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Best Climbing Shoes for Women of 2021

We tested women's climbing shoes from La Sportiva, Five Ten, Scarpa, and others to find the best-performing models for your climbing style
Photo: Eric Bissell
By Jane Jackson ⋅ Senior Review Editor
Thursday November 4, 2021
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Over the past decade, our team has tested over 45 of the best women's climbing shoes, recently purchasing 19 of today's best models for our latest round of side-by-side testing. We've put in a significant amount of time and effort scanning online retailers and perusing local gear shops in order to bring the best products to you. Hundreds of pitches and boulder problems have been climbed to get the most accurate results. We've climbed cracks, pulled on pockets, fallen off our projects, and tip-toed up delicate slabs all in the name of testing. From circuits in the gym to the sweeping walls of the Verdon Gorge, we have put in the time to help you find the right pair of climbing shoes.

Top 19 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 19
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Awards Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  Top Pick Award Top Pick Award 
Price $185.00 at REI
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$170.00 at REI
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$148.00 at Backcountry
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$185.00 at Backcountry
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$146.20 at Amazon
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Overall Score Sort Icon
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79
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Pros Great edging shoe, precise, versatileComfortable, high performance, sticky rubber, easy to put on, good in cracks, versatileComfortable, extremely sensitive, great for smearing and steep climbing, easy to get on and offSuper sensitive, overall comfortable for aggressive design, great for pocket climbing, good for heel hookingSuper comfortable, medium stiffness provides versatility, very adjustable
Cons Specific shape can cause discomfort for some, expensiveStretch out quickly, costly, lack supportExpensive, No-Edge technology could be an acquired tasteExpensive, specific, can be painful for someExpensive, not great for sport climbing or bouldering
Bottom Line A technical climbing powerhouse, perfect for crimpy limestone lines or long granite free climbsThe Skwama are impressive in many realms, combining comfort with a high performance fitIf you let them, they may revolutionize your footwork; they'll take some getting used to, but are top notch for steep climbingThis model gets our Top Pick for steep climbing and bouldering due to their aggressive shape, precision, and comfortable designImpressive performance on cracks, edges, and slabs plus an all-day comfortable fit makes these shoes a great choice for trad climbing enthusiasts
Rating Categories La Sportiva Miura VS La Sportiva Skwama... La Sportiva Futura... La Sportiva Solutio... Scarpa Maestro Mid Eco
Comfort (25%)
8.0
9.0
9.0
8.0
9.0
Sensitivity (25%)
9.0
9.0
10.0
9.0
8.0
Edging (15%)
10.0
7.0
7.0
5.0
8.0
Cracks (15%)
8.0
9.0
5.0
7.0
9.0
Pockets (15%)
9.0
8.0
10.0
10.0
5.0
Ease Of Use (5%)
7.0
9.0
9.0
8.0
7.0
Specs La Sportiva Miura VS La Sportiva Skwama... La Sportiva Futura... La Sportiva Solutio... Scarpa Maestro Mid Eco
Style Velcro Velcro Velcro Velcro Lace
Weight (Per Pair, size 37) 0.94 lb 1.00 lb 0.91 lb 0.95 lb 1.17 lb
Width Options Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular
Fit High Asymmetry Asymmetrical High Asymmetry Asymmetrical Medium-Low Asymetry
Upper Leather Leather/Microfiber Leather/ Synthetic Leather/microfiber Eco leather
Lining Dentex Unlined Unlined Lycra tongue/ unlined Unlined
Sole Rubber Vibram XS Grip2 Vibram XS Grip2 Vibram XS Grip2 Vibram XS Grip2 Vibram XS Edge


Best Overall Women's Climbing Shoes


La Sportiva Miura VS - Women's


87
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 8
  • Sensitivity 9
  • Edging 10
  • Cracks 8
  • Pockets 9
  • Ease of Use 7
Style: Velcro | Sole rubber: Vibram XS Grip2
High performing all-around shoe
Great for edging
Performs well on slabby, vertical, and overhanging routes
Very adjustable
Provides arch support for longer days
Expensive
Aggressive shape can cause discomfort

The La Sportiva Miura VS is a classic shoe that is ubiquitous in most climbing areas around the world. Some women climb long backcountry big walls in the Miura VS, while others swear by them for steep sport lines. With its range of applications, high scores across the board, and loyal following, the Miura VS is an obvious choice for overall favorite.

