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Best Insulated Jackets for Men of 2021

To find the best men's insulated jackets, we put models from Patagonia, Arc'teryx, Rab, and more to head to head tests
This jacket is breathable and warm, so we could put it on and leave it...
Photo: Matt Bento
Thursday October 7, 2021
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Want to buy the best synthetic insulated jacket? We've bought, tested, and reviewed over 50 of the best insulated jackets in the past eight years and feature 13 of the most popular in our 2021 review. Synthetic insulated jackets have several advantages, including the ability to keep insulating when wet, greater breathability, and generally lower cost when compared to down insulation. Whether you are looking for the warmest jacket you can find to keep you comfortable in the coldest temps, a lightweight and stretchy active layer to wear while working up a sweat, or a jacket with optimal wind resistance, we have you covered with some excellent and affordable recommendations.

Related: Best Insulated Jacket for Women of 2021

Top 13 Product Ratings

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Awards Editors' Choice Award   Best Buy Award Top Pick Award 
Price $300 List
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Overall Score Sort Icon
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69
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Pros Light, easily stowable, very weather resistantLightweight, wind and water resistant, quite warm, durable face fabricWarm, good water resistance, comfortable, excellent mobility, stylish, durableLightweight, warm, great wind protection, sheds water well, affordableVery warm, comfortable fit, seals out the weather
Cons Doesn't breathe, expensiveExpensive, no hem drawcords, hood is slightly tight with a helmet onExpensive, annoying hem cinching buckles, not the lightestDoesn’t breathe well, fit isn’t very athleticHeavier than most, not very breathable, pricey
Bottom Line When it comes to features, this jacket has everything you need and nothing you don'tA versatile and lightweight insulated jacket that offers superior weather resistance, and remains impressively warmThe top overall performer among the active insulating jacketsThe best lightweight insulated outer layer is highly wind resistant and impressively warmA very warm, weather resistant hoody that easily fits over other layers but isn’t too baggy
Rating Categories Arc'teryx Nuclei FL Patagonia DAS Light... Arc'teryx Proton LT... Rab Xenon Hoodie Arc'teryx Atom AR H...
Warmth (25%)
8.0
8.0
6.0
7.0
9.0
Weight And Compressibility (20%)
8.0
8.0
7.0
8.0
4.0
Comfort (20%)
7.0
6.0
9.0
6.0
9.0
Weather Resistance (20%)
8.0
8.0
6.0
8.0
7.0
Breathability (15%)
5.0
5.0
7.0
5.0
4.0
Specs Arc'teryx Nuclei FL Patagonia DAS Light... Arc'teryx Proton LT... Rab Xenon Hoodie Arc'teryx Atom AR H...
Measured Weight (size) 10.5 oz (S) 11.0 oz (S) 12.8 oz (S) 11.0 oz (S) 15.2 oz (S)
Insulation Coreloft (65g/m²) 65 g PlumaFill 100% recycled polyester Coreloft Compact 80 60 g Stratus 120 g/m2 Coreloft body, 80 g/m2 underarms, 60 g/m2 hood - with Dope Permair 20 in armpits
Outer Fabric Arato (10D nylon ripstop) 10-D 100% nylon ripstop Pertex Endurance Fortius Air 20 Atmos ripstop Tyono 30 denier nylon
Stuffs Into Itself? Yes Yes Yes, clip loop Yes, clip loop No
Hood Option? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Number of Pockets 2 zippered hand, 2 internal 1 chest zippered, 2 handwarmer zippered 2 insulated zippered hand, 1 zippered chest 2 zippered hand, 1 zippered internal chest 2 zippered hand, 1 zippered internal chest


Best Overall Insulated Jacket


Arc'teryx Nuclei FL


74
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Warmth 8
  • Weight and Compressibility 8
  • Comfort 7
  • Weather Resistance 8
  • Breathability 5
Weight: 10.5 oz. (S) | Number of pockets: 2 zippered hand, 2 internal
Killer warmth to weight ratio
Strong weather resistance
Stuffs easily into the included stuff sack
Not very breathable
Expensive

On days where cold winds move in during the afternoon, and you tighten your shoulders and core to try and generate some heat, you can pull on the Arc'teryx Nuclei FL for instant warmth. This lightweight jacket has just the right amount of Arc'teryx Coreloft insulation to make it incredibly warm while keeping the weight down. We've seen similarly impressive offerings in the past from Arc'teryx (and Rab and Patagonia, for that matter), but none have hit the mark quite like the Nuclei FL. The fit is perfect, with a long tail that covers most of your butt, sleeves that don't restrict movement through the arms and shoulders, and a hood that fits over a climbing helmet. Its included stuff sack is permanently fixed to an inside pocket, and this jacket stuffs and unpacks easier and faster than any model we've seen in over a decade of testing. The Arato face fabric has a very effective DWR treatment, and despite hearing that it's less durable than Pertex, we didn't feel like the Nuclei is any more fragile than its closest competitors, plus it has a softer feel and no crinkle factor.

