Reviews You Can Rely On

The 6 Best Four Season Tents of 2022

We tested four season tents from Black Diamond, MSR, Hilleberg, The North Face, and more to find the best shelters for your all-season needs
Best Four Season Tents of 2022
Putting the Hilleberg Jannu through its paces in harsh conditions on an extended research trip to Greenland.
Credit: Graham McDowell
By Ian Nicholson ⋅ Review Editor
Friday November 11, 2022
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more

Our outdoor experts have tested the best four-season tents over the last 11 years. This review features 14 of the market's most tried and true popular models, tested by our team, including international guides, weekend warriors, and recreational expeditionists. We've tested across the globe, with each tent in all seasons, enduring conditions of sandy deserts, windswept ridges, frigid lows, and hot highs. After field testing, we meticulously assessed key features and noted which tents were best for particular niche conditions. All of this research is done to help you find the best tent, no matter your budget.

From the backyard to the backcountry, our team of experts has you covered when it comes to sleeping outside. We have in-depth reviews covering the best camping tents, best backpacking tents, and even the ultimate ultralight tents. We also have a number of other reviews for mountaineering and climbing gear as well as eight different reviews to help you find the best sleeping bag.

Editor's Note: We updated this review on November 11, 2022 with three new models and we retested two other models.

Top 17 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 17
< Previous | Compare | Next >
 
Awards Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award   Top Pick Award 
Price $900 List$660 List$750 List
$749.95 at REI
$500 List
$429.95 at Amazon
$800 List
Overall Score Sort Icon
78
77
73
72
72
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Bomber, great durability, compact footprint, lighter than average weight, fantastic balance of strength, weight, and livability, ample guy pointsVersatile, lightweight, double wall design works far better in rain than single wall models, handles condensation well, big vestibules, easy to pitchHuge hooped vestibule, one of the lighter double wall options, bomber design, easy to set-up, durable construction, does well in the rainVersatile, handles moderate snow loads well, giant vestibule, roomy interior, easy to set-up, the vestibule is removable and can be left behind to save weight, handles condensation wellIncluded removable hooped vestibule, above average breathability among single wall tents, excellent ventilation, good headroom, compressible, robust
Cons Poor ventilation, slightly tricky setup, insufficient guy lines includedIsn't as strong as other 4-season models, offers a good but not excellent packed sizeManaged condensation and interior moisture just okay, good-but-not-great headroom, middle-of-the-road weight-wise, small interior doors, vestibule is hard to get taught and proved less useful than other small secondary vestibulesRespectable size and weight for how spacious it isGuylines are light duty, not quite as storm worthy as other models, fabric is less resistant to tearing and long term exposure to UV
Bottom Line All-around uses are this model's forte, but it's still robust enough for when the weather turns gnarThe ski and summer mountaineering focused design perfect for almost any trip you can dream upA high performing all-arounder that does most things well but isn't the absolute best at anythingIt converts nicely in both 3-season and 4-season conditions, and has a huge vestibule and spacious dimensionsA versatile single wall tent that works well for a greater range of conditions than most other 2-pole bivy-tent models
Rating Categories Black Diamond Eldorado MSR Access 2 MSR Remote 2 Sierra Designs Conv... The North Face Assa...
Weight (27%)
7.0
8.0
5.0
8.0
9.0
Weather/Storm Resistance (25%)
9.0
7.0
8.0
6.0
6.0
Livability (18%)
7.0
7.0
8.0
5.0
7.0
Ease of Set-up (10%)
7.0
9.0
9.0
9.0
7.0
Durability (10%)
10.0
7.0
8.0
7.0
7.0
Versatility (10%)
7.0
9.0
8.0
10.0
6.0
Specs Black Diamond Eldorado MSR Access 2 MSR Remote 2 Sierra Designs Conv... The North Face Assa...
Minimum Weight (only tent, fly & poles) 4.5 lbs 3.80 lbs 6.97 lbs 5.88 lbs 3.5 lbs (no vestibule)
Floor Dimensions 87" x 51 in 84 x 50 in 87" x 55 in. 84" x 55 in. (at head) x 49 in. (at feet) 82 48 in
Peak Height 43 in 42 in 43 in 43 in 42 in
Measured Weight, with tent, stakes, guylines, pole bag 4.9 lbs 4.1 lbs 6.50 lbs 4.1 lbs 5.44 lbs
Type Single Wall Double Wall Double Wall Double Wall Single Wall
Packed Size 7" x 19 in 18 x 6 in 7" x 20 in. 7" x 15.75 in. 7 x 22 in
Floor Area 31 sq ft 29 sq ft 33 sq. ft. 30.3 sq. ft. 27.3 sq ft
Vestibule Area 9 sq ft (optional) 17.5 sq ft 22 sq. ft. 16.4 sq. ft. 10 sq ft
Number of Doors 1 2 0.3 in. 0.32 in. 1
Number of Poles 2 2 2 1 4
Pole Diameter 8 mm 9.3 mm 9.3 9 mm 9.3 mm
Number of Pockets Side: 4 Ceiling: 0 Side: 2 Ceiling: 0 Side: 2 Ceiling: 0 Side: 2 Ceiling: 0 Side: 2 Ceiling: 0
Pole Material Easton Aluminum 7075-E9 Easton Syclone Easton Syclone Yunan UL Aluminum DAC Featherlite NSL
Rainfly Fabric 3 layer ToddTex 20D nylon ripstop 68D ripstop polyester 1800mm polyurethane & DWR 20D Nylon Ripstop, Silicone/1200mm PeU FUTERLIGHT
Floor Fabric Unknown 30D nylon ripstop 40D ripstop nylon 10,000mm Durashield polyurethane & DWR 68D 210T Poly Ripstop DWR/2000MM PeU 40D ripstop nylon w/3,000mm PUR/silicone coating


Best Overall 4 Season Tent


Black Diamond Eldorado


78
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Weight 7.0
  • Weather/Storm Resistance 9.0
  • Livability 7.0
  • Ease of Set-up 7.0
  • Durability 10.0
  • Versatility 7.0
Functional Weight: 4.9 pounds | Floor dimensions (L x W): 87 x 51 inches
REASONS TO BUY
Bomber two-pole design
Exceptionally durable
Fabric handles moisture and condensation well
Compact footprint
The fantastic overall balance of strength, weight, and livability
REASONS TO AVOID
Mediocre ventilation
Set up takes practice to become proficient
Heavier than ultralight bivy tents

The Black Diamond Eldorado balances excellence through all the metrics. It's stormworthy enough for major routes in Alaska and Patagonia, where its integrity has been proven time and time again. It holds up to fierce winds and heavy snow more effectively than any 2-pole bivy tent we have tested. It also offers slightly more interior space among two-pole bivy options. It is 4-5 inches longer than most competitors, which taller folks will appreciate. Its Todd-Tex fabric is the best-performing material of all the single-wall options. While it is heavier, it's far more breathable and handles condensation noticeably better than most other single-wall shelters.