These shoes are some of the most sensitive edging machines we've tested. Their slight downturn makes them great for steep climbing, but they have a stiff enough midsole to beat some of the top performers on vertical terrain as well. Their three Velcro straps allow for easy adjustments, and they fit a wide range of foot shapes. Size them with a bit of extra room, and they can be great for all-day comfort on hard free routes. Size them tighter, and they're the perfect shoe for your steep sport project. All-around performance is the name of the game here.

Read review: La Sportiva Miura VS — Women's

Best Bang for the Buck


Five Ten Kirigami - Women's


67
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 9
  • Sensitivity 7
  • Edging 4
  • Cracks 7
  • Pockets 4
  • Ease of Use 9
Style: Velcro | Sole rubber: C4 Stealth Rubber
Great price
Extremely comfortable
Sticky soles
Easy to get on and off
Not ideal for edging or technical terrain
Not stiff

The Five Ten Kirigami - Women's is seriously one of the most comfortable shoes we've ever worn — and we've worn a LOT of different climbing shoes over the years. On the first day wearing these shoes outdoors, we put them on for a pitch of climbing and then left them on while belaying — something our lead tester would never normally do. The Kirigamis were arguably more comfortable than our approach shoes. Point being, these Velcro slippers are ideal for beginner climbers and those concerned with comfort above all else. They are still well made and provide a solid foundation for a wide variety of climbing. We felt they were best suited for moderate multi-pitch climbing, especially crack climbs. Comfort and performance in a reasonably priced package — what's not to like?

These shoes performed okay across the board in our metric comparisons. Though not designed for performance rock climbing, we tested them on small edges and smears to see how they worked. In general, the Kirigami did pretty well except for the fact that the soles are very floppy, meaning these shoes completely lack the stiffness of many of our top performers in edging.

Read review: Five Ten Kirigami - Women's

Great Value for Beginners


La Sportiva Tarantulace - Women's


64
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 9
  • Sensitivity 4
  • Edging 7
  • Cracks 7
  • Pockets 4
  • Ease of Use 8
Style: Lace | Sole rubber: Frixion RS
Affordable
Design is focused on comfort
Easy to lace and adjust
Decent all-arounder
Not the stickiest rubber we've tested
Lacks sensitivity

The La Sportiva Tarantulace - Women's is our top recommendation for new climbers who are ready to commit to buying their own pair of shoes. The Tarantulace is first and foremost comfortable - their soft leather uppers will stretch with wear. The shoes are not aggressively shaped like our value recommendation, so they work great for all-day multi-pitch climbs or long gym sessions. They do have a slight downturn which helps them excel as an edging shoe. We found them to work best on vertical terrain with decently sized footholds.

Once the angle gets steeper, or the holds become more like smears, the Tarantualces start to become a bit more challenging to trust. The rubber compound is not the stickiest we've tested, and the stiffness of the sole makes them a bit hard to smear with, especially on footless granite slabs. This aside, the Tarantulaces are still great shoes for most introductory climbing.

Read review: La Sportiva Tarantulace - Women's

Best for Steep Climbing and Bouldering


La Sportiva Solution Comp - Women's


80
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 8
  • Sensitivity 9
  • Edging 5
  • Cracks 7
  • Pockets 10
  • Ease of Use 8
Style: Velco | Sole rubber: Vibram XS Grip
Aggressive, asymmetrical shape
Precise toe box
Slipper design combines comfort and performance
Great heel cup
Super sensitive in both toe and heel
Expensive
Specific design lacks versatility

