Reviews You Can Rely On

Best Ski Boots for Men of 2021-2022

We bought and tested boots from Tecnica, Nordica, Lange, Atomic, and more to help you find the best
The Tecnica Mach 1 flew to the top of our list this year with impressi...
Photo: Scott Rokis
By Ryan Baker ⋅ Review Editor
Tuesday October 26, 2021
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Our industry pros have tested over 30 pairs of the best men's ski boots over the last 7 years, and we recently bought and tested 9 of the market's top models for the 2021-2022 ski season. We put each boot to the test on the snow in a rigorous and objective side-by-side comparison to help you find the best. Whether you want to lay over your skis in a fast GS turn or send it in the park, we tested a boot that will suit your style and budget. We know that the ski boot market is a difficult world to navigate with an overwhelming amount of expensive choices and confusing terms. We are here to make it easy to find the right product to suit your needs and your budget.

Related: Best Ski Boots for Women of 2021-2022

Top 9 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 9
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Awards Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Top Pick Award  Best Buy Award 
Price $749.95 at REI
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$599.95 at REI
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Overall Score Sort Icon
84
83
82
72
72
Star Rating
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Pros Easy to customize, stiff consistent flex, quick-release cam power strap, very warmComfortable walk mode, stiff consistent flex, sturdy constructionComfortable, cork liner, Grip Walk outsolesExcellent medium volume fit, liner, buckles, downhill performanceComfortable, easy instep, variable last ideal for larger feet
Cons Expensive, requires a strong, aggressive skierSmall switch on locking mechanism, heavy, expensiveExpensive, velcro power strapThin tongue on liner, soft rubber soles wear easilySoft flex, low performance
Bottom Line When you want a boot that can drive any ski in any condition, look no furtherA comfortable medium-fit boot made from strong materials that can master the front and backcountry with smile-inducing controlOustanding comfort supplied by a cork and EVA foam liner in a high-performing polyurethane shell makes this one of the most comfortable boots we've testedA high-performance boot in all conditions across the mountain, ideal for expert skiersThis comfortable boot is easy to get on and off with plenty of room and variability for most foot shapes
Rating Categories Tecnica Mach1 MV 130 Tecnica Cochise 130... Nordica Speedmachin... Lange RX 120 Dalbello Panterra 1...
Comfort (30%)
8.0
8.0
9.0
7.0
8.0
Performance (30%)
9.0
9.0
8.0
9.0
6.0
Materials & Durability (20%)
9.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
7.0
Warmth (10%)
7.0
8.0
8.0
6.0
8.0
Features (10%)
8.0
8.0
7.0
4.0
8.0
Specs Tecnica Mach1 MV 130 Tecnica Cochise 130... Nordica Speedmachin... Lange RX 120 Dalbello Panterra 1...
Available Widths LV (98mm)
MV (100mm)
HV (103mm)
99mm only Promachine (98mm)
Speedmachine (100mm)
Sportmachine (102mm)
RX LV (97mm)
RX (100mm)
LX (102mm)
100-102mm (variable)
Available Flexes 110, 120, 130 110, 120, 130 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130 90, 100, 110, 120, 130 90, 100, 120, 130
What We Tested MV (100mm)
130 Flex
99mm
130 Flex
Speedmachine (100 mm)
130 Flex
RX (100mm)
120 Flex
100-102mm (variable)
130 Flex
Walk Mode? No Yes No No Yes
Number of Buckles 4 4 4 4 4
Buckles Microadjustable? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Weight (per boot, size 27.5) 4 lb 3 oz 4 lb 2 oz 4 lb 2 oz 4 lb 12 oz 3 lb 12 oz
Boot Sole Length (size 27.5) 315 mm 315 mm 315 mm 316 mm 318 mm
Liner Thermo-Moldable? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Binding Compatibility Gripwalk/Alpine DYN/Gripwalk Gripwalk/Alpine DIN Gripwalk/Alpine
Shell Material PU PU/PP PU ET/PU DB Hyperlite


