Reviews You Can Rely On

Best Paddle Board Paddle of 2021

We bought and tested paddles from Werner, Kialoa, Aqua Bound, and others to help you find the best
We did like the blade shape of the BPS, with its scooped dihedral desi...
Photo: Jenna Ammerman
Thursday July 29, 2021
  • Share this article:
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
After carefully researching and evaluating over 125 different paddles, we bought the 14 best SUP paddles currently on the market to test head-to-head and help you find the best. We used these paddles with all sorts of different SUPs on lakes, rivers, and ponds, rating and comparing their paddling efficiency, comfort, and overall feel. We also looked at how convenient the locking mechanism is to use and how easy to adjust each paddle is. Keep reading to see which SUP paddle reigned supreme, which is the best budget option, and which one we think paddles the best.

Top 14 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 14
< Previous | Compare | Next >
 
Awards Editors' Choice Award  Editors' Choice Award  Best Buy Award 
Price Check Price at REI
Compare at 3 sellers
Check Price at REI
Compare at 2 sellers
Check Price at REI
Compare at 2 sellers
$199 List
Check Price at REI
$129 List
$114.00 at Backcountry
Overall Score Sort Icon
92
90
90
86
85
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Lightweight, easy to adjust, high performanceExcellent paddle performance, incredibly lightweightFantastic paddling performance, easy to adjust, stylishEasy to adjust, sleek, great paddle performanceCuts cleanly through water, durable blade
Cons Pricey, blade can flutterPremium pricePriceyHandle more prone to hotspotsHeavy, looks like a toy
Bottom Line The Trance is a breath of fresh air, with good performance and an unbelievably lightweight constructionThis paddle is one of the best we have seen, particularly if you value weight savings above all elseWe think this is one of the best options for most people shopping for a top-tier paddleThis top-tier SUP paddle is designed with female paddlers in mind, offering easy adjustability and excellent paddling performanceThe Vibe is a great all-around paddle that moves water well and is easy to manage
Rating Categories Werner Trance 95 Pe... Aqua Bound Malta Ca... Aqua Bound Malta Fi... Kialoa Tiare Fiberg... Werner Vibe
Performance (30%)
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
9.0
Weight (20%)
10.0
10.0
10.0
7.0
6.0
Ease Of Adjustment (20%)
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
Locking Mechanism (20%)
10.0
9.0
9.0
10.0
10.0
Aesthetics (10%)
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
6.0
Specs Werner Trance 95 Pe... Aqua Bound Malta Ca... Aqua Bound Malta Fi... Kialoa Tiare Fiberg... Werner Vibe
Paddle Weight 1.2 lbs 1.1 lbs 1.2 lbs 1.5 lbs 1.7 lbs
Shaft Material Carbon 100% Carbon 100% Carbon Fiberglass Fiberglass
Blade Dimensions 95 sq in 87 sq in 87 sq in 80 sq in 100 sq in
Blade Material Carbon Compression Molded Carbon Fiberglass Fiberglass Fibrlite Injection molded fiberglass
Blade Design Dihedral Dihedral Dihedral Dihedral Dihedral
Blade Shape Rectangular Rectangular Rectangular Teardrop Rectangular
Offset 10 degrees 10 degrees 10 degrees 10 degrees 10 degrees
Adjustablility (inches) 8 in 10 in 10 in 16 in 16 in
Length Range (inches) 70 in - 78 in, 74 in - 82 in, 80 in - 88 in 64 - 74, 70 - 80, 76 - 86 in 64 - 74, 70 - 80, 76 - 86 in 66 in - 82 in 68 in - 84 in
Number of Pieces 1-piece (available in 1, 2, or 3) 2-piece 2-piece 2-piece 3-piece (available in 1, 2, or 3)
Compact Size NA 70 in 70 in 66 in 34.5 in
Includes Cover No No No No No
Locking Mechanism Handle LeverLock Interior Spring Pin Interior Spring Pin Handle LeverLock Handle LeverLock


Best Overall Adjustable SUP Paddle


Werner Trance 95 Performance


92
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Performance 8
  • Weight 10
  • Ease of Adjustment 10
  • Locking Mechanism 10
  • Aesthetics 8
Weight: 1.2 lbs | Offset: 10 degrees
Lightweight
Easy to adjust
High performance
Expensive
Subtle flutter

The Werner Trance 95 Performance thoroughly impressed us with its top-notch performance across the board in all of our tests. This paddle is designed carefully, and the details are all well-crafted with ease-of-use in mind. The lightest paddle in our test, with a carbon fiber shaft and blade, this model slices through the water. Plus, the highest-scoring adjustment system is easy to use and doesn't get in the way of paddling.