Much like their close relative, the Solution, the brand new La Sportiva Solution Comp is most at home on steep sport climbs and boulders. The Solution Comp is a lot like the Solution in terms of design and performance, only better, making this slick slipper a great choice for sport climbing and bouldering. The updated toe box is a bit wider and has more rubber on top for toe hooking and scumming. This design also provides more room for the toes, making the Comp very comfortable. Additionally, the Solution Comp's heel cup is lower profile and more sensitive than the original Solution. Like a well-fitting glove, the Solution Comp suctions onto your foot to turn it into a high-performance, precise talon — ideal for toeing in on steep terrain. These slipper-like shoes combine comfort and performance so well that only the original Solution and the La Sportiva Futura came close in comparison. We wore these shoes on everything from granite slabs to steep sport climbs to highball boulder problems.

For some, the slipper-like fit and soft midsole may be too much. The shape is an acquired taste and can cause some discomfort at first. These shoes are designed for high-performance rock climbing, and the lack of versatility can be a bit limiting. Keep that in mind when considering the Solution Comp.

Read review: La Sportiva Solution Comp - Women's

Best for Versatility


La Sportiva Skwama - Women's


86
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 9
  • Sensitivity 9
  • Edging 7
  • Cracks 9
  • Pockets 8
  • Ease of Use 9
Style: Velcro | Sole rubber: Vibram XS Grip2
Precise
Comfortable
Perform well on both steep and vertical terrain
Sticky soles
Expensive
Stretch out with use

The incredibly comfortable La Sportiva Skwama is one of our favorite shoes and our go-to for most of our projects, from steep, overhanging pocketed lines to technical, crimpy faces. The Skwama is confidence-inspiring on the smallest smears and the greasiest limestone footholds. We've climbed in these shoes on technical sandstone boulders in Fontainbleau and on steep tufa lines in Southern France. We also wear the Skwama bouldering in the Buttermilks and in Yosemite. It's an incredibly versatile shoe, and we almost always throw the Skwama in our bag, no matter where we're headed.

The Skwama is a great all-around shoe with few performance weaknesses. However, take note that the material stretches out quickly, which is a bit disappointing for such a pricey shoe. Still, we love this shoe and are thrilled to have the Skwama accompany us on all our climbing adventures.

Read review: La Sportiva Skwama — Women's

Best for Multi-Pitch and Crack Climbing


Scarpa Maestro Mid Eco - Women's


79
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 9
  • Sensitivity 8
  • Edging 8
  • Cracks 9
  • Pockets 5
  • Ease of Use 7
Style: Lace | Sole rubber: Vibram XS Edge
Laces make them highly adjustable
Stiff midsole, but soft enough to wedge into cracks
Soft, comfortable leather uppers
Great edging shoe
Expensive
Laces and leather uppers could have durability issues

The Scarpa Maestro Mid Eco is one of the softest, most comfortable shoes we've ever worn. The laces make these shoes super easy to adjust — cinch them down when it's time to take the sharp end on the crux pitch or loosen them up to accommodate socks on a crisp alpine start. A medium-stiff midsole makes these shoes versatile — they can hold an edge to cop a stem rest but are soft enough to squish into a .75 crack when necessary. The Maestro can smear up a stout 5.9 slab with ease and can provide ankle protection on a desert offwidth grovel fest.

Our only real gripe with the Maestro is its exorbitant price tag. These are expensive, and for a seemingly delicate shoe that's bound to get beat up in wide cracks and long days on the wall, it can be hard to wrap one's head around paying so much. Durability could be an issue if you tend to be hard on your shoes. Regardless, we loved the Maestro for crack and multi-pitch climbing.