Best Overall Men's Ski Boot


Tecnica Mach1 MV 130


84
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 8
  • Performance 9
  • Materials & Durability 9
  • Warmth 7
  • Features 8
Available Widths: LV (98mm), MV (100mm), HV (103mm)
Available Flexes: 110, 120, 130
What We Tested: MV (100mm), 130 Flex
Easy to mold PU shell
Quick-release cam strap at cuff
Stiffest flex
Consistent flex
Grip Walk technology
Expensive

The Tecnica Mach1 is an aggressive boot built to drive any ski in all types of terrain by an experienced skier. The 130 Flex model that we tested felt the stiffest of all the boots in our lineup. It also offers a consistent flex throughout the cuff without any collapsing at the ankle. We love polyurethane (PU), as do most boot fitters, as the premier material to mold the boot to your unique foot shape. PU can be molded and remolded multiple times, and although it is heavier, it is a superior material for an all-mountain boot. The CAS liner is unbelievably comfortable and heat-moldable as well. The cam strap at the top of the cuff holds snug and adds stiffness and stability while turning compared to other models tested.

The price tag of the Mach1 may drive some consumers away but is a solid investment for those who are ready to take their skiing to the next level. Also, for those who like a looser style or spend time in the terrain park, this may not be the boot for you. Tricks and landings usually benefit from a more moderate flex. This boot is perfect for the ski racer or just the Olympic GS wannabe in the rest of us. Whether booting out on groomers or dropping steep chutes, this expert/advanced boot wants to go fast. If your palms are sweating, keep reading, our testers have found the right boot for you.

Read review: Tecnica Mach1 MV

Great Value for Improving Skiers


Atomic Hawx Prime 130S GW


70
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 7
  • Performance 7
  • Materials & Durability 8
  • Warmth 7
  • Features 5
Available Widths: Ultra (98mm), Prime (100mm), Magna (103mm)
Available Flexes: 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130
What We Tested: Hawx Prime (100mm), 130 Flex
Quick-release cam strap
PU construction
Grip Walk
Soft flex
Less responsive

Looking to step up to a more aggressive boot or a comfortable all-day boot for a price that doesn't break the bank? The Atomic Hawx Prime offers roomy comfort in a moldable polyurethane shell. The Prime is not as stiff as other boots in our lineup, falling somewhere in the middle of the pack of boots with a 130 flex rating. The Mimic customizable liner stays warm in sub-freezing temps using Thinsulate technology. We especially liked the quick-release cam strap, though it was not as intuitive to use as other models tested. We also favored the Grip Walk outsoles for walking to and from the lifts.

This boot didn't score as highly in the performance category due to its softer and less consistent flex. Driving through the boot, our testers noted that most of the flex increased as the boot was pushed through high-speed turns. We prefer a boot that will offer consistent flexion throughout the turn so that the skier is not surprised. The 100-millimeter last width feels wider than other models, but the PU construction is moldable for those with larger feet. Check out the similar Hawx Ultra version with a 98-millimeter last if you have a narrower foot. This boot is perfect for less aggressive or lighter skiers. Those who are on a budget will find that the Hawx Prime offers nearly the same performance and qualities of a far more expensive boot.

Read review: Atomic Hawx Prime

Great Value for Large Feet


Dalbello Panterra 130 ID GW


72
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 8
  • Performance 6
  • Materials & Durability 7
  • Warmth 8
  • Features 8
Available Widths: 100-102mm (variable)
Available Flexes: 90, 100, 120, 130
What We Tested: 100-102mm (variable), 130 Flex
Easy to take on and off
Wide last range
Walk mode
Very warm
Soft flex

The Dalbello Panterra ID offers easy access with its Cabrio three-piece design. The PU tongue easily folds up out of the way, making for the most inviting instep we tested. The soft liner detracts from the performance but makes this the warmest boot we tested. The variable last width from 100 to 102 millimeters makes this boot great for those with a wider or higher volume foot. The lower hinge point in the cuff creates less ankle friction. Integrated walk mode makes for more smiles at apres ski and finding your car in the lot. The opposed forefoot buckle design pulls the boot nicely over the top of the foot.

The same attributes that make for easy entry also diminish the responsiveness and performance of the boot. The extra material in the tongue and three-piece construction make this the softest 130 flex boot in our lineup. If you prefer a softer flex or spend time in the park, this could be the perfect boot for you. The soft ID liner is great for walking or hanging out but doesn't perform as well in high-speed turns as firmer liners. All that said, if you have a large foot or a park style, this boot is built with you in mind. The walk mode and Cabrio design also would suit a frame binding in the side-country, but this boot is not compatible with backcountry tech-style bindings.