Regrettably, all this performance comes at a bit of a cost. Literally. This SUP paddle is one of the most expensive models we have tested to date and its premium price tag may put it out of most people's budgets. In our minds, it's an undeniably excellent and high-performing paddle — our all-time favorite — and can be well worth the investment for SUP aficionados but is a bit costly for the casual paddler.

Read review: Werner Trance 95 Performance

Best Fiberglass SUP Paddle


Aqua Bound Malta Fiberglass 2-Piece


90
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Performance 8
  • Weight 10
  • Ease of Adjustment 10
  • Locking Mechanism 9
  • Aesthetics 8
Weight: 1.16 lbs | Offset: 10 degrees
Very lightweight
Great paddling performance
Stylish
Not our favorite locking mechanism

Overall, the Aqua Bound Malta is by far one of our most favorite SUP paddles of all time. This top-tier fiberglass paddle delivers practically unparalleled on-the-water performance, making for efficient and powerful paddle strokes. It’s one of the lightest paddles we have ever tested, giving you a snappy and practically effortless recovery on each stroke, and the dihedral cleanly scoops the water without fluttering. It’s easy to adjust and looks great, available in three different colors to match your personal preferences.

The locking mechanism is solid and works well but we found that we slightly preferred the internal LeverLock system to the internal snap pin. You only have the option of discrete positions with the snap pin, compared to a continual range of adjustment with the LeverLock. We also could see the snap pin wearing out and getting looser over time a little faster than the LeverLock. However, we still think this is one of the best paddles you can get — particularly if you are trying to spend a little less than an all-carbon model — and highly recommend it to just about everyone.

Read review: Aqua Bound Malta 2-Piece Fiberglass

Outstanding Buy for Performance


Werner Vibe


85
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Performance 9
  • Weight 6
  • Ease of Adjustment 10
  • Locking Mechanism 10
  • Aesthetics 6
Weight: 1.7 lbs | Offset: 10 degrees
Relatively inexpensive
Easy to adjust
High performance
Heavier than other high-performing models

Designed for middle-of-the-road paddlers who are looking for good performance and sturdy craftsmanship, the Werner Vibe features a rectangular blade with a scooped profile and dihedral ridge. We found that this shape allowed for a gentler catch than other models while at the same time providing a stable forward pull. Also, the Vibe features our favorite locking mechanism on the market. As a result, the Vibe is one of the highest performing paddles, with an easy-to-use adjustment system, average weight, and one of the best price points in the review.

However, the Werner Vibe is made of slightly lower-quality materials than some top-tier options and is slightly heavier. While these might be significant flaws to expert paddlers making very long trips, we feel the Vibe is the best paddle for most people, offering excellent performance at a much more reasonable price tag.

Read review: Werner Vibe

Best on a Tight Budget


Bullet Proof Surf Alloy


61
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Performance 7
  • Weight 3
  • Ease of Adjustment 7
  • Locking Mechanism 7
  • Aesthetics 6
Weight: 2.2 lbs | Offset: 10.5 degrees
Durable
Easy to adjust
Inexpensive
Heavy

The outstanding value, award-winning Bullet Proof Surf Adjustable Alloy, is a rugged product with a tough nylon blade aluminum shaft. A collar clamp adjustment and locking mechanism, also known as the TwinPin system, and solid scores across our scoring metrics earned this model a special place in our testers' hearts. All of this comes at an extremely affordable price, making the Alloy the most budget-friendly SUP paddle we tested.

It's a hefty paddle, so it isn't the best choice if you're paddling for longer distances. Although heavier than the lightest models in our test, this product is built to withstand more wear than paddles built entirely from carbon. If you want a functional, highly affordable paddle that will last, this is a great choice.