While hardly "heavy," this tent isn't nearly as light or compact as many new-wave bivy tents. While it has a trail weight of under five pounds, it's more than a pound heavier than the lightest bivy style options and roughly 25% larger in packed volume. That extra weight goes into this tent's high strength and comfort scores. The internally pitched design is super strong despite only having two poles, but there is a learning curve to mastering its setup. The bottom line remains; if you are only going to own one 4-season tent for a wide range of alpine adventures, then the Black Diamond Eldorado is our top recommendation.

Read more: Black Diamond Eldorado review

best overall 4 season tent
The Black Diamond Eldorado is one of the quintessential all-around 4 season mountaineering tents. Tried and true, it performs well at everything but isn't the absolute best at any one thing.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Best All-Around Double Wall Tent


MSR Access 2


77
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Weight 8.0
  • Weather/Storm Resistance 7.0
  • Livability 7.0
  • Ease of Set-up 9.0
  • Durability 7.0
  • Versatility 9.0
Weight: 4.1 pounds | Floor dimensions (L x W): 84 x 50 inches
REASONS TO BUY
Exceptionally versatile
Fairly spacious interior
Lightweight
Two good-sized vestibules
Performs better in the rain than single-wall models
Easy to pitch
Handles condensation well
REASONS TO AVOID
Not as strong as other 4 season models
We wish it packed down smaller

The MSR Access 2 is one of the market's lightest double-wall 4-season tent options. While we love single-wall shelters for their compact size and weight-saving benefits, they are rarely versatile and perform poorly in the rain. The Access is unique: it is light and packs down small while offering versatility. It is one of the lighter models to feature two doors: no need to crawl over your partner in the middle of the night. We stayed dry on a rainy week-long ski of the Ptarmigan Traverse, even in the sleeting rain. We found it perfect for summertime mountaineering in the lower 48 and southern Canada, modest snow camping trips, and multi-day ski tours. We would even take it on the occasional backpacking trip. It excels at versatility, low weight, and the ability to keep its occupants dry in heavy rain.

While the Access 2 is robust and unquestionably a 4 season shelter, it isn't quite expedition-worthy. We wouldn't take it to the Alaska Range, the Karakoram, or Antarctica as a primary, long-term camping tent. It handles moderate winds and snow-loading, but this is not the tent you want in extreme conditions. We love it for longer ski traverses or more summertime mountaineering routes in less far-flung ranges where moisture management is key.

Read more: MSR Access 2 review

4 season tent - best all-around double wall tent
The Access is a solid 4-season tent that handles moderate snow loading and wind well. It keeps its inhabitants incredibly dry even in the pouring rain, which was appreciated during spring ski-mountaineering traverses and rainy mountaineering trips.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Best Overall Value


REI Arete ASL 2


70
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Weight 6.0
  • Weather/Storm Resistance 7.0
  • Livability 7.0
  • Ease of Set-up 9.0
  • Durability 7.0
  • Versatility 8.0
Weight: 5.87 pounds | Floor dimensions (L x W): 88 x 60 inches
REASONS TO BUY
Relatively lightweight, particularly for a double-wall tent
Great price point
Interior fabric handles condensation well
Longer-than-average dimensions make it a solid option for taller people
Decent headroom
REASONS TO AVOID
One of the least bomber three-pole designs
Vestibule is tiny
Only one door

The REI Arete ASL 2 is a high-value and versatile double-walled model for four-season use. For the price, there is no better option. Our taller testers appreciated its roomy dimensions and were impressed by its low weight and packed volume. It handles condensation and rain extremely well with a newly designed interior, a huge zip panel, and loads of mesh. It has a relatively high peak height and long internal dimensions. The 3.5 pole design provides good headroom and livability.

This model offers good storm worthiness, but it isn't quite a go-anywhere, do-anything shelter. It doesn't provide the top-notch storm protection required for extreme environments. It's ideal for summer mountaineering on peaks like Mt. Rainier or Mt. Shasta, spring ski tours, or winter camping near or below the tree line. It doesn't fare particularly well in moderate-to-strong winds and wouldn't be our first choice for a full-on expedition tent to a place like Denali. However, this model is tough to beat if you're planning more moderate mountainous adventures in the lower 48 or Southern Canadian Ranges and are looking for a great value option.

Read more: REI Arete ASL 2 review

4 season tent - best overall value
The REI Arete SL easily wins our best buy proving a versatile shelter that is reasonably light and reasonably strong that will work well for most of the types of trips the majority of people want to go on all at an incredibly good price.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Best for Weight and Packed Size


Black Diamond Firstlight


62
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Weight 10.0
  • Weather/Storm Resistance 3.0
  • Livability 7.0
  • Ease of Set-up 6.0
  • Durability 5.0
  • Versatility 4.0
Weight: 3.31 pounds | Floor dimensions (L x W): 82" x 48 inches
REASONS TO BUY
Super light
Small packed size
Advantageous tiny footprint
REASONS TO AVOID
Not completely waterproof
Not as easy to pitch as other models
Poor ventilation and breathability
Poo wind resistance

The Black Diamond Firstlight is ideal for fair-weather multi-day alpine climbing and ski touring adventures because of its exceptionally low weight and ability to compress smaller than any other model in our review. Its small size and tiny footprint allow you to pitch it nearly anywhere there is room for two people to lie down. Its bug netting means as long as it is nice out, you can sleep with the door wide open without getting bit. We don't love it for extended storms or harsh four-season conditions, as it isn't that strong nor completely waterproof. Built with a newer version of Black Diamond's proprietary NanoShield fabric, it has created the most water-resistant Firstlight, helping it handle a little rain or snow fine. Still, it can be challenging to stay dry for extended periods. You might be wondering, why bring a tent if it isn't, particularly water resistant, wind resistant, and suffers from poor condensation?