This jacket is not a breathable model for stop-and-go activities. Even on easy hikes and approaches, we found ourselves shedding this layer after only a few minutes. Sweat will build up, and the moisture has nowhere to go, so if you aren't careful, you can become a sweaty (and potentially cold) mess in this jacket. For the Nuclei to be a good mid-layer, it needs to be really cold out. It's better suited as a terminal layer on moderately cold days or when you're staying put in camp or hanging out at a belay. Our review selection has similarly performing jackets, but none hit the spot like the Nuclei FL.

Read review: Arcteryx Nuclei FL

Best Bang for the Buck


Rab Xenon Hoodie


69
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Warmth 7
  • Weight and Compressibility 8
  • Comfort 6
  • Weather Resistance 8
  • Breathability 5
Weight: 11.8 oz. (L) | Number of pockets: 2 zippered hand, 1 zippered internal chest
Lightweight and compact
Excellent wind resistance
Affordable
Solid at repelling water
Fit is large
Doesn't breathe well
Not an ideal mid-layer

The Rab Xenon has long been one of the top performers in our comparative testing and one of our favorite synthetic insulated jackets. It shares many of the same characteristics as the Patagonia DAS Light Hoody and the Arcteryx Nuclei FL but is significantly more affordable, making it an optimal choice for the budget-conscious. It also features a very smooth and slick, seamless face fabric that does a great job resisting the wind, which contributes positively to its overall warmth effect. It's lightweight, highly packable, and has a very effective DWR treatment in case you happen to get stuck in a spot of rain or snow. Overall, this is an excellent outer layer that is also one of the most affordable options you will find.

As with any product, there are a few downsides. With a highly wind-resistant shell, the trade-off is much poorer breathability compared to its stretchy counterparts. We also found the fit quite large and borderline baggy, so consider sizing down if you fall between sizes. It's easy to fit layers underneath this jacket, but the larger fit prevented us from wanting to use it as a mid-layer very often. It's also not quite warm enough for us to consider using as a daily winter jacket, and we think it's best suited specifically for outdoor missions. As a wind-resistant, insulating outer layer, this jacket cannot be beaten for almost any cold-weather activity such as hiking, biking, climbing, or running.

Read review: Rab Xenon

Best Insulated Active Mid-Layer


Arc'teryx Atom LT Hoody


68
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Warmth 5
  • Weight and Compressibility 7
  • Comfort 9
  • Weather Resistance 5
  • Breathability 9
Weight: 13.4 oz. (L) | Number of pockets: 2 zippered hand, 1 zippered internal chest
Thin and very breathable
Lightweight
Excellent fit for active use
Doesn't pack into its own pocket
Not the warmest

Active insulated layers have come to dominate this genre of jackets, with the Arc'teryx Atom LT representing the cream of the crop. These jackets tend to be much lighter, with less insulation and excellent breathability, and are typically made of stretchy fabrics to allow for the largest range of motion. We love the Atom LT because its fit is suited for climbing, running, skiing, or performing any other cool weather outdoor sport — a low hem, long arms, and not overly baggy, with excellent shoulder mobility so that we never feel constrained. We found the fit far more athletically minded than the overly constrictive Patagonia Nano-Air, a jacket that has come to define this category. It also pairs lightweight and breathable stretch fleece panels along the side of the body with lightweight Coreloft insulation everywhere else to make it better than any other we've tested at regulating our temperature while working hard.

Active layers are designed to be worn when active, protecting from cold air or wind, but breathable enough that they don't get so hot that you need to take them off. Naturally, then, they are pretty thin, and if you expect to wear this jacket as a stand-alone in winter without moving your body to stay warm, you will likely end up feeling pretty cold. That said, it also serves as an excellent mid-layer for added warmth beneath a thicker outer jacket or shell. We loved it as a winter running jacket, wearing while skinning uphill, winter bouldering, and even for high output nordic skiing. It also serves as a lightweight jacket for chilly mountain evenings and mornings during the summer or shoulder seasons, when a heavier jacket would be overkill.