Read review: Scarpa Maestro Mid Eco — Women's

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
87
$185
Editors' Choice Award
For climbing where footwork is key, look no further than the Miura VS
86
$170
Top Pick Award
These high performance slippers from La Sportiva work well in almost all arenas, from cracks to steep sport climbs
85
$185
From tufas to granite boulders, these are a steep climbers dream
80
$185
Top Pick Award
From toeing in on steep terrain to standing on small holds to heel hooking, this shoe does it all
79
$189
Top Pick Award
The combination of features and comfort make the Maestro a crack climbing, multi-pitch machine
79
$180
For steep terrain where an aggressive shape and an asymmetrical toe box are your friend, go for the Solution
76
$165
This shoe will give you confidence on the smallest of holds and the thinnest of cracks
75
$140
The Up Lace shines in the multi-pitch trad realm - comfort, stiffness, and crack climbing abilities are the name of the game
74
$179
Though not our least favorite shoe in the pack, they are certainly not the highest performing model we tested
72
$189
These shoes are great for vertical to steep sport climbing and bouldering
71
$200
For toe hooks, heel hooks, and other steep-climbing shenanigans, these are the ticket
71
$165
This downturned, stiff shoe is both sensitive and aggressive for toeing in to small holds on steep walls
70
$160
This soft slipper makes for a comfortable and precise shoe for the intermediate climber
69
$170
While they did moderately well in overall performance, this model is impressive because of its comfortable design
67
$155
The Gomi is designed to scum, hook, and smear onto all matter of footholds found in the steeps
67
$90
Best Buy Award
An ideal shoe for a beginner climber - these are soft, comfortable, and great for moderate terrain
64
$85
Best Buy Award
A shoe that is great for all-day wear and is easy to take on and off
52
$140
This shoe is incredibly stiff and runs small, making it challenging to break-in
51
$180
The Focus has a stiff midsole that helps you stand on edges, but lacks sensitivity

Off the deck, the Anasazi was a bit soft, but performed good enough...
Off the deck, the Anasazi was a bit soft, but performed good enough on the giant holds found in the Tablelands.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Why You Should Trust Us


Our testers spend more time climbing than they probably ought to. Our lead tester Jane Jackson spends a lot of her time climbing in Yosemite and the High Sierra. Previously a member of Yosemite Search and Rescue, Jane has done her fair share of big wall climbing in Valley. That said, in recent years, she prefers free climbing, which allows her to put the many aggressive and colorful shoes in this review to the test. From the sweeping and imposing limestone walls of France's Verdon Gorge to the perfectly parallel cracks found in the desert Southwest closer to home, and finally (and somewhat begrudgingly) to the hallowed boulders of the Buttermilks, our testers have put these shoes through a smattering of different climbing styles. In each of these storied locales, we painstakingly broke in each shoe reviewed here and tested them out in various climbing styles. While a jack of all trades may be a master of none, we can at least make well-founded judgments on the performance of each of these shoes in a wide range of climbing styles.

Our lead tester in the Utah Hills near St. George, Utah.
Our lead tester in the Utah Hills near St. George, Utah.
Photo: Eric Bissell

What Makes Climbing Shoes Women's Specific?


What is the difference between a woman's climbing shoe and a man's? What are the advantages of a woman's shoe? Are women limited to just the "women's" models? The answer to that question is: absolutely not! Women's specific shoes are relatively new to the market, and before that, ladies had to go with men's or unisex models. There are still many shoes in production that only come in a unisex model, and they are fair game, as are the products with the women's specific label.

Related: Best Climbing Shoes for Men of 2021

Aside from the superficial (like color schemes), the defining difference between men's and women's shoes is that they are usually constructed around different lasts (the form matching the foot's anatomy off which a shoe is patterned). The female last will be similar to that of the male version but usually a little narrower, especially in the heel. Other differences may include a higher arch, a thinner and longer toe box, and a lower instep. These changes in last dimensions can enhance the fit for many women, particularly those who have low-volume or very narrow feet.

Booting up for another pitch in Southern France.
Booting up for another pitch in Southern France.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Analysis and Test Results


Each time we revamp our women's climbing shoe review, we see more choices available; in fact, the past couple of years have been marked by an increase in the number of women's specific shoes produced by manufacturers. If you have a narrow and/or low-volume foot, this is great news! There are tons of choices out there from all the familiar brands that are catering to women specifically. That said, unisex climbing shoes are designed to be just that — unisex. So, don't feel like you are limited solely to women's specific shoes.