This model borders on mediocre for wet or stormy conditions. It offers just enough water resistance for short-duration "surprise" afternoon thunderstorms. It works well for fair-weather areas like the Sierra but not for consistently wet and stormy spots. However, this is our top choice for trips where weight is the main consideration.

Read more: Black Diamond Firstlight review

4 season tent - best for weight and packed size
While the Black Diamond Firstlight isn't necessarily the best all-around four-season tent, it is an excellent option for certain trips where weight and compressed size are of the utmost importance. The Firstlight is seen here in its element, camped in Washington's North Cascades.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Incredible for Extended Expeditions


Mountain Hardwear Trango 2


67
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Weight 2.0
  • Weather/Storm Resistance 9.0
  • Livability 9.0
  • Ease of Set-up 9.0
  • Durability 8.0
  • Versatility 6.0
Weight: 9.64 pounds | Floor dimensions (L x W): 85 x 64 inches
REASONS TO BUY
Strong and proven in the world's most extreme places
Incredibly spacious
Great pockets
Easy to pitch in higher winds
Versatile
Big vestibule
REASONS TO AVOID
Not the best headroom despite the roomy dimensions
Heavy
Okay condensation performance

The Mountain Hardwear Trango 2 is one of the most expedition-worthy 4 season tents ever built. It's perfect for harsh weather or extended base camp adventures. It has been from Antarctica to Mt. Everest to the North Pole. It has accompanied people on some of the most remote expeditions to the ends of the earth. While it's overkill for more modest summertime mountaineering in the Tetons, Canadian Rockies, or the North Cascades, it's worth every bit of weight when the conditions turn gnarly. With its 4-pole design (not including its 5th hooped vestibule pole), the Trango 2 is easily one of the strongest shelters on the market and is as easy as it gets to pitch in high winds. It's the roomiest two-person shelter in our review, long term tent dwellers witill appreciate it. Its spacious vestibule will store plenty of gear or provide a place to cook when you can't hang outside any longer.

The Trango is 100% designed for expedition use, and these attributes make it great in the nuclear wind or dumping snow; however, it's a little on the heavy side for multi-day ski touring or summertime mountaineering. If you aren't planning to go on an expedition anytime soon, you should look elsewhere for something lighter and more packable for modest alpine objectives. However, for those looking to shelter from high winds and heavy snowfall, this tank of a tent is excellent as your home away from home in the world's most extreme environments.

Read more: Mountain Hardwear Trango 2 review

4 season tent - incredible for extended expeditions
Continuing to improve, the latest Trango 2 is built with expeditions, long-term living, and some of the world's fiercest weather in mind. Though slightly heavy for weekend trips in your local mountain range, it's perfect for extended trips where strength and livability supersede weight in level of importance.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Alpine Versatility


The North Face Assault 2 FUTURELIGHT


72
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Weight 9.0
  • Weather/Storm Resistance 6.0
  • Livability 7.0
  • Ease of Set-up 7.0
  • Durability 7.0
  • Versatility 6.0
Weight: 3.75 lbs / 5 lbs w/ included vestibule | Floor dimensions (L x W): 82 x 42 in
REASONS TO BUY
Lightweight
Great ventilation
One of the more versatile single-wall tents
Easy setup
Sweet included vestibule
Respectable headroom for a "bivy tent"
REASONS TO AVOID
Just okay strength
Care must be taken with the poles while pitching
Only okay in the rain
So-So moister management if all the vents need to be sealed

Overall we found the Assault 2 FUTURELIGHT one of the more versatile single-wall shelters in our review. This newest version of the Assault uses The North Face's FUTURELIGHT material. FUTURELIGHT is The North Face's proprietary air-permeable fabric. After extensive testing, we found it offered the best breathability save for those in Black Diamond's Bibler line and made with tougher but much heavier Tod-Tex fabric. This fabric and three large vents allow this tent to adapt well to various conditions. Making this tent even more adaptable is its included but removable hooped vestibule which lets you decide if you want to leave it behind and save weight or bring it more covered area.

While pretty light if weight is your biggest concern, you can get a lighter, more compact tent if versatility and comfort are less important than weight. This model also wouldn't be our first choice for fierce weather or extended hangouts as our sole shelter on an extended expedition. In the end, while The North Face Assault 2 FUTURELIGHTis not the lightest tent in our review, it isn't heavy either. It strikes a nice balance between weight and versatility. While not a true "expedition tent," it is more than enough for the typical mountain trip.

Read more: The North Face Assault 2 FUTURELIGHT review

4 season tent - the advance pro isn&#039;t particularly versatile but is fantastic at...
The Advance Pro isn't particularly versatile but is fantastic at what it is designed to do, which is to be as light and compact as possible while still offering top-notch storm protection.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price
78
Black Diamond Eldorado
black diamond eldorado 4 season tent review
$900
Editors' Choice Award
77
MSR Access 2
msr access 2 4 season tent review
$660
Editors' Choice Award
73
MSR Remote 2
msr remote 2 4 season tent review
$750
72
Sierra Designs Convert 2
sierra designs convert 2 4 season tent review
$500
72
The North Face Assault 2 FUTURELIGHT
the north face assault 2 futurelight 4 season tent review
$800
Top Pick Award
72
Black Diamond Ahwahnee
black diamond ahwahnee 4 season tent review
$900
72
Hilleberg Jannu
hilleberg jannu 4 season tent review
$1,075
71
MSR Advance Pro
msr advance pro 4 season tent review
$626
Top Pick Award
71
Mountain Hardwear Outpost 2
mountain hardwear outpost 2 4 season tent review
$700
71
Mountain Hardwear AC 2
mountain hardwear ac 2 4 season tent review
$750
70
REI Arete ASL 2
rei arete asl 2 4 season tent review
$449
Best Buy Award
70
The North Face Mountain 25
the north face mountain 25 4 season tent review
$690
67
Mountain Hardwear Trango 2
mountain hardwear trango 2 4 season tent review
$850
Top Pick Award
65
Hilleberg Nallo 2
hilleberg nallo 2 4 season tent review
$815
65
Hilleberg Nammatj 2
hilleberg nammatj 2 4 season tent review
$875
64
Black Diamond HiLight
black diamond hilight 4 season tent review
$500
62
Black Diamond Firstlight
black diamond firstlight 4 season tent review
$450
Top Pick Award