Read review: Arc'teryx Atom LT Hoody

Our Favorite Warmth Layer


Arc'teryx Atom AR Hoody


69
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Warmth 9
  • Weight and Compressibility 4
  • Comfort 9
  • Weather Resistance 7
  • Breathability 4
Weight: 17.6 oz. (L) | Number of pockets: 2 zippered hand, 1 zippered internal chest
Incredibly comfortable
Very warm
Optimal fit for use as an outer layer
Lighter than other super warm options
Doesn't stuff into own pocket
Not very breathable
A bit pricey

Arc'teryx recently updated most of their synthetic jacket lineup by changing the fit a little and also swapping out the fabrics used for better options. We love the subtle but significant updates, as these jackets are now easily among the most comfortable. The heaviest and thickest one we've reviewed is the Atom AR Hoody, which is our favorite option when we need warmth above all else. It mixes and matches different densities of Coreloft insulation depending on body location, with the majority being a whopping 120 g/m2. This super warm jacket maintains an impressive weight and has an excellent fit for use as an outer layer. There remains plenty of room on the inside for base and mid-layers to ride without feeling overly stuffed, while the arms, shoulders, and hem are all generously sized to give ideal flexibility when skiing, climbing, or even chopping wood. Simply put, this jacket is easily among the warmest we've tested while being far more comfortable and ideal fitting than its closest competition.

As you may expect from a jacket designed to trap as much heat as possible — this one isn't very breathable. The moment we started moving, we usually needed to take it off (although on a few hikes in ~10F weather, we simply kept it on). It's also a bit heavy and bulky, which is another downside that comes with added warmth. There are also more affordable choices to be found if budget is your primary consideration. If you need a warm jacket for everyday use in the winter or an outer jacket to keep you warm when you take breaks on the skin track or while belaying in the ice park, this is the first one that we would recommend checking out.

Read Review: Arc'teryx Atom AR Hoody

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
74
$300
Editors' Choice Award
This jacket is all puff and no fluff, employing the best materials to keep the weight down, while remaining warm and comfortable
72
$329
An amazing jacket for active outdoor pursuits that is an ideal fit for wearing all the time
70
$300
Comfortable, mobile, and stylish, this jacket is ideal for any use
69
$195
Best Buy Award
An ideal outer layer for throwing on when outside during windy and cold days
69
$299
Top Pick Award
Super comfortable and very warm, this jacket is a go-to choice all winter long, regardless of what you are doing
69
$299
A thin, lightweight insulating layer that is ideal for days when you don’t stop moving
68
$259
Top Pick Award
An excellent fitting jacket that is comfortable and breathable for use when active, and also serves as a great lightweight midlayer
68
$220
An effective, affordable insulator, with a great set of features
67
$299
An ultralight mid layer with an excellent warmth to weight ratio
64
$249
A true classic, this contender is stylish and durable, but does not offer the highest performance
64
$260
A good jacket for layering over or wearing as the outer most layer on aerobic missions
62
$190
Good for active pursuits or for extra warmth during moderate seasons, but is not a standalone winter warmth layer
59
$230
A strong performer in terms of breathability, but it doesn't have a very good warmth-to-weight ratio

The Atom LT is a rather thin, lightweight hybrid active layer that...
The Atom LT is a rather thin, lightweight hybrid active layer that combines breathable insulation with stretch fleece panels on the sides for greater breathability. It works great for aerobic workouts on cold winter days, such as classic cross country skiing.

Why You Should Trust Us


This review is a collaboration between two of our top reviewers --Andy Wellman and Matt Bento. Andy is a former climbing guidebook publisher who has spent many years reviewing down jackets for OutdoorGearLab, before switching over to cover insulated jackets. As a lifelong and obsessive climber, backcountry skier, backpacker, and mountain town liver, Andy has spent pretty much his whole life wearing insulated jackets, of both types, for comfort and out of absolute necessity. He is joined by Yosemite Search and Rescue member Matt Bento. For the last ten years, Matt has been climbing and living out of his vehicle at climbing destinations all over the country. This way of life means that Matt is regularly outside the elements, perpetually putting his gear to the test. With such a constant and varied need for quality gear, Matt has a unique foundation of knowledge to test and judge insulated jackets.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Choosing which jackets to include in this review starts with lots of research by our reviewers and editors, ensuring we keep our finger on the pulse regarding the newest technologies and upgrades in the market. After buying every jacket we review, a tactic that allows us to maintain our unbiased stance, we put these jackets to the test in the real world, using them the same way you do, or would like to. We wear them while backcountry skiing, backpacking, hiking, ice, and alpine climbing, belaying when the temps are "sendy," shoveling our walk, walking our dog, nordic skiing, sitting around the campfire, and almost all moments in between. We also devised more objective tests, eventually rating each product on several metrics, including warmth, weather resistance, weight and compressibility, breathability, and even style. The recommendations you find here are the product of this hands-on testing.