An array of women&#039;s climbing shoes - most brands make women&#039;s...
An array of women's climbing shoes - most brands make women's specific models, but don't be afraid to try out a unisex version! Our lead tester has wide feet and often prefers the men's version of many popular shoes on the market.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Despite the regular additions to the women's specific shoe market, there are still gaps in coverage, though progress is being made. However, this review is the first time we were able to exclusively compare women's specific models. Finally, there are enough options available to conduct an extensive, side-by-side analysis.

A shoe for every style. Once you get into climbing, it can be hard...
A shoe for every style. Once you get into climbing, it can be hard to choose one pair that suits every type of climbing.
Photo: Eric Bissell

It should be noted that we have shoes designed for a variety of different climbing disciplines, and they've been combined into this one review. This predicament creates problems when trying to perform a comparative analysis. To address this issue, we have highlighted the differences between the various models and highlighted which models are most comparable. If you are looking for a specific style, you can quickly narrow your search.

Camp 4 provides a great testing ground. There may not be slicker...
Camp 4 provides a great testing ground. There may not be slicker footholds on earth.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Value


The price of climbing shoes seems to be increasing each year. Preparing to throw down as much as a few Benjamins for a new pair of shoes, of which the performance and lasting fit are yet unknown, can make the selection process a bit overwhelming. At these prices, we want to make sure that we are getting the right tool for the job! The most expensive shoes in this review are the Scarpa Furia. Both the La Sportiva Solution and the La Sportiva Solution Comp are close behind. These shoes are designed for a particular use (steep face climbs) and are typically purchased by experienced climbers who want to up their technical climbing game. The Scarpa Maestro Mid Eco is a bit more versatile and comfortable, but still costs a pretty penny.

A well-loved, much worn pair of Skwamas that look like they&#039;ve...
A well-loved, much worn pair of Skwamas that look like they've almost reached retirement, based on the amount of rubber left on the toe.
Photo: Jane Jackson

For more reasonably priced shoes, look at brands like Butora and Mad Rock, who make high-quality products at lower prices. The Five Ten Kirigami impressed us in both comfort and price, with great performance in most of our testing metrics as well. The Evolv Shakra is a comparable, reasonably priced introductory shoe. We were also impressed by the Butora Gomi, which is a high-performance shoe comparable to the Solution, with a more affordable price tag. La Sportiva also has a few reasonably priced models - most notably the Tarantulace - Women's, which earned honors for its exceptional value. These shoes are some of the few available that cost under a hundred dollars.

There is a wide price range within the climbing shoe world. It may take some time to figure out which model has the features you need with a price tag you can manage. However, when the toes are wearing thin on your current shoes, buying a new shoe isn't your only option. You can always save some cash by purchasing from a used gear shop or sending your old standbys to a re-sole company to extend their life. These are great options when the anxiety of spending a lot of money on a new pair of kicks washes over you!


Comfort


Evaluating the comfort of a climbing shoe is difficult, and many folks have different ideas of what makes a comfortable shoe. Climbing shoes, in general, are going to be less comfortable than shoes worn around town. Some people size their shoes small to get the tightest fit possible for maximum performance.


Others will want a shoe whose fit feels similar to that of a street shoe for all-day comfort. We based our evaluation on how closely the shoes hugged our feet, how crammed our toes felt, and on the extra features that make a shoe bearable to wear.

Delicate top outs make for great opportunities to test these shoes&#039;...
Delicate top outs make for great opportunities to test these shoes' ability to perform. The Libras surprised us as a great all-around shoe.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Naturally, all the shoes with a flatter shape, like the Five Ten Kirigami and Scarpa Maestro Mid Eco, are more comfortable to wear for extended periods than models with an aggressive downturn. This increased comfort is due to the more natural position in which these shoes hold your feet. The Unparallel Up Lace is also fairly flat and comfortable for all-day outings. We also found that the Evolv Shakra fit comfortably enough to wear them for hours at the gym without taking them off.

The Unparallel Up Lace is comfortable enough to be worn all day.
The Unparallel Up Lace is comfortable enough to be worn all day.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Downturned shoes push your toes into the front of the shoe to amplify their power and allow the climber to toe-in on small holds more aggressively.