Read review: Bullet Proof Surf Alloy

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
92
$380
Editors' Choice Award
A high scorer, this model is a lightweight high performer
90
$335
This incredibly lightweight paddle is one of our favorites, though it can be hard on the pocketbook
90
$270
Editors' Choice Award
This paddle is one of our all-time favorites and a great choice for the majority of people searching for a premium paddle
86
$199
This excellent paddle is designed for the female paddler looking to take their paddling to the next level
85
$129
Best Buy Award
The vibe provides excellent value for a high performing paddle
84
$190
High-performance with an easy locking mechanism, this paddle is for serious users
77
$159
The Makai packs a performance punch, but it is a bit on the hefty side
74
$300
This sleek and stylish paddle breaks down into 3 pieces for ease of transport but we wished it paddled a bit better
70
$190
The NRS Rush is surf optimized paddle and a good travel option with its lightweight design
61
$30
Best Buy Award
Scoring well across the board, this Best Buy award winner is budget-friendly, tough, and durable
59
$60
If you're looking for a paddle that won't break the bank, this is your option
59
$90
Overall, this fiberglass paddle from BPS failed to impress with its overall mediocre performance
58
$165
This paddle performs decently well but failed to overly distinguish itself from the rest of the pack
50
$42
While this paddle is very cheap, it, unfortunately, delivered lackluster results

Our favorite paddle - the Werner Trance 95.  One of many we...
Our favorite paddle - the Werner Trance 95. One of many we purchased and tested in the field for this review.

Why You Should Trust Us


Our Expert Panel of reviewers consists of Review Editors Shey Kiester, Megan Ferney, and Marissa Fox. Shey has tested over 50 paddleboards for OutdoorGearLab and holds a degree in creative writing and English rhetoric from the University of Alaska. Additionally, she is an accomplished alpine climber and has written for Alpinist, American Alpine Journal, and Backpacker, among others. Megan grew up paddling the waters of Lake Coeur d'Alene and is a rock climber, equestrian, backpacker, and outdoor educator. She holds a Bachelor's degree in education and a Master's in Organizational Leadership. Marissa has spent most of her life excelling at board sports on the water (liquid or frozen), whether it is paddleboarding, surfing, or snowboarding. She is not only an avid stand-up paddleboarder but is also a PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer and a former professional snowboarder.

We spent dozens and dozens of hours comparing and scoring the performance of these paddles head-to-head at locations in Idaho and northern California. We tried them out with different stand-up paddleboards on bodies of water ranging from tiny rivers to giant alpine lakes. Additionally, we also paddled in a variety of different wind and weather conditions, running the gamut from mirror-like water early in the morning to windy and wavy conditions where it was tough to remain standing. During this time, we also assembled, disassembled, and transported these paddles repeatedly to understand how they performed out of the water and judged their visual appeal and overall aesthetics.

Related: How We Tested SUP Paddles

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Analysis and Test Results


In addition to our expert testers, we also had a variety of other paddlers try out these products and provide input, ranging from first-time SUPers to experts to river rats with a ton of boating experience who were new to the SUP world. We aggregated their opinions, allowing us to form a very well-rounded view of each product. We divided our testing process into five weighted rating metrics: Performance, Weight, Ease of Adjustment, Locking Mechanism, and Aesthetics. These metrics are weighted based on our opinion of their importance, which may not align exactly with your needs. If a paddle performs well in an area of interest for you, it could be a great choice, even if it isn't one of our award winners.

Related: Buying Advice for SUP Paddles

Value


While the Editors' favorite Werner Trance may have topped the charts in terms of overall performance, it is far from a great value. It pairs its top-notch performance with a premium price that is far more than many people want to pay for a paddle.

If you are shopping on a budget but don't want to make significant concessions in paddling performance, then the great value award-winning Werner Vibe is where you should start. This paddle costs quite a bit less than the top-tier paddles and holds its own — or even exceeds them — when it comes to paddling performance. It doesn't look as good and is a little heavier but will save you quite a bit of cash. If the price tag on the Vibe is still too high for you, then you should consider the BPS Alloy. It's a bare-bones paddle that has plenty of flaws, but it can propel you through the water fairly well and retails at a fraction of the cost of the other award winners.

The Werner Vibe offers nearly top-of-the-line performance for a...
The Werner Vibe offers nearly top-of-the-line performance for a middle-of-the-road price.

Performance


Our Performance metric is the most important of all our testing metrics, accounting for 30% of each adjustable SUP paddle's overall score. We were looking for paddles that excelled for all-around use and scored them highest, compared to paddles that are specifically designed for performance SUP racing or surfing.

Paddle Offset — A 12-degree offset is ideal for SUP racing. It keeps the blade vertical in the water for longer, increasing power. A shallow offset of 7 or so degrees helps you brace the paddle flat against the surface of the water for stability during activities like surfing. For the rest of us, an offset angle around 10 degrees is an ideal mix of the two.