Related: How We Tested Insulated Jackets

Analysis and Test Results


The jackets tested in this category all use a variety of synthetic insulation. In recent years, there has been a significant shift in the insulated jacket market; there are now two main kinds of jackets: Active insulating layers and insulated jackets for warmth. Active layers tend to be thinner, made with stretch fabrics, and are highly breathable. They are designed to be worn all the time, can be layered over, and thrive on winter days when you are working up a sweat.

Traditionally, insulated jackets have been designed to be warm and present a less expensive and more water-resistant option compared to down. These types of jackets still exist, and we have tested both varieties in this review. While we grade each choice on six metrics described below, be sure to identify which type of jacket — active or warmth — is likely to serve you best to find the best fit for your needs.

Related: Buying Advice for Insulated Jackets

We love the instant warmth we feel as soon as we put on the...
We love the instant warmth we feel as soon as we put on the Arc'teryx Nuclei.
Photo: Matt Bento

Value


A good insulated jacket doesn't have to cost an arm and a leg, but you should plan on spending a good chunk of change for excellent quality. Synthetic jackets have historically been less spendy than down competitors, but with their rise in popularity, the field (at least price-wise) has evened out. The Rab Xenon is a perfect example of excellent value. It's one of the least expensive options in the field while also being a top performer. The best value of all is likely the LL Bean PrimaLoft Packaway Hooded, which isn't the warmest choice you can buy but comes at an unbeatable price point.


Warmth


First and foremost, your jacket, combined with your other layers, needs to keep you warm in the weather you plan to use it in. We've weighted this metric most heavily: 25% of each model's score. Gram for gram, down insulation is warmer than synthetic insulation; however, advances in synthetics materials are quickly catching up to the superior warmth-to-weight ratio of down. However, the scores awarded to the jackets in this review only compare their warmth relative to each other, not compared to down jackets. Since this review includes jackets that are both thick and thin and ones that are designed as activewear as well as those designed for maximum warmth, it's probably helpful to identify what type of jacket best suits your needs before giving too much importance to absolute warmth. After you know which kind you want, compare like types to like types.


According to our research, the warmest choice is the Arc'teryx Atom AR, which has the side benefit of looking nice for around-town use, and features 120g/m of Coreloft insulation in the torso region. The Rab Nebula Pro also gets top marks for warmth and will be a little easier on your wallet, though you'll need a shell during the worst weather. Comparing warmth between lightly insulated models is challenging. Some are designed to allow wind to blow through portions of the jacket for breathability, while others are wind resistant. We rated their warmth as an outer layer when worn over baselayers with a light breeze to pick a comparison point.

Standing still outside playing with Rishi during the first major...
Standing still outside playing with Rishi during the first major snowstorm of the winter in Oregon, testing different jackets for warmth compared to the competition. We found it to be relatively warm for a thin, breathable active layer, although of course nowhere near as warm as fatter puffy jackets.

Among the lighter weight models tested, the Arc'teryx Nuclei FL, Patagonia DAS Light Hoody, Rab Xenon, and Black Diamond First Light Stretch Hoody struck us as the warmest choices. Some very light jackets can still be impressively warm. For instance, the Patagonia Micro Puff uses PlumaFill insulation, resulting in extraordinary warmth, despite being the lightest jacket in the review by several ounces. Unfortunately, its super lightweight shell makes it very vulnerable to abrasion from rocks and brush. Additionally, the PlumaFill tends to leak out in long strands once there is a tear in the shell.

A form-fitting lightweight jacket works well as a mid layer.
A form-fitting lightweight jacket works well as a mid layer.
Photo: Matt Bento

Weight & Compressibility


Since we find ourselves taking an insulated jacket pretty much everywhere, light is usually right. All else being equal, we'll choose the lighter, more compressible model almost every time for outdoor pursuits. The Patagonia Micro Puff takes the lightweight cake, weighing in at a mere 8.15 ounces for a size small. The Arc'teryx Nuclei is the next lightest choice, followed very closely by the Rab Xenon and the Patagonia DAS Light Hoody. All have outstanding warmth-to-weight ratios when used as a mid-layer. It's hard to beat the Xenon if you are looking for the perfect balance between warmth and weight. It's less expensive than many of its competitors and significantly more durable than the Micro Puff.