4 season tent - we tested all of these models ourselves across the western...
We tested all of these models ourselves across the Western Hemisphere. Lead tester Ian Nicholson has personally slept in every model in our review, putting them through their paces from Alaska to Patagonia. Here The North Face Assault 2 above the Inspiration Glacier with Forbidden Peak in the distance.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Why You Should Trust Us


This review is crafted by long-time OutdoorGearLab contributor and professional mountain guide Ian Nicholson. Ian is an internationally licensed IFMGA/UIAGM mountain guide who has spent almost 2,000 nights sleeping in a tent over the last two decades. As a result, few people can offer the level of expertise and insight Ian can regarding 4-season shelters.

4 season tent
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Ian's professional mountain guide background ranges from being a member of the AMGA's (American Mountain Guides Association) and AIARE's National Instructor teams to teaching professional-level courses for both professional training bodies. Ian has guided ten Denali expeditions and completed five more trips to other areas of Alaska ranges in addition to first ascents in Patagonia, the Waddington Range, the North Cascades to and more than 30 week-plus long ski traverses around the world. Few people consider their shelter options as deeply as Ian, obsessed with researching the latest products, their strengths, and best applications and putting them through their paces. While Ian spearheads this review, we made sure to draw upon a pool of more than a dozen individuals and guide services.

4 season tent - we compared each oneand how they stood up to rain, snow, and wind as...
We compared each oneand how they stood up to rain, snow, and wind as well as each model's weight, livability, adaptability, and versatility,
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Most of the information comes from specific tent testing that has been happening continuously since 2008. Test locations include Alberta and British Columbia, Alaska, Patagonia, Antarctica, Peru, Bolivia, Aconcagua, and other locations worldwide.

4 season tent - there are many good four-season contenders, and they each excel at...
There are many good four-season contenders, and they each excel at different things. Some are stronger, some lighter, some more adaptable. Therefore, it is essential to figure out your needs and what types of trips you plan to use your tent for. Here, we're testing on the East Ridge of Eldorado, North Cascades, WA.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

We examine several factors and then determine which are the most important in the functionality of a 4 season tent. By having a long testing period and various sources of information, we can gain valuable insight into things like long-term durability and what models fared better or worse in a diverse range of weather conditions. These tents have seen high winds and countless snowy, rainy, stormy, and sunny days.

4 season tent - to make sure we got an extremely well-rounded comparison we made...
To make sure we got an extremely well-rounded comparison we made sure to draw on the experience of over a dozen mountain guides, professional climbers, and guide services. Here a Black Diamond Firstlight is pitched above the Coleman Glacier with Mt. Baker looming above.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Analysis and Test Results


We've selected a wide variety of 4 season tents. We test super lightweight to heavy and mega stormworthy. All tents in this review can withstand a host of conditions, from super sunny conditions to cutting winds. Each is scored against the metrics to help you filter out which tent buying considerations are important for you.

4 season tent - some of our test group, including (front to back) the black diamond...
Some of our test group, including (front to back) the Black Diamond Ahwahnee, Eldorado, Fitzroy, and Firstlight.
Credit: Max Neale

Value


If you've been searching for a 4-season tent, you know they aren't cheap. We help assess the right shelter — without overpaying for your needs. Standing out among the rest for value are both The North Face Assault 2 and REI Arete ASL 2. Both represent a good overall performance score at a great price. All have different niches and are ones to consider if you're looking to pinch some pennies and save a little money. These tents will be especially appealing for people just getting into 4 season conditions and those who only plan to do a trip or two a year in more moderate environments.


Weather Resistance


This is the most important metric. We assessed a tent's ability to protect its occupants from the elements and the outside environment. The best models keep you dry without bending, changing shape, or excessively flapping in high winds.


We pitched each model on breezy, exposed ridges and driving snow and rain. Once pitched, we compared each model and how well they kept us dry in bad weather. We look at pole design, type, fabrics, vestibules, and other features that affect each shelter's strength. Some of the largest contributing factors include the number of pole intersections, the number of points, and the mechanism for attaching the inner tent to the poles, along with the number of points and mechanisms for attaching the outer tent to the poles. Finally, we look at the number, location, and quality of guy points. We learned from our testing that pole design and quality are the most significant factors influencing wind resistance and overall strength.

4 season tent - we looked at each model analytically for its storm resistance but...
We looked at each model analytically for its storm resistance but also tested each tent in the field over several years. We compared them on how they handled snow loading, strong winds, and rain. Here the Black Diamond Eldorado is shown with its optional vestibule put to the test during an early season snowstorm.
Credit: John Miner

Pole Design


The most significant factors contributing to a tent's strength are the number of poles, their layout/design, and the number of pole crossings relative to the tent's size and external height. More full-length poles and more crossings equate to more strength.

4 season tent - all the tents in our review are suitable for 4-season conditions...
All the tents in our review are suitable for 4-season conditions, but some can't quite handle the harsher end of the spectrum. This photo shows 60+ mph winds ripping over the upper West Buttress on Denali.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

How strongly do you need your 4 season tent to be? All the models we reviewed are robust enough for use in at least moderate 4-season conditions. These tents should withstand strong winds greater than 35 mph with little protection and modest snowfall. Every tent we reviewed works above treeline for summertime mountaineering objectives, multi-day ski touring adventures, and modest mid-winter use.

4 season tent - more pole crossings are generally indicative of greater strength...
More pole crossings are generally indicative of greater strength. The Fitzroy's four poles and seven crossings are similar in design to other models like the Hilleberg Tarra, and Mountain 25, all of which are the absolute strongest in our review. The Fitzroy is one of the only ones that pitch from the inside, which is one of the reasons why it's lightweight.
Credit: John Miner

While all the shelters we tested qualify as 4-season tents, not every tent can handle all 4-season conditions. They won't excel in the "Great Ranges" like the Alaska Range, and Antarctica, the Karakoram, or extended time above treeline in strong winds and heavy snow loads. If you are going into serious conditions, choose one of the more robust "4-season" models with more poles and pole crossings.