The paddles in this review cover the spectrum of different blade shapes and angles, ranging from rectangular or teardrop paddles, with flat, concave, scooped, or dihedral profiles. In particular, we looked at four key points to compare the paddling performance of each product: paddle catch or the initial slice into the water, power or the pull of the blade through the water, exit, or the way the paddle feathers out of the water, and Recovery or how easy and comfortable it is to set up for the next stroke.


The Werner Vibe and the Aqua Bound Performance topped the charts in this metric. The Werner Vibe features a rectangular shape that is slightly curved at the bottom and has a scooped profile, which is split by a ridge to make a dihedral shape. The ridge helps the water to flow evenly across both sides of the paddle, essentially eliminating flutter. The Aqua Bound has a similar scooped profile, though maybe a slightly less aggressive dihedral. Both of these paddles enter and exit the water smoothly and firmly catch the water, allowing you to apply plenty of power.

The scooped blade of the Vibe easily catches the water.
The scooped blade of the Vibe easily catches the water.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

The Werner Trance, the Kialoa Makai, the Aqua Bound Malta Carbon, the Aqua Bound Malta Fiberglass, and the Kialoa Tiare Fiberglass all followed in terms of on-the-water performance. The Trance has blades with slight dihedral angles, but it is much less pronounced than the Vibe's very visible scoop.

The Werner Trance has a high-quality carbon blade with a foam core.
The Werner Trance has a high-quality carbon blade with a foam core.

These both feel great to paddle, but we did notice a subtle flutter in the water with both of these paddles when pulling with maximum power. This is a very trivial issue, and you may not even notice it, but we never ran into this issue with paddles that had a more aggressive dihedral.

The Makai performs very similar but it does have a bit less power than the Trance, due to its smaller blade. This can actually be an asset and make it easier to paddle if you don’t have the most upper body strength.

The Makai packs plenty of power but doesn&#039;t have the smoothest catch...
The Makai packs plenty of power but doesn't have the smoothest catch we have seen to date.
Photo: Megan Ferney

Both the Malta Carbon and the Malta Fiberglass have nearly identical paddling performance, with the Carbon just being the tiniest bit lighter — practically unnoticeable. These paddles both efficiently catch the water, with a rectangular blade and dihedral similar to the Trance. However, we noticed less flutter with the slightly smaller blade area. This pair of paddles are comfortable to hold, with clean entries and exits from the water.

The Malta Carbon is one of our favorites when it comes to paddling...
The Malta Carbon is one of our favorites when it comes to paddling performance.
Photo: David Wise

The Kialoa Tiare Fiberglass also is one of our favorites when it comes to paddling performance. Designed by female paddlers for female paddles, it’s a great option for ladies looking to take their paddling to the next level. It has a smaller teardrop blade that feels great to paddle with and a dihedral design to catch the water. The smaller blade area makes it less fatiguing and more suited to a quicker cadence paddle, with less power per stroke than something like the Trance.

The smaller teardrop blade on this paddle makes it easier for a...
The smaller teardrop blade on this paddle makes it easier for a faster cadence.
Photo: David Wise

The Super Paddles Elite 12K Bamboo Classic is solid when it comes to paddling performance but does have some flaws that hold it back from the top group — mainly that its shaft feels a little bendier than desirable, most likely from its three-piece construction.

The 3-piece Super Paddles Bamboo Classic has a bit more flex than...
The 3-piece Super Paddles Bamboo Classic has a bit more flex than some of the other paddles.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

While the Bamboo Classic feels a little more flexible than desired, it was nothing compared to the BPS Adjustable or the BPS Alloy paddles. This pair both enter and exit the water well, but we found them quite deficient when it comes to the power stroke, exhibiting a noticeable bend even when only putting mild to moderate amounts of effort into the paddle stroke.

Finishing at the back of the pack are the SUPply Co 3-piece and the Isle 2-Piece Carbon. The Surf & SUP just feels cheap to us with plenty of flex and is one of the heaviest paddles.

While we love the pun in the name, this paddle just couldn&#039;t compare...
While we love the pun in the name, this paddle just couldn't compare to the rest.
Photo: David Wise

The Isle is also very heavy — surprising for a “Carbon” paddle — and seemed to sustain a great deal of wear and tear for relatively light use in our experience.

Weight


There is often a direct correlation between lighter paddles and higher-performing paddles. This extra weight might not seem like much now, but trust us, once you're a mile into your paddle, your arms will notice the extra weight. If you are planning on longer missions or want to save your strength for speed, keep this metric in mind. Also, remember that lower weights usually correlate with higher prices. Adjustable SUP paddles typically weigh between one to three pounds.


