Reviews You Can Rely On

Soto Amicus Review

This affordable and fuel-efficient canister stove is also tiny and ultralight, perfect for your next backcountry adventure
soto amicus backpacking stove review
Whether making oatmeal, preparing coffee, or boiling water for a freeze-dried meal, this stove performed amicably (get it?) across all metrics.
Credit: Jared Ross
Best Buy Award
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:  $45 List | $40.90 at Amazon
Pros:  Ultralight, fuel efficient, affordable, quick to boil even in wind
Cons:  A bit loud, possibly less durable pot stabilizers
Manufacturer:   Soto
By Mary Witlacil ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  May 9, 2022
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
74
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#3 of 21
  • Fuel Efficiency - 25% 7.0
  • Weight - 25% 8.0
  • Simmering Ability - 20% 7.0
  • Ease of Use - 15% 8.0
  • Boil Time - 15% 7.0

Our Verdict

Since 2010 Soto has become an industry leader for backpacking stoves that produce high-octane blue flames even in inclement weather. The Soto Amicus is no exception. It scores favorably across every metric in our review and does for less money than other Soto stoves. It is ultralight, compact, easy to use, and performed well in our boil, wind, and fuel efficiency tests. The pot stabilizers swing into position with a spring rivet and provide enough support for most 1 liter pots. The stabilizers may be less durable over the long haul, but this stove is still an excellent option for backpackers, bike packers, and alpine climbers looking to save weight, and thru-hikers looking for an affordable option.

Compare to Similar Products

 
soto amicus backpacking stove review
This Product
Soto Amicus
Awards Best Buy Award   Best Buy Award  
Price $45 List
$40.90 at Amazon
$45 List
$36.80 at Amazon
$25.19 at Amazon
Compare at 2 sellers
$17.00 List
$16.95 at Amazon
$30 List
$21.82 at Amazon
Overall Score Sort Icon
74
63
62
55
43
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Ultralight, fuel efficient, affordable, quick to boil even in windLightweight, affordable, easy to useGood at simmering, simple operationTiny, light, cheapSimmers well, easy to set up, inexpensive
Cons A bit loud, possibly less durable pot stabilizersRelatively fuel inefficient, slow to boil in wind, average simmer ability, no auto-ignitorNo piezoelectric igniter, slow to boil, bulky, somewhat heavySmall burner head, poor wind performance, not great fuel efficiencySlow, heavy, fuel inefficient
Bottom Line This affordable and fuel-efficient canister stove is also tiny and ultralight, perfect for your next backcountry adventureA low-fuss, affordable, and lightweight backpacking stove for summer backpacking trips in milder weatherThis standard small canister stove is good for simmering but bulky and a bit heavy in your packA shockingly small, ultra lightweight, and straightforward backpacking stove at an impressively low priceThis inexpensive, heavy, and bulky stove takes a while to boil, but simmers reasonably well
Rating Categories Soto Amicus Optimus Crux Lite Primus Essential Trail BRS-3000T Coleman Peak 1
Fuel Efficiency (25%)
7.0
5.0
7.0
2.0
3.0
Weight (25%)
8.0
8.0
6.0
10.0
5.0
Simmering Ability (20%)
7.0
6.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
Ease of Use (15%)
8.0
7.0
6.0
5.0
5.0
Boil Time (15%)
7.0
5.0
4.0
2.0
1
Specs Soto Amicus Optimus Crux Lite Primus Essential Trail BRS-3000T Coleman Peak 1
Category Small Canister Small Canister Small Canister Small Canister Small Canister
Essential Weight (stove or stove + integrated pot only) 2.79 oz 2.7 oz 4.5 oz 0.9 oz 6.5 oz
Trail Weight (stove, fuel, pot) 14.92 oz 14.81 oz 16.63 oz 12.63 oz 18.63 oz
Wind Boil Time (1 liter, 2-4mph) 6:30 min:sec 7:54 min: sec 10:10 min 14:45 min:sec >15 min
Boil Time (1 liter) 3:52 min: sec 4:35 min: sec 5:30 min:sec 5:13 min:sec 7:08 min:sec
Packed Weight (stove + all accessories) 3.5 oz 3 oz 4.5 oz 1 oz 6.5 oz
Dimensions 3.9" × 0.7" × 6.5" 2.8" x 2.2" x 2.2" 4.3" x 2.4" 2" x 1.2" x 1.3" 5.1" x 5.5" x 4.3"
Fuel Type Isobutane Isobutane, propane Isobutane Isobutane Isobutane
Additional Included Items Stuff sack Storage bag None Stuff sack None
Piezo Igniter? Yes No No No No