4 season tent - if extended trips, extreme conditions, or expedition use are in your...
If extended trips, extreme conditions, or expedition use are in your plans for the future, a sturdier tent with more poles and pole crossings will easily be worth their weight. The North Face Mountain 25 on an early season trip in the North Cascades.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Tent Poles


Tent poles used in the tents we tested range from 8mm to 10.25mm in diameter. Except for a few exceptions, the thicker the pole, the stronger it is.

4 season tent - not all tent poles are created equal; we delve into pole materials...
Not all tent poles are created equal; we delve into pole materials, construction and diameter of each tent's poles and how it plays a roll in each models strength.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

DAC Featherlite NSL Green poles are some of the best aluminum poles. We also liked Easton's new composite pole used on the MSR Access 2, as they can flex much further before breaking.

Fabrics


Fabrics range from ultralight, non-waterproof, wind-breaking materials, as on the Black Diamond Firstlight, to light and robust silicone-coated nylon, found on the Hilleberg models, including the Nammatj 2, and Jannu. They also can include air-permeable materials similar to what you might find in a waterproof jacket in the case of The North Face Assualt FUTURELIGHT to specialized and robust ePTFE laminates (think a much burlier version of a 3-layer Gore-Tex jacket) found in the single-wall Black Diamond Eldorado. We break down each tent's specific fabric in their reviews.

4 season tent - the hilleberg jannu uses kerlon 1800 silnyon, which, despite its...
The Hilleberg Jannu uses Kerlon 1800 silnyon, which, despite its slippery feel, has a breaking strength of 40 lbs and will hold up longer overtime to UV and water damage. Why doesn't every company coat both sides with silicone? Because it's a fair bit more expensive and some companies claim it's overkill. However, we have yet to find anyone that debates that it isn't better long term.
Credit: Graham McDowell

Coatings: Silnylon vs. Polyurethane


There is a difference between a tent covered on both sides with silicone, called sil-nylon, and fabric coated on the outside with silicone and the inside with polyurethane (PU). The latter is cheaper but not as durable and strong. The most robust fly fabric used on a 4 season tent is the Hilleberg Kerlon 1800 sil-nylon, which has a breaking strength of 40 pounds. You can also find this material on their Nammatj and Tarra tents.

4 season tent - black diamond&#039;s bibler line of tents used a proprietary eptfe fabric...
Black Diamond's Bibler line of tents used a proprietary ePTFE fabric (similar to a 3-layer Gore-Tex) called ToddTex. While heavier and not as packable as other models, it's insanely strong and breathes noticeably better than all other single wall models. It has thousands of micro hairs built into the fabric to help moisture pass through it more efficiently.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

PTFE Laminates


The Black Diamond Eldorado, Black Diamond Fitzroy, and Black Diamond Ahwahneeuse a burly PTFE laminate, similar to your waterproof and breathable jackets. The difference is that the inside has tiny hairs that allow more effective moisture and condensation management. PTFE fabric is stronger than most sil-nylon but is a little heavier and bulkier.

Guy Line Points


Most of the 4 season tent options tested have between 4-10 guy line tie-out points. Six is nice for most alpine climbing and ski trips in the lower 48. Eight or more is ideal for expedition use and extreme weather. Guy lines have far more holding power than the lower corners of the tent. They pull from the middle of the tent and get a better angle against the wind to keep your shelter in place.

4 season tent - the tarra standing strong in high winds in red rocks, nevada. (the...
The Tarra standing strong in high winds in Red Rocks, Nevada. (The tents at left are deformed or broken.) The Tarra has four 10.25mm DAC Featherlite NSL Green poles, the strongest available, and a silynon fly fabric with a 40 pound tear strength.
Credit: Max Neale

The Most Weather Resistant


The Mountain Hardwear Trango 2, Black Diamond Fitzroy, and The North Face Mountain 25 offer the greatest strength and weather resistance. They are the most popular on expeditions to Vinson, Everest, and Denali.

4 season tent - the north face mountain 25&#039;s four-pole design, plus an additional...
The North Face Mountain 25's four-pole design, plus an additional pole for the hooped vestibule, is the most common pole-design among 4-season shelters (they maximize strength and pole crossings for the given weight). The TBlack Diamond Fitzroy features a very similar design.
Credit: Ryan O'Connell

Among non-4-pole designs, the Black Diamond Eldorado offers the greatest static strength, with the Hilliberg Jannu checking in as the strongest amongst 3-pole designs. While exceptionally strong, these competitors are a step down in storm worthiness from the abovementioned models. All of these models are worthy of being taken to big remote ranges like the Alaska Range or the Himalayas.

If you're looking for a Denali stormworthy model or something equivalent, we recommend looking at contenders scoring a 9 or a 10 in this metric.

4 season tent - models like this one with a third half-length pole were nice for...
Models like this one with a third half-length pole were nice for creating headroom but were not nearly as good in high winds. We found these types of tents great for summer mountaineering but not as good for multi-day ski tours or expedition use in extreme conditions. Peter Webb getting ready to pack up with The North Face Assault.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Tents like The North Face Assault, Black Diamond Hilight, and Black Diamond Ahwahnee are not as sturdy, despite having 2.5 poles. The 0.5 pole is a half-length pole that creates more headroom but doesn't add strength. At times, the awning created by this third pole can act as a sail and further stress the poles. These models offer respectably strong 4 season shelter but aren't a model we'd take to Denali or any place we'd expect fierce winds.

4 season tent - weight is an important consideration since it often lives on our...
Weight is an important consideration since it often lives on our backs during the day. With most options, it's a weight and packed size vs. livability trade-off. The shorter the trip, the more we'd lean towards going lighter and more compressible. The longer the trip, we'd opt for tents with more floor space and features, aiming to make them more versatile and comfortable. Our experts are testing on the Forbidden Glacier after nearly 6,000ft of elevation gain and a couple of rappels. Lighter models excel on outings like this, and offer a significant advantage.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Weight and Packed Size


We rank each 4 season tent based on its weight (which we measured ourselves) and packed volume. We measured both the minimum weight and "packed weight" for comparison and used these measurements to compare each model accurately. The minimum weight is the tent, fly, and poles; no guy lines, no pole sack, no sacks, etc. The measured weight is the weight of each tent where it is usable, which is generally everything included in the minimum weight, plus guy lines, a pole bag, and an appropriate number of stakes. The measured weight is the primary number we used for our comparison.