In general, carbon correlates to a lower weight, and the Werner Trance and the Aqua Bound Malta Carbon are no exception. Both weigh just over a pound and are some of the lightest products in the review.

The Malta Fiberglass easily holds its own against the all-carbon...
The Malta Fiberglass easily holds its own against the all-carbon options.
Photo: David Wise

The Aqua Bound Malta Fiberglass also is a top contender in this category, weighing just slightly less than the Trance.


The Aqua Bound Challenge and the NRS Rush are right behind the top-tier paddles, tipping the scales with just a few ounces more — but still making it under the 1.5-pound mark.

Above this mark is where our paddlers really started to notice the additional heft. Not all weight is created equal. If the weight is in the blade, the paddle can feel like it generates momentum while paddling. The Kialoa Tiare Fiberglass and the Super Paddles Bamboo Classic both measure in at around 1.5 pounds but didn’t feel hefty at all. In contrast, paddlers often commented on how hefty the 1.7 pounds Werner Vibe or BPS Adjustable Fiberglass felt. We don't think the 0.1 - 0.2 pounds is what made the difference.

Finishing at the back of the group, the SUPply Co 3-piece and the Isle Carbon both tip the scales at 2.13 and 1.98 pounds, respectively. This makes them some of the heaviest paddles we have seen — and docking them quite a few points in this metric.

As a rule, fiberglass and carbon-constructed models weigh less than models made with aluminum or nylon. However, heavier materials often offer more durability throughout the product's lifespan. You may be willing to sacrifice performance for a product that may last longer. For example, the Vibe, Malta Fiberglass, Kialoa Tiare, and the Makai are made of fiberglass. The Trance and Malta Carbon are expensive options that can be practically delicate in comparison to a less expensive, heavy aluminum paddle.

The TwinPin system is fine but isn&#039;t our favorite locking mechanism.
The TwinPin system is fine but isn't our favorite locking mechanism.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Ease of Adjustment


All the paddles in this review are adjustable, meaning that the user can change their height to suit their needs and personal comfort. The paddles in this review have an adjustment range spanning from 8 to 18 inches. Different paddles use different adjustment mechanisms, which we discuss in detail in the locking mechanism metric. Some of these paddles offer several sizes that you can then adjust further.


The Werner Trance, the Vibe, the Kialoa Tiare, and the Kialoa Makai use a LeverLock system. This system is sleek and easy to use, making it a breeze to adjust the length of these paddles on or off the water. These paddles have impressive adjustment ranges and we like that you have the entirety of this range available to you, compared to discrete adjustment holes every few inches.

The Aqua-Bound Challenge, the Malta Fiberglass, and Malta Carbon rely on a spring-loaded stainless steel button and a set of adjustment holes as a locking mechanism, called a snap-button adjust. You depress the button and slide the paddle to the length you want. It locks into position when the button snaps into one of the adjustment holes. Unfortunately, you are limited to the lengths corresponding to the different adjustment holes. We do like how clean this system is compared to the external cam clamps or mid-shaft pin systems but we could see the adjustment holes start to loosen over time with extended use.

The TwinPin system isn&#039;t our favorite.
The TwinPin system isn't our favorite.

Paddles with a TwinPin, mid-shaft lever are also considered easy to adjust, mainly because this model does not require a screwdriver to tighten it. The Own the Wave, SUPply Co 3-piece, and BPS models featured this technology, which operates by pushing out a "C" shaped collar clamp that releases an attached stainless steel pin from its adjustment hole. This allows you to adjust the handle end of the shaft. When you've reached your desired length, you push the clamp back in towards the shaft, and the pin goes into the nearest hole.

The final adjustment system is found on the Super Paddles Elite 12K and the Isle 2-Piece Carbon. Confusingly enough, it is also sometimes referred to as the LeverLock system, though it is more of a cam lock. This system operates by lifting a lever located on the shaft that releases tension and allows you to move the handle end of the shaft. However, this system requires a screwdriver to adjust the clamping pressure, which can take some amount of tweaking to get right.

The less loved version of a &quot;LeverLock&quot; system.
The less loved version of a "LeverLock" system.

Locking Mechanism


Our next round of tests focused on the locking mechanisms on each paddle. We looked for paddles with mechanisms that both securely held each paddle at the desired length and are smooth and easy to operate.