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Soto Amicus is an impressive addition to a competitive field of canister stoves for backpacking. It is affordable, incredibly lightweight, and very fuel-efficient. The long fuel valve and push-button ignitor make it easy to use. The stove reliably produces a blue flame to ensure fast cooking temps, and the pot stabilizers provide sufficient support for 1-2 liter pots. Whether you're looking for your first backpacking stove or you're looking to shave some grams from your kit without sacrificing durability, this stove is a worthy contender.

Performance Comparison


soto amicus backpacking stove review - this stove performed well across all metrics and took the edge off...
This stove performed well across all metrics and took the edge off of preparing breakfast on a cold morning.
Credit: Jared Ross

Fuel Efficiency


For being such a tiny stove, the Amicus performed surprisingly well in our fuel efficiency test. Using our wind and no-wind boil tests as a guide, it used an average of 8.9% of a 4-ounce fuel canister to bring 1 liter of water to a boil.


To determine fuel efficiency, we tested the stoves in our garage "lab" at 5,000 feet in Fort Collins, CO. We started by weighing a new 4-ounce fuel canister and then boiled 1 liter of 58° F water in the presence of a box fan on "low." We used an anemometer to measure the fan's "wind" to ensure it was constant at 2-4 mph. Once the water boiled, we weighed the fuel again, brought another 1-liter kettle of water to a boil, and weighed the canister one final time. We determine the percentage of fuel used in these wind and no-wind boil tests and take the average between the two to determine fuel efficiency.

soto amicus backpacking stove review - this stove delivers a searing hot blue flame even in the presence of...
This stove delivers a searing hot blue flame even in the presence of wind.
Credit: Jared Ross

Weight


The Soto Amicus is one of the lightest stoves in our review. The stove alone weighs only 2.79 ounces — though stove weight alone isn't the whole story.


To help you make an informed decision about which backpacking stove to buy, we determined the "trail weight" for each stove. This allows you to effectively compare stand-alone models with integrated stoves that come with their own pots. Trail weight refers to the weight of the stove sans accessories (like stuff sacks), plus the weight of a small fuel canister (7.35 ounces), and the average weight of the five most popular 1-liter titanium pots (4.78 ounces). We really like the 5.6 oz TOAKS 1100ml Titanium Pot, because it is lightweight and has a lid that doubles as a frying pan. The trail weight of the Amicus with a pot and canister is a scant 14.92 ounces. You can find a more lightweight stove, but not one that works as efficiently as this one.

soto amicus backpacking stove review - this stove weighs a scant 79 grams or 2.79 ounces, and is...
This stove weighs a scant 79 grams or 2.79 ounces, and is impressively compact.
Credit: Jared Ross

Simmering Ability


The Amicus performed well in this metric owing to the long wire fuel valve, which allows you to dial down the burner to sustain a low enough flame to simmer without flickering out.


To evaluate simmering ability, we test how well each stove can make slow-cooked oatmeal without scorching the pot. The Amicus could handle a low enough temp to cook our oats without leaving a char mark on our pot — a win-win if you ask us. While the wind hampers the stove's ability to simmer, if you can shelter the stove, it can still deliver a consistent low flame to avoid destroying more complicated meals.

soto amicus backpacking stove review - the flame is able to dial down low enough to cook oatmeal without...
The flame is able to dial down low enough to cook oatmeal without scorching the pot.
Credit: Jared Ross

Ease Of Use


Like other small canister stoves, there is practically no learning curve with the Amicus.