We appreciate a jacket that stows away in one of its pockets. This makes just-in-case storage in a backpack easy and keeps the outer fabric clean, protecting its DWR treatment. Most models tested stuff into a pocket or come with a stuff sack. The Xenon is our favorite stuffable piece, as it is compact, has a clip loop, and regularly traveled on our testers' climbing harnesses. While it is a top scorer, the Arc'teryx Atom LT Hoody, unfortunately, doesn't include a stuff sack or a stuffable pocket option. The Patagonia Nano-Air Hoody stuffs down into its pocket, except that it's so challenging to get the jacket to fit in the pocket that we didn't find this feature very useful. The Arc'teryx Nuclei FL has a stuff sack permanently attached to the inner pocket. While it doesn't technically stuff into its own pocket, we found this design equally effective and easier to use than many stuff pocket designs. We assigned weight and compressibility 20% of a product's final score.

Five jackets that stuff into one of their own pockets for easier...
Five jackets that stuff into one of their own pockets for easier transport, as well as a Nalgene bottle for size reference. The black jacket is the Nano Air.

Durability
While synthetic insulation has become more compressible, long-term durability is still an issue. The fiber's ability to rebound to full loft decreases with repeated compression, and the more tightly compacted they are, the more wear the fiber matrices incur; we recommend that you always store jackets in their uncompressed state.

Though no the lightest, the Rab Nebula provides superb warmth on...
Though no the lightest, the Rab Nebula provides superb warmth on chilly days.
Photo: Jason Peters

Comfort


In this category, we assessed each piece's mobility and small details that made each more comfortable. We found that some moved with us better than others; some had features, like fleece-lined chin guards or hand pockets, that deliver happiness for minimal weight. We also note the fit characteristics of each jacket, giving you a better idea of what body types each jacket fits best and helping you choose the correct size.


Let's discuss mobility first, as this is a crucial jacket attribute. When you reach overhead while climbing or digging in your pack, a model that stays put (without the waist hem being tugged upwards) is appreciated. We also assessed how well we could move our arms, as well as the hood mobility.

Ease-of-use is another consideration when comparing jackets. Nice zipper pulls, pockets in the right places, and convenient hood adjustments are a few features that contribute to higher comfort scores. The texture of interior fabrics and the presence, or not, of features such as soft chin guards are nice touches that also affect a jacket's comfort level.

The inside of the hand pockets are lined with tricot fleece, which...
The inside of the hand pockets are lined with tricot fleece, which is fine-grained and very soft. We love this nice touch which puts a smile on our face whenever we put our hands in there. You can also see the grey reflective stripe that lines the pocket opening on the upper side.

We've found that Arc'teryx jackets, in particular, stand out when it comes to comfort due to a combination of unobstructed mobility, perfect fit, and soft, comfy fabrics. The Arc'teryx Proton LT Hoody, Nuclei FL, Atom LT, and Atom AR all received high comfort scores; with low-bulk cuffs, well-shaped zipper pulls, very comfortable inner fabrics, and excellent mobility. Among the heavier, warmer options, we think the Rab Nebula Pro is particularly comfy, with thoughtful features like a padded collar and fleecy pockets. Comfort accounts for 20% of a product's final score.

A nice touch on the inside of the collar is this strip of soft grey...
A nice touch on the inside of the collar is this strip of soft grey fabric that feels nice where it rubs against our chin and effectively covers up the zipper.

Weather Resistance


We've all found ourselves in torrential downpours and fierce winds despite a bluebird forecast. In these situations, the right insulated jacket can save your life or at least significantly reduce the suffer factor. Most of the products tested are designed to be worn primarily as a mid-layer with a rain jacket or hardshell on top for foul weather. That said, many users employ these products as their outer layer if the conditions aren't too severe. We've worn all of these jackets as outer layers in all sorts of weather while climbing, skiing, and simply hiking and have found some that provide significantly better protection than others.


Insulated jackets are usually not designed to be waterproof or windproof. If you're looking for a jacket that combines the warmth of an insulated jacket with the weather protection of a hardshell, consider a ski jacket.