The Solution Comp is quite downturned, but super comfortable.
The Solution Comp is quite downturned, but super comfortable.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Surprisingly a few of the most aggressively downturned shoes that we tested, such as the La Sportiva Solution Comp , also turned out to be some of the most comfortable. These shoes don't crush your toes, and they have a sock-like tongue that cradles the foot. Unfortunately, shoes that are both incredibly stiff and downturned, like the Black Diamond Zone, don't cradle the foot at all and can make for a very uncomfortable fit. The La Sportiva Miura VS has bonus comfort features like a padded heel and a padded tongue that tightens the fit for women and makes it very pleasant to wear. Both the Velcro model and the lace-up model have these features. We found the Velcro model to be much more comfortable overall.

All the padding on the Five Ten Kirigami make them an extremely...
All the padding on the Five Ten Kirigami make them an extremely comfortable shoe.
Photo: Jane Jackson

We also noticed that some shoes hug the whole foot, leaving no air pockets or dead space inside. Some shoes with very flat midsoles left pockets of space below the arch of the foot, resulting in a less comfortable fit overall. Surprisingly, the La Sportiva Tarantulace has a fairly flat midsole, yet still seems to hug the sole of the foot comfortably.

A comfortable shoe is crucial for a good warm-up. We always wear a...
A comfortable shoe is crucial for a good warm-up. We always wear a comfortable, slightly bigger pair of shoes when warming up to save our feet from pain!
Photo: Eric Bissell

The La Sportiva Solution Comp and Scarpa Instinct VS both hug the foot entirely with no dead space, and we preferred this close fit. The La Sportiva Skwama also hugs the foot. Its soft sole and sensitivity made it one of our favorites for multi-pitch sport climbing, where both comfort and performance matter.

Toeing in on steep granite in the Shakras.
Toeing in on steep granite in the Shakras.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Sensitivity


One of the reasons that climbers fork over one to two hundred of their hard-earned dollars for climbing shoes versus sneakers or boots is that the prior gives a climber's toes the ability to feel the rock and use minuscule features on the wall.


We find that the more sensitive and precise, the better, because we can trust our feet as we make delicate moves.

The Miura VS is a supremely sensitive shoe.
The Miura VS is a supremely sensitive shoe.
Photo: Eric Bissell

The La Sportiva Miura VS is one of the most sensitive shoes we've reviewed. They're fairly stiff and slightly downturned, but those features didn't detract from its overall sensitivity on all types of terrain. We also appreciated the sensitivity of the Skwama and the Butora Acro, as they gave us the confidence to still trust our feet on the smallest holds out there.

Fresh out of the box, the Miura have a lot of rubber on the soles...
Fresh out of the box, the Miura have a lot of rubber on the soles, which can be a bit unnerving, but, over time these soles wear in to be technical wizards on the rock!
Photo: Eric Bissell

The Black Diamond Zone and Evolv Shakra were some of the least sensitive shoes we tested. The thick rubber on the Zone combined with the stiff, inflexible midsole made it hard to feel any holds beneath our feet. The Shakra did okay in the gym and on less technical climbing but was not the shoe of choice for precision footwork.

The Butora Acro excelled in the sensitivity metric, earning one of...
The Butora Acro excelled in the sensitivity metric, earning one of the highest scores.
Photo: Jane Jackson

This is what it looks like when you climb foot-intensive multi-pitch...
This is what it looks like when you climb foot-intensive multi-pitch routes in shoes not designed for edging...Ouch!
Photo: Eric Bissell

Edging


Edging and sensitivity are similar but apply to different styles of footholds.


Sensitivity allows you to smear on and toe into tiny footholds with confidence. Edging, as we define it, is the ability to place a toe on a small edge and have it feel like a much larger feature. This aspect of climbing shoe performance requires a stiffer sole that is supportive of the whole foot when pressing down on thin edges.