A tent is where you stand to save the most weight among a single piece of equipment. The tents we tested have a huge weight range from just under 3 pounds to nearly 9 pounds!

4 season tent - the black diamond firstlight is one of the absolute lightest tents...
The Black Diamond Firstlight is one of the absolute lightest tents we tested. While it scored low for comfort and stormworthiness there is something to be said about a 4 season tent that is as light and small as this one. Here the Firstlight stands below the Price Glacier on Mt. Shuksan a classic carry-over-style alpine route.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

The Lightest of the light

The Black Diamond Firstlight is the lightest tent tested at 2.8 pounds. The MSR Advance Pro 2 is the next lightest model and offers the lowest weight among waterproof models at 2.9 pounds. However, to achieve this low weight, there is no bug mesh (a deal breaker if camping below treeline). It also has the smallest interior space and the least breathable fabric. The Mountain Hardwear AC2 (3.4 lbs) is the lightest model, which is waterproof AND offers a bug mesh door. The North Face Assault 2 weighs a little more (excluding its removable hooped vestibule) and offers more venting options.

4 season tent - at just a hair over four pounds for its true packed weight, the...
At just a hair over four pounds for its true packed weight, the Access 2 impressed us as one of the lightest double-wall models we tested. While light, it doesn't give up anything for its versatility and compresses smaller than a number of single-wall options.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Light with a little more versatility

We loved the Black Diamond Eldorado, MSR Access 2, and the Mountain Hardwear Outpost 2. They weigh between 4 and 5 pounds and are significantly more versatile and comfortable than tents that weigh a pound or two less. For most people, these hit a sweet spot of weight, comfort, strength, and livability.

4 season tent
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Bivy-style tents are ideal for short trips in nice weather. However, if you are only going to own one tent, get something just a little heavier (often only 8-16 ounces more) that provides significantly greater ventilation, comfort, and strength.

4 season tent - tent manufacturers often claim several different weights. this can...
Tent manufacturers often claim several different weights. This can be confusing to the consumer, so let us try to break it down. When manufacturers are stating minimum weight, they mean just that - literally just the tent and poles, no stakes, guylines, etc. When they just say weight, they basically refer to the weight of the package, including guy lines or the tent stuff sack. We compared models with their pack weight or what you'd commonly bring, which includes guy lines and a handful of stakes, plus the tent but not the tent's stuff sack.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

While there is no shortage of carry-over routes in North America, most people aren't bringing the tent up and onto the route on a regular basis. That is why we generally recommend a more all-around tent for general use and then a sil-nylon tarp or bivy sack for the rare (for most people) carry-over route (where you need to carry your tent with you while climbing).

4 season tent - it&#039;s important to take into account your needs and what you plan to...
It's important to take into account your needs and what you plan to do with your product. With so many options available, it can be overwhelming at first. But read on to help pick which option is best for you. Here Ian Nicholson and the Eldorado are camped below Forbidden Peak.
Credit: Jason Broman

Packed Volume


Comparing models side by side, some models take up as little as one-quarter the space of the bulkiest options. That said, keep in mind that a little more bulk can provide a lot more versatility and strength.

One of the most compact models we tested was the Black Diamond Firstlight and the Black Diamond Hilight. No other disappeared as easily in our pack as these two. Options like the TNF Assault FUTURELIGHT and Mountain Hardwear AC2 were still tiny and still compressed down nearly to the size of a Nalgene bottle but not quite as small as the first two listed models.

The MSR Access 2, Mountain Hardwear Outpost 2, REI Arete ASL 2, and Black Diamond Eldorado were the next most packable models, which were as much as 40-50% bigger than the smallest models but provided more comfort and versatility. Comparably the least packable models, The North Face Mountain 25 and Mountain Hardwear Trango 2, offer more interior space and greater strength but were roughly 2-3 times the size of all the models mentioned above.

Most people would obviously prefer a more compact model over a larger one. The exception is the expedition environment, where extra bulk is often 100% worth it for added comfort and strength. A shelter is one of your most important lifelines if you are on a remote glacier being pounded by driving wind and snow. Keep that in mind when judging a tent's packed size.

4 season tent - the eldorado, pictured here on mt. shuksan, is one of the more...
The Eldorado, pictured here on Mt. Shuksan, is one of the more durable products out there. Tester Ian Nicholson has used his well over 200 days. While it isn't the most packable nor the lightest, it is lighter and smaller than most models we tested and is bomber and surprisingly pleasant to hang out in. Camped out below the Sulphide Glacier, Mt. Shuksan, North Cascades, WA.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

The Size of a Tent's Footprint


A tent's footprint is the total amount of real estate it takes up, which is not to be confused with the smaller footprint "tarp" that protects only the floor of your tent. Footprint is especially important if you are perched on ledges, rocky moraines, or nestled between boulders. These conditions are common in the Cascades, Tetons, Colorado Rockies, Wind Rivers, or Sierra.

4 season tent - a small footprint isn&#039;t just for tiny ledges mid-route (though it is...
A small footprint isn't just for tiny ledges mid-route (though it is nice for that too); it also comes in handy for a lot of summertime, alpine climbing where big flat areas are generally hard to come by. Smaller dimensions let you take advantage of more places on rocky outcroppings or between boulders as seen here with The North Face Assault.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Livability


We assess how pleasant (or, in some cases, tolerable) it was to spend time in each tent. We looked at interior space, headroom, door and vestibule design, zipper quality, the number of pockets, peak height, and vestibule space. Then we assessed the overall vibe of how pleasant it was to share each model with another person. Was it dark and gloomy or bright and cheerful?


Did the tent get wet when someone entered in the rain? Do the pockets hold what you want them to hold? Are two people cramped? How well do two full-sized pads fit? Can you sit up, face your partner, and play cards?

A key "livability" spec is the number of square feet of interior space. These tents ranged from 24-40 square feet. Most averaged around 30 square feet. As a reference, the average sleeping pad is 20 x 72 inches or 10 square feet. Tents that are 24-27 square feet feel a little tight as two full-length pads barely fit. Tents with 28-34 square feet feel comfortable for most people, and 35-40 square foot tents feel spacious and could borderline fit an average-sized third person.