Models with a continuous or nearly continuous outer fabric do a better job of stopping the wind. The Arc'teryx Nuclei FL, Rab Xenon, and the Patagonia DAS Light Hoody are the most weather resistant of the insulated products tested. All three feature slippery nylon ripstop fabric with a durable water repellent coating that works in light rain and snow, making them practically windproof, and have a design that minimizes seams where air can leak. These are the only light models we'd purposefully wear without a shell during a short, light rain. However, the Arc'teryx Atom AR Hoody also beads water and offers a high level of water resistance, as does the impressively weather-resistant LL Bean PrimaLoft Packaway, which is both water-resistant and functionally windproof.

Testing water resistance and DWR coatings by spraying with the hose...
Testing water resistance and DWR coatings by spraying with the hose, we were very impressed with the performance of this jacket, as well as all the other Arc'teryx models, which had the most effective DWR coating.

Hoods or No Hood?
We enjoy having hoods since they provide a warmth upgrade for little weight. A hood is impossible to misplace, unlike a hat. We wore hoods under and over climbing helmets. Our favorite hood designs feature cinch cords that tighten the hood around the head and not the face, although more and more hoods are being designed with only elastic to secure the facial opening. While this design is lighter and simpler, it cannot adjust depending on your head shape or the weather. A hood can sometimes get in the way if you're planning to wear your layer primarily under a shell that has its own hood. Most hooded models tested are available in hoodless versions, which we noted in our specs table.

All of the models tested purport to come with a Durable Water Repellent (DWR) treatment applied to the face fabric. This causes light rain to bead off the shell and keeps insulation dry, as long as it is effective (not all are). The Proton LT treatment was the most effective of those found on stretchy, breathable face fabrics. The DWR treatments on some of the other lightweight jackets were far less effective. Weather resistance accounts for 15% of a product's final score.

Breathability


Breathable insulated jackets are a newish arrival on the outerwear scene and are designed to regulate temperature and wick sweat during high-energy activities in cold weather. The introduction of Polartec Alpha and, more recently, FullRange insulation from Patagonia allows a new approach to breathability. The insulation itself moves moisture and promotes better airflow. Perhaps the most popular and recognizable of these jackets, the Patagonia Nano-Air Hoody, pairs FullRange insulation with stretchy, breathable shell fabric and a moisture-wicking lining to create one of the most breathable models tested.

Running uphill repeats on a hot day to test and compare the...
Running uphill repeats on a hot day to test and compare the breathability of our test group, we found that running in the Nano-Air was far more pleasant than some of the options that didn't breathe well, cementing its place as the best choice if you want breathable insulation.

The Nano-Air Hoody is one of the most breathable options, according to our testing. Not far behind is the Arc'teryx Proton LT Hoody. The Proton isn't as light as the Nano-Air, but it's nearly as breathable and much more durable. Other companies have also begun imitating this style of jacket. For high-energy activities, like backcountry skiing, cross-country skiing, and winter running, these styles of jackets are game-changers. Pair these with a lightweight windbreaker if you need some outer protection.


The long-standing approach to making a Primaloft or Coreloft product better suited to exertion is to incorporate low-bulk, breathable panels under the jacket's arms and on the sides. The Arc'teryx Atom LT takes this hybrid approach. Wind-resistant fabric protects your core, while stretchy side panels dump excess heat. This hybrid earned top breathability scores. The medium and heavy models tested were the least breathable, but they work the best as terminal layers, keeping you warm when you've stopped to take a break while hiking or waiting at a windy belay station. While breathability is a critical component of a synthetic jacket's performance, especially the active layers, it's also very hard to quantify. For that reason, we only weighted it as 15% of a product's final score.

Active insulated layers work better when you are moving and thus...
Active insulated layers work better when you are moving and thus stretching the jacket, while trapping warm air more effectively when you are standing still. Here on a fall hike in the Three Sisters Wilderness, OR.

Conclusion


With the vast assortment of choices available, choosing the best jacket can be tough. We rank warmth and weight high on the list of essential attributes, yet other features, such as weather resistance and breathability, may prove to be significant depending on your use. Remember to ask yourself what you'll be doing in your insulated jacket. Will you be running or ski touring? Then go for something light and breathable — choose an active mid-layer. Want a single jacket that will work nearly every day or activity you may need it for? Then look no further than the Arc'teryx Nuclei FL, DAS Light Hoody, or the Xenon.

On a hike during the clearing storm wearing the Atom AR. Despite the...
On a hike during the clearing storm wearing the Atom AR. Despite the very chilly temps, we were perfectly comfortable on this mountain hike with only a t-shirt on beneath.

Matt Bento & Andy Wellman

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