Assessing the edging ability of the Libra on the top out of yet...
Assessing the edging ability of the Libra on the top out of yet another 5-star granite boulder problem.
Photo: Eric Bissell

When it comes to edging, the La Sportiva Miura VS is top-notch. Its stiff midsole and slight downturn help toe in on gently overhanging terrain. At the same time, its shape allows for precision edging on vertical terrain and even slabs. These shoes are edging masters.

Though they are not downturned or aggressively shaped, the Finale...
Though they are not downturned or aggressively shaped, the Finale make a fairly good shoe for vertical to slightly overhung terrain.
Photo: Eric Bissell

The "Powerhinge" connects the rubber rand, which wraps around the whole foot, to a hole cut in the sole on the bottom of the shoe. When the toe is weighted on an edge, the weight of the climber stretches forward from the heel towards the front of the shoe. This hole in the sole only allows the shoe to stretch in the back half, leaving the toe where you placed it on the surface of the rock. The result is that you can stand on edges with your full weight and still feel secure. The lace-up version of the La Sportiva Miura is also impressive as an edging machine. The velcro model is slightly more downturned than its lace-up counterpart, making it great for steep, technical terrain.

A good edging shoe makes the problems on the Camp 4 circuit way...
A good edging shoe makes the problems on the Camp 4 circuit way easier! Stiffness is required to stand on the minuscule footholds found here.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Additionally, the Unparallel Up Lace and the Scarpa Vapor V perform well in the edging category. The Five Ten Kirigami wasn't quite stiff enough to perform well in this metric. The Scarpa Arpia also fell short. Both shoes, though very different in shape and style, were too soft in the midsole, making it hard to hold an edge on vertical terrain.

A bit of stiffness comes in handy when standing on tiny edges in the...
A bit of stiffness comes in handy when standing on tiny edges in the vertical world.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Crack Climbing


As the name implies, the crack climbing metric evaluates how well a shoe will perform when jammed into cracks. Sliding your foot into a crack and twisting to the side so that you can stand up on it is one of the more unique ways to use your feet while climbing. A good crack shoe has a flatter shape that can fit inside a crack without painfully impacting the knuckle of the toes (as opposed to a downturned toe). Additionally, these shoes have a stiff platform that supports the whole foot, and that prevents lateral taco-ing with enough rubber along the side of the shoe to find purchase on the interior and edges of the crack. Ideally, a crack shoe will also be decent at edging and smearing since you will likely need to do all of these things on a traditional climb, even if it's just a single pitch.

Side-by-side testing in Indian Creek - a perfect place for such a...
Side-by-side testing in Indian Creek - a perfect place for such a thing.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Typically, we like to use the La Sportiva TC Pro for crack climbing, though this is not a women's specific shoe. The TC is stiff yet sensitive and can be sized up for a comfortable all-day shoe or sized tight for more technical climbing. When it comes to long days of crack climbing in Yosemite Valley, for example, we typically go with TC Pros instead of one of the women's specific models found in this review.


We were psyched to check out the Scarpa Maestro Mid Eco this season and found that this shoe was as close as we could get to a women's specific version of the TC Pro. With ankle protection, edging abilities, and comfort in cracks, the Maestro was our women's specific go-to for crack climbing.

The Scarpa Maestro&#039;s getting some buttery foot jams on a solo circuit.
The Scarpa Maestro's getting some buttery foot jams on a solo circuit.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Although the Miura VS has some downturn in the toe, there is not enough of a curve to be painful when jammed, and this bit of aggression helps work the toe into difficult, finger-sized cracks.

We can climb splitter cracks like this all day in the Miura VS.
We can climb splitter cracks like this all day in the Miura VS.
Photo: Jane Jackson

Shoes like the La Sportiva Miura and the Unparallel Up Lace are also good lace-up crack climbing shoes. For super continuous cracks at a place like Indian Creek, Utah, the unisex Five Ten Moccasym reigns king. It is a slipper with very sticky rubber and a flat shape. When sized a bit big, it can be comfortable in cracks of any width, and the lack of laces keeps the shoe from shredding.