Of all the paddles we have tried, we like the LeverLock system the most. This locking mechanism is present on the Werner Vibe, Werner Trance, and the Kialoa Makai. This mechanism has a lever that flips out from the paddle when you want to adjust the length and then folds back when you want to lock it into position. This makes it very easy to use, all while maintaining a low profile and securely clamping the paddle at the length you want.


The second-best system is the snap-button adjust, which features a button that you push to release the handle. This system has adjustment holes that are 1.5- 2 inches apart. It is intuitive, quick, and has few moving parts, meaning that it is likely to last a while. However, we have read reviews about these buttons rusting off. We've never experienced that ourselves but it is something to consider if you live in a more corrosion-prone environment. The Aqua Bound Malta Carbon and the Aqua Bound Malta Fiberglass both have this system.

The Aqua-Bound paddle, at top, has a push-button adjustment system.
The Aqua-Bound paddle, at top, has a push-button adjustment system.

The Twin-Pin or Dual-Pin is next in our minds. We do love how simple and easy to operate this locking system is, with the dual pins housed in an external collar that slides in and out of adjustment holes. This minimizes the chance for any slop and puts less stress on each adjustment hole and pin than the single-pin system. However, it can take a bit more force to lock or unlock and is much less clean in appearance, with the bulky external collar mid-paddle shaft. The SUPply Co 3-piece, the BPS Surf Adjustable, and the BPS Alloy all share this system.

The Family Adjustable, cam clamp. , and EasyClip systems on the rest of the paddles all work similarly, using an adjustment lever on the shaft. When it is flipped out, it releases the tension of the handle end of the shaft inside the blade end. The handle end can then be moved up or down to the desired paddler height. This was our testers' least favorite system, as it often required a screwdriver to fine-tune and can make on-the-water adjustments very difficult. Even worse, some testers did find themselves out on the water with a clamp that refused to tighten down, making it significantly more difficult to paddle. It’s definitely our least favorite locking mechanism of the group.

Aesthetics


Aesthetics are about more than just looking pretty. A high rating in aesthetics can mean the paddle is meticulously constructed with high-quality materials. It can mean the designer paid extra attention to detail. It can also just mean our testers enjoyed using a paddle even more because it is beautiful and fun to use.


We are a sucker when it comes to natural wood grain, with the Elite 12K Bamboo topping our list when it comes to looks. If you like the sleek, all-black carbon look, then we would suggest the Werner Trance or the *Aqua Bound Malta Carbon**. These paddles both have clean futuristic lines and the high-gloss finish is sure to catch some attention.

We do like the clean and stylish look of the carbon Malta.
We do like the clean and stylish look of the carbon Malta.
Photo: David Wise

Other paddles that scored well in this metric are the NRS Rush, Aqua Bound Malta Fiberglass, Kialoa Tiare, and the Kialoa Makai. These paddles aren't quite as eye-catching as the wood grain paddles but are decently sleek and stylish, with clean lines and graphics. One thing we like about some of the fiberglass paddles, like the Malta, is that they are available in different colors, giving you a bit more of a color palette to work with than the carbon options.

While aesthetics is a highly personal choice, we think there are...
While aesthetics is a highly personal choice, we think there are some paddles that are clearly more stylish than others.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

The extra attention to detail in a SUP paddle can bring joy to its paddler and reflects its craftsmanship and value. Although aesthetics doesn't necessarily affect performance, paddling is supposed to be fun, and a beautiful paddle can make a good time even better. The remainder of the paddles — mainly the plastic and alloy options — all look fine, just a little run-of-the-mill compared to the top-tier fiberglass and carbon paddles.

The shaft of the paddle can be the difference between transferring...
The shaft of the paddle can be the difference between transferring your energy into forward motion or wasting it by bending the paddle.
Photo: Jenna Ammerman

Conclusion


Hopefully, this has been a helpful review and analysis of the side-by-side performance of all the top paddles currently available, whether you are a beginner looking for an all-around paddle on a budget or an expert looking for a top-tier high-performance paddle.

Shey Kiester, Megan Ferney, and Marissa Fox

Ad-free. Influence-free. Powered by Testing.

GearLab is founded on the principle of honest, objective, reviews. Our experts test thousands of products each year using thoughtful test plans that bring out key performance differences between competing products. And, to assure complete independence, we buy all the products we test ourselves. No cherry-picked units sent by manufacturers. No sponsored content. No ads. Just real, honest, side-by-side testing and comparison.

Learn More