This stove has a Piezo ignitor that worked occasionally, which is why it didn't ace this metric. You can buy the stove without an ignitor to save $5, but why would you when an ignitor makes the stove so much easier to use. Even though the ignitor on our test stove didn't prove to be 100% reliable, we would probably still choose to pay the extra $5 because when it does work, it beats searching for your lighter when all you want is to smash dinner.

soto amicus backpacking stove review - our review team found the piezoelectric igniter to be fairy...
Our review team found the piezoelectric igniter to be fairy unreliable. Not a deal breaker, but definitely a bummer.
Credit: Jared Ross

The wire fuel valve is long enough that you can reach it without scalding your hands, should your pot boil over. The pot stabilizers rotate on a spring rivet and secure with a small metal tab and hook. Once in place, these feel secure. The Amicus is stable enough to use with most 1 liter pots and is likely stable enough to use with lower profile 2-liter pots. In our fuel efficiency tests, we were able to test the stove with a large 1.7-quart kettle without the stove threatening to topple over. The spring rivets are a novel design feature, but in our experience, components like these may weaken or get dirty over time — but for our use, they seem sufficiently durable and stable.

soto amicus backpacking stove review - the stove has four pot stabilizers that secure into place with a...
The stove has four pot stabilizers that secure into place with a metal hook and tab. It is quick and easy to swing these into position.
Credit: Jared Ross

If you decide to travel with the stove's stuff sack, it is made out of a burly fabric that is burn resistant enough to handle putting a hot stove inside after a quick round of coffee (though we don't recommend testing it by sticking it in a fire). One reason we docked points in this metric was that you have to open the fuel valve to slot the Amicus in its stuff sack. We understand this is a fickle complaint, but when you're up for a 4 am alpine start and need to make coffee, it can be hard to remember to close the valve before pairing it with a fuel canister.

soto amicus backpacking stove review - the stuff sack pairs snugly with the stove. to fit the stove back...
The stuff sack pairs snugly with the stove. To fit the stove back into its stuff sack, you have to rotate open the fuel valve so it will sit flush against the stove rod. Just make sure you close the valve before you affix the stove to a canister.
Credit: Jared Ross

Boil Time


Without the presence of wind, the Amicus boiled water in 3 minutes and 52 seconds. In our wind test, it boiled water in 6 minutes and 32 seconds.


To determine boil time, we took the average between the two boil tests to compare the stoves across the review. The Amicus had a competitive score, ranking it near the top of the pack. In truly inclement weather, we recommend creating a windbreak for your stove with rocks to ensure a more consistent flame.

soto amicus backpacking stove review - the burner is recessed and protected by a slight lip, which gives it...
The burner is recessed and protected by a slight lip, which gives it more wind protection than other small canister stoves.
Credit: Jared Ross

Value


The Amicus is an excellent value if you ask us, and if you're here, you kinda did. It is an affordable ultralight canister stove that is fuel-efficient, easy to use, and boils quickly regardless of conditions. The pot stabilizers provide impressive stability, the ignitor lit the stove fairly consistently, and it commands minimal space in your pack. Can you find stoves that perform better in one of our metrics? Sure, but we haven't found any that perform as well across all metrics at such an affordable price.

Conclusion


Our review team was thoroughly impressed by how consistently the Soto Amicus performed across all of our review metrics. If you are in the market for an affordable but ultralight stove to boil water for dehydrated food and coffee, this stove might be an ideal option for you.

Mary Witlacil
You Might Also Like

Ad-free. Influence-free. Powered by Testing.

GearLab is founded on the principle of honest, objective, reviews. Our experts test thousands of products each year using thoughtful test plans that bring out key performance differences between competing products. And, to assure complete independence, we buy all the products we test ourselves. No cherry-picked units sent by manufacturers. No sponsored content. No ads. Just real, honest, side-by-side testing and comparison.

Learn More