Some find the toe box to be a bit too asymmetrical on the Miura, but...
Some find the toe box to be a bit too asymmetrical on the Miura, but over time these shoes break in to be great for finger cracks and technical face climbs.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Shoes with a significant amount of downturn are especially uncomfortable when foot jamming. Models like the La Sportiva Solution and Butora Acro are best reserved for steep face moves. Surprisingly, the La Sportiva Skwama does fairly well in cracks, especially finger and tight-hands cracks, although it is designed as more of a steep, sporty shoe. The soft midsole and rubber-coated toe make them easy to squeeze into thin, techy jams.

The Gomi, shown here, does great on pocketed climbs.
The Gomi, shown here, does great on pocketed climbs.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Pockets


The pockets category is an evaluation of how well a given shoe can sink into a rock surface's cavities. Often a shoe with a pointed toe will excel in this particular medium. Moreover, a shoe with a downturn in the toe will offer the added advantage of hooking pockets on steep to overhanging terrain (as opposed to simply pressing down on them), allowing you to pull your hips in close to the wall for efficient body positioning.


Bear in mind that the pockets evaluation is, in many ways, the polar opposite of the crack climbing assessment. As such, the shoes that perform poorly on crack climbs are often among the higher performers on pocketed terrain and vice versa.

Toeing in on tufa blobs in Kalymnos, Greece is similar to toeing in...
Toeing in on tufa blobs in Kalymnos, Greece is similar to toeing in on steep pockets. Here you can see that the curved toe of the Women's Solution helps the climber keep herself pulled into the wall.
Photo: Sam Skrocke

The La Sportiva Solution Comp is our favorite shoe for pocket pulling. As you may recall, the Comp is also the shoe we preferred for steep climbing. This commonality shouldn't be too surprising, considering the similarities in ankle and toe movement across the two techniques. As a bonus, the Comp uses Sportiva's P3 Platform, which helps it retain its downturned toe throughout the life of the shoe. Other top contenders include the La Sportiva Kataki and the Scarpa Instinct VS.

The Solution Comps are great on the steeps, but also super...
The Solution Comps are great on the steeps, but also super comfortable on more vertical terrain - the best of both worlds!
Photo: Eric Bissell

From slabs to overhanging boulders, we put each pair through the...
From slabs to overhanging boulders, we put each pair through the wringer.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Not surprisingly, the flatter soled shoes in this review, such as the Unparallel Up Lace do not perform at a high level when toeing into pockets.

The Vapor is a great all-around shoe - from slabs to steep pockets...
The Vapor is a great all-around shoe - from slabs to steep pockets to vertical edging.
Photo: Eric Bissell

Ease of Use


Ease of use is a minor category for climbing shoes, yet our evaluation revealed noticeable differences between test models. Shoes with Velcro straps are the easiest to get on and off, while lace-ups take a little longer. This feature may not matter to many women because laces afford a customizable fit throughout the upper portion and the toe box, depending on how far the laces go down the upper. For those with oddly proportioned feet, a lace-up like the Scarpa Vapor, La Sportiva Miura, or Scarpa Maestro Mid Eco will let you loosen the fit in key areas and cinch them down in others.


A potentially significant detail that we noticed is that Evolv's synthetic shoes eventually began to stink way more than what we'd consider "normal." Climbing shoes never smell particularly sweet, but we had a lot of other shoes to compare them with, and the leather models are slower to develop an off-putting odor. If you plan to wear your synthetic Evolv shoes regularly, you will likely need to clean and dry them regularly, too.

Conclusion


After many days of research, field tests, and analysis of female-specific climbing shoes, we've granted awards to the shoes that are the best in their class and often surpassed our expectations. However, our review comes with an obvious caveat: climbing shoe fit and performance is subjective; what fits one woman like it was custom-made might cause extreme discomfort to another. We recommend taking our suggestions with a grain of salt and make your own choices by trying them on before making a purchase. And lastly, don't be afraid to check out all the unisex models. There are plenty of worthwhile shoes that don't come in women's specific versions.

Jane Jackson

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