4 season tent - how much liveability and floor space you want depends on the types...
How much liveability and floor space you want depends on the types of trips you'll be going on. For shorter trips, during times of generally stable weather, we prefer a lighter and smaller tent. Hopefully, we won't be hanging out in it much and it's lighter and more compact in our packs.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

The most livable tents were the Black Diamond Ahwahnee, with its two HUGE doors and higher-than-average headroom, along with the Mountain Hardwear Trango 2, The North Face Mountain 25, and Black Diamond Fitzroy. All of these offered 2-doors, pleasant interior height, and a fair amount of square footage.

4 season tent - double wall tents tend to be a lot more versatile and comfortable...
Double wall tents tend to be a lot more versatile and comfortable, making them right at home on expeditions where a little extra weight and packed volume are easily worth the extra strength.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

If you are looking for a nice blend of weight/packed size and livability, then the Mountain Hardwear Outpost, and REI Arete ASL 2 were our favorites. The MSR Access 2 and Black Diamond Eldorado are right behind. While none of the "bivy-style tents" were truly comfortable compared to the models listed above, The North Face Assualt, with all its venting options, vaulted ceiling, and vestibule option, was livable given its weight.

4 season tent - hooped vestibules unquestionably add to a given model&#039;s livability...
Hooped vestibules unquestionably add to a given model's livability. Besides making the tent "feel bigger" they provide a place to leave wet gear, change before entering the tent, and allow you to leave doors completely open to maximize interior ventilation. While unnecessary for short trips with good weather, vestibules are 100% worth their weight for extended or stormy adventures. The Vestibule of a MSR Remote 2 shown here.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Ease of Set Up


To look at the ease of setup, we look at whether or not the tent uses pole clips, sleeves, or internal poles. We also evaluate the time for set up and how easy each is to set up in poor conditions.


Pole Clips


Pole clips are the quickest and easiest way to set up a tent. On double-wall tents, they let moisture move and prevent condensation. The disadvantage of clips is that they are heavier and don't spread the force of wind or snow as evenly along the pole's length compared with pole sleeves.

4 season tent - pole clips have the advantage of ease and speed but also help...
Pole clips have the advantage of ease and speed but also help protect the poles while pitching it in windy conditions. This is because you can clip the tent from the bottom up versus threading the pole through a sleeve, where it can act as a sail. This is the time your pole is at the most risk of breaking.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Pole Sleeves


Pole sleeves are more supportive than clips, as they spread the weight evenly across a wider area. However, they are challenging to use when it's windy. In a gust, the tent acts like a kite until setup is complete. Clips are slightly faster to set up.

4 season tent - some models use a hybrid of pole sleeves and clips, like the rei...
Some models use a hybrid of pole sleeves and clips, like the REI Arete ASL 2 (seen here). This combination gets some of the benefits of both clips (ease of set-up) and sleeves (strength).
Credit: Ian Nicholson

4 season tent
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Internal Poles


Lighter-weight tents use internal poles, and you typically have to set them up from the inside. This is the lightest design because the tent's body supports the poles, and no real clips or sleeves are needed. Some designs use small pieces of velcro or twist-tie features to keep the poles in place. The weight shavings from forgoing clips and extra materials mean that internal pole tents are often lighter.

4 season tent - some models use a hybrid of pole sleeves and clips, like the rei...
Some models use a hybrid of pole sleeves and clips, like the REI Arete ASL 2 (seen here). This combination gets some of the benefits of both clips (ease of set-up) and sleeves (strength)
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Internal pole design is as strong or even stronger than models that use sleeves with a similar pole structure. The primary disadvantage is that internal pole setups are the most challenging and time-consuming to pitch. If it's windy, it's an even bigger pain. You have to crawl inside to set up. Examples are the North Face Assault, Eldorado, and Black Diamond Fitzroy.

4 season tent - the latest version of the assault pitches from the inside. while...
The latest version of the Assault pitches from the inside. While this has some advantages such as greater strength (once pitched) and lower weight, as there are no full-length sleeves or plastic clips; it does take more practice and care to pitch especially in stormier conditions.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

The models above have a very tight pitch, which makes them incredibly strong for their weight; they also have the biggest learning curve to pitch efficiently while avoiding stabbing a hole through the floor. The learning curve is hardly extreme, but it is worth setting up in a park or backyard a few times before dealing with it on a trip. A tip from Tester Ian Nicholson: stand and start from the back corners, working towards the door.

4 season tent - pole clips are much faster and easier to set up than sleeves and...
Pole clips are much faster and easier to set up than sleeves and while they don't support the pole quite as well, this is a much more subtle difference.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

4 season tent - using a four-season tent for family or warmer weather three season...
Using a four-season tent for family or warmer weather three season camping can be less than ideal. This depends on how adaptive your tent is, which can range from uncomfortable to rather pleasant. Here tester Ian Nicholson takes a collection of four season tents on a wet low elevation family camping trip.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

MSR Advance Pro and Mountain Hardwear AC2 use sleeves with closed ends on one end. You don't have to snap the first side of the pole into a grommet, and it automatically locks into place. This was much easier than single-wall tents that pitch from the inside.

Among double-wall models, the Hilleberg models were BY FAR the easiest to pitch. Unlike most double-wall tents, where you pitch the body with the poles and then throw the fly over the top of everything, the Hilleberg models are suspended from the fly, and you erect the entire thing from the outside. This minimizes the amount of time your tent could become damaged by the wind or filled with snow. For more traditional double-wall designs, we found the REI Arete was easier and faster than others.

4 season tent - the jannu&#039;s three different vestibule configurations are shown here...
The Jannu's three different vestibule configurations are shown here. The middle is our lead tester's preferred option because it is easier to enter and exit. You can also roll the vestibule away completely, not shown.
Credit: Max Neale

4 season tent - the jannu&#039;s pole structure is easy to set up, even with one person...
The Jannu's pole structure is easy to set up, even with one person in high winds (while wearing gloves). After staking the base of the tent out, the poles insert into partial pole sleeves (shown here), that stand up by themselves.
Credit: Max Neale

Adaptability and Versatility


A tent's versatility refers to its performance across various conditions and climates. All 4 season tent options are designed with snowy and windy conditions in mind. We compared them across the spectrum of common uses, such as alpine climbing, bivy tent climbing, snow camping, multi-day ski-touring, and expedition climbing. We also compared how well each model performed in the rain, warmer three-season travel, and desert climates.


