the be-all-end-all in running shoe performance, we assigned weight 10% of a product's final score.

The scale doesn't lie! Eight ounces each is one super light shoe!
The scale doesn't lie! Eight ounces each is one super light shoe!

Sensitivity


We define sensitivity by how easy it is to feel the trail beneath your feet. While trail running shoes are designed to protect your feet from abrasion, direct blows from the pointy sides of rocks, or from repeated impacts inherent in the motion of running itself, they need to balance this protection with the fact that to run effectively, our brains demand feedback from our feet. The shoes that allow for greater feedback were awarded more points for sensitivity.


The soles of the feet are one of the most sensitive areas of our entire body, which makes intuitive sense if you consider how much it hurts to cut your foot, or how inordinately ticklish many people's feet are. Much like our hands, our feet evolved to be super sensitive because they are one of our primary sources of interaction with the world. In the ages before humans started wearing shoes, the feet were a critical link, via the sense of touch, with the world that we lived in. Honoring this evolutionary history, many runners have found that not only are they better runners when the sensitive link between the feet and ground is maintained, but also more satisfied runners. Perhaps the primal activity of running touches the heart a bit easier when our ancestral connections to the earth are, even minimally, maintained.

Running the last few meters to the summit of Grey Butte in central Oregon  while avoiding the surrounding rain showers. The Terra Kiger 5 offers a nice balance between foot protection and sensitivity  ensuring that one can still feel a bit of the terrain underfoot  like this scree  but that it won't damage the foot to push the speeds.
Running the last few meters to the summit of Grey Butte in central Oregon, while avoiding the surrounding rain showers. The Terra Kiger 5 offers a nice balance between foot protection and sensitivity, ensuring that one can still feel a bit of the terrain underfoot, like this scree, but that it won't damage the foot to push the speeds.

Unquestionably, we now run differently than we did in the past or would be if we had no shoes on our feet. The fact that running is largely competitive, either with others or ourselves, means that we demand more protection to be able to run faster and further, and are willing to sacrifice sensitivity as a trade-off. Since trail running shoe designs tend to reflect this, we weighted sensitivity as only 10% of a shoe's overall score, while foot protection is weighted as 30%. However, we tested these two metrics pretty much the same way, by repeatedly running back and forth over the most jagged patches of rocks we could find, and noticing the relative differences in the how our feet felt in different shoes. Sensitivity, then, tends to be somewhat in opposition to foot protection, although a few well-balanced designs afford roughly equal amounts of each, in our estimation.

The Altra Superior 4, relying on a scant amount of foam cushioning, is perhaps the most sensitive of this group, but also comes with an optional removable StoneGuard rock shield, which is a thin, flexible insert that can be added underneath the insole for added protection, and naturally dampens the sensitivity a tad. However, we find that adding this protection reduces the volume of the shoe enough that it is no longer comfortable for us to run in, and after asking everyone we have seen with these shoes whether they use it, they all concur that they prefer to run without it in place. We graded the model based on not having the rock shield, thus enhancing its natural sensitivity. Very light shoes are usually the most sensitive as well. The Hoka Evo Jawz is also one of the lightest on underfoot protection, a reliable indicator of sensitivity, and should be among the first shoes considered for someone who values trail feel more than protection. As a somewhat less important aspect of a shoe's performance, we only allowed sensitivity to account for 10% of a shoe's overall score.

Conclusion


There are so many trail running shoes available on the market today that choosing the best pair can present a real challenge. Even after testing the very best shoes available for literally hundreds of hours, we still have a hard time choosing the one that we like best, and indeed prefer to have a quiver to choose from based upon the run planned for each day. We hope that the information that we have presented here has helped make your choice easier, and encourage you to delve deeper into the metrics to better understand which shoe will be optimal for your needs.

These shoes grip the ground as well as a set of dog's claws! The Peregrines are a solid bet for any type of terrain where enhanced traction is valued above all else.
These shoes grip the ground as well as a set of dog's claws! The Peregrines are a solid bet for any type of terrain where enhanced traction is valued above all else.


Andy Wellman