More versatile tents are generally a better value. As a whole, most double-wall tents scored better than single-wall tents because they handled warmer conditions with and without moisture. The Mountain 25, Trango 2, REI Arete ASL 2, and Outpost 2 also fared well and would be good options for sea-kayaking and both three and four-season use.

4 season tent - versatility is important for those who don&#039;t want to buy a quiver of...
Versatility is important for those who don't want to buy a quiver of tents. It's hard to get a tent that's perfect for everything but some are certainly more versatile than others. Pictured here is The North Face Mountain 25 that has been used for extended expeditions on three continents, as well as summer alpine climbing in the North Cascades. Here we used it for a week-long sea kayaking trip on Vancouver Island's West Coast in the Broken Islands. It is worth noting that because of exposure to higher winds and with weight and bulk being slightly less of an issue, many sea kayakers may choose a three or four season tent.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

A tent scored higher in this category when it had features that allowed us to use it differently. For example, a removable inner tent, which allows you to use and pitch your tent in different ways. We also loved models like The North Face Assault, which came with removable vestibules, adding to its versatility and adaptability. You can buy a vestibule for all of Black Diamond's single-wall models, but they are sold separately.

4 season tent - the access 2 is one of our go-to choices for multi-season camping.
The Access 2 is one of our go-to choices for multi-season camping.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

All Hilleberg tents have removable inner tents that give you a lighter floorless shelter for summer backpacking and fast and light winter trips. The floorless option is excellent for mountaineering because you can dig into the snow to create a cooking area.

4 season tent - inside the hilleberg nammatj 2 without the inner tent. going...
Inside the Hilleberg Nammatj 2 without the inner tent. Going floorless saves 30.9 oz. for three-season backpacking or fast and light winter travel. The walls seal fairly well with the ground and even minimizes the number of flying insects from entering. Setting up with only the fly and poles is possible with nearly all Hilleberg designs.
Credit: Max Neale

Among single-wall tents, no tent comes close to matching the versatility of the Black Diamond Ahwahnee. It offers two gigantic doors, which we left open to create unparalleled ventilation and a roomy feel. This is one of the few single wall tents you could use strictly as a 3-season backpacking tent but still strong enough for modest 4-season conditions. Since many people looking for a 4-season tent end up camping a good portion of the time in 3-season conditions (often while approaching the route or simply camping above treeline on warm summer days), the Black Diamond Ahwahnee is truly tough to beat.

Ventilation


Ventilation can have a dramatic influence on a tent's adaptability and livability. Double-wall tents often have better air circulation and less condensation than single-wall options. The Hilleberg models and The North Face Mountain 25 have some of the best ventilation and moisture management of all double-wall tents. The top vents on dome tents are useful in moving air around and mitigating the "it's snowing inside" effect when moisture vapor from your breath freezes, hits the roof and falls back on you.

Of the single wall tents, The North Face Assault sported the most impressive ventilation system. It has four total vents, with a vent on the front door, one on each side, and a door/window/escape hatch allowing ventilation and air circulation. The hatch also allows for improved safety while cooking.

4 season tent - the north face assault sported one of the most impressive...
The North Face Assault sported one of the most impressive ventilation systems for a bivy-tent.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Bug Screen


Unlike most 3 season models, not all 4 season tents have a bug screen. A bug screen is essential if you are not on an expedition-style climb. It lets you leave the door open for ventilation and defends against mosquitos or black flies. This is particularly true for climbers or ski tours who are likely to have a few lower elevation camps below the treeline where it's buggy.

4 season tent - having a door you can leave open for ventilation is ideal...
Having a door you can leave open for ventilation is ideal, especially if it features a bug screen; a bug screen is more than worth its weight and could be a pivotal factor when finalizing your decision between models.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Durability


Durability is set by the type of fabric used for the fly, the quality of the poles, and the floor. If pitching on snow, the floor will matter less. Silnylon is the fabric of choice for double-wall tents. Most PU formulations used on fly fabric coatings are more prone to hydrolysis (chemical breakup) than sil-nylon. They can wear out faster, particularly in wet environments, and aren't as resistant to UV degradation.


The Hilleberg Nammatj, with three layers of silicone on each side, may last twice as long as the competition.

4 season tent - testing durability onsite and comparatively while playing in snowy...
Testing durability onsite and comparatively while playing in snowy conditions.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Tent floors have high-grade PU formulations that resist hydrolysis. The majority of the double-wall tents tested have a tough 70 denier floor. Some Hilleberg tents, like the Nammatj and Tarra, use a 100 denier fabric that is burly. Single-wall tents often use lighter floor materials.

Specific features can also have a significant impact on durability. The big three here are zippers, clips, and webbing adjustments. More prominent zippers last longer and can handle expeditions because they continue to work with dust and grit. The most durable double-wall tent we tested is the Hilleberg Jannu, which features mega high-quality poles; they also have the nicest fabric among other contenders in our review.

4 season tent - we tested our favorite four season tents in a variety of locations...
We tested our favorite four season tents in a variety of locations, from expedition climbing in the Alaska Range and the Andes to summer alpine climbing in the Cascades, Sierra, and Tetons. We also went on multi-day ski tours and took them winter camping. Here we test while camped at White Rocks Lake on Day 3 of a six-day journey across the North Cascades' Ptarmigan Traverse, with Spire Point and the Elephant's head looming above the Dana Glacier.
Credit: Ian Nicholson

Conclusion


We understand that the 4-season tent market is vast, and the investment is large. We hope that our experiences of exploring, sleeping, and living in each tent helps you find the best tent for your adventure.

Ian Nicholson


You Might Also Like

Ad-free. Influence-free. Powered by Testing.

GearLab is founded on the principle of honest, objective, reviews. Our experts test thousands of products each year using thoughtful test plans that bring out key performance differences between competing products. And, to assure complete independence, we buy all the products we test ourselves. No cherry-picked units sent by manufacturers. No sponsored content. No ads. Just real, honest, side-by-side testing and comparison.

Learn More