Read review: Dalbello Panterra ID

Most Versatile Resort and Sidecountry Performance


Tecnica Cochise 130 DYN GW


83
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 8
  • Performance 9
  • Materials & Durability 8
  • Warmth 8
  • Features 8
Available Widths: 99mm only
Available Flexes: 110, 120, 130
What We Tested: 99mm, 130 Flex
Excellent power transfer
PU construction
Walk mode
Versatile
Expensive

The Tecnica Cochise 130 wowed our testers with performance on par or surpassing any resort boot we tested. This is the true one boot quiver able to shred the resort and then turn around and do it in the backcountry. The DYN capable toe cap and 50-degree walk mode make these a pleasure to take on quick side-country and backcountry adventures. The 99-millimeter last is bigger than a true 99 millimeters and fits close to the medium volume Mach1 MV. We found the toe box to have ample room and the PU shell allows for multiple punches should you disagree. The CAS liner is among the most comfortable we tested. It offers plush comfort while remaining firmer than others and is fully heat-moldable. We love the cam strap on the cuff and swear it's every bit as stiff as an aftermarket competitor.

While we love this boot on shorter tours, its whopping four-plus pounds per boot mean that it isn't for the ultra randonnée tour you are planning. Its best use is for resort-accessed side country and roadside tours. Another drawback is the high price tag. But if you get this boot only, you save on having two pairs: one resort and one backcountry; this boot covers both. Another thing to keep in mind is that this is a true 130 flex, very stiff. Tecnica does offer it in 110 and 120 flex for smaller or less aggressive skiers. This boot is perfect for you if you are looking for one boot that can do it all.

Read review: Tecnica Cochise 130

Best for All-Day Comfort


Nordica Speedmachine 3 130 S


82
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Comfort 9
  • Performance 8
  • Materials & Durability 8
  • Warmth 8
  • Features 7
Available Widths: Pro (98mm), Speed (100mm), Sport (102mm)
Available Flexes: 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130
What We Tested: Speedmachine (100mm), 130 Flex
Cork ankle in liner
PU construction
Grip Walk
Adjustable flex
Velcro cuff strap

The unique comfort offered by the Nordica Speedmachine impressed us, earning it a top spot on our lineup. The cork embedded in the liner molds to your ankle but stays fresh due to the cork's inherent moisture-wicking nature. Our testers overall prefer firmer liners as they offer more consistent control. Cork is the winning material in this category, and we hope other brands pick up this innovative design. Further contributing to the comfort of the Speedmachine is our favored PU shell material that can be molded more easily than other materials. The 100-millimeter last width is a very comfortable medium volume boot with ample space in the toe box. The top pressure is just right and easily adjustable with the four-buckle system. Coming in at a lower price than some other competitors tested should also bring a smile to those on a budget. The flex adjustment also offers those looking to increase the stiffness of their boot but maybe on the fence an easily adjustable way to change it from day to day (or even run to run).

We were disappointed that the cuff strap was only a velcro cross piece and did not hold as snug as other models. This boot is advertised as a 130 flex, but our testers found it to be a moderate flex in this category. This may please those skiers who are wishing to move from a 110 or 120 flex into a stiffer boot; this may be the perfect boot for you. Overall, our testers did not have much to complain about and felt this is a great step-up boot or a work boot for ski instructors or patrollers who spend all day in the shell due to its outstanding comfort.

Read review: Nordica Speedmachine

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
84
$750
Editors' Choice Award
An aggressive stiff boot that is high performing for the confident skier
83
$750
Top Pick Award
This boot is for the experienced skier or those looking to step up their game for all conditions in the front country and backcountry, boasting stiff flex and sturdy construction
82
$750
Top Pick Award
Dependable and comfortable, this boot is perfect for instructors, ski patrollers, or anyone who loves their feet
72
$650
Stiff and powerful, the RX 120 is an advanced-level boot for charging hard across the mountain
72
$650
Best Buy Award
This a great boot to step up your skills and an easy one to step into
70
$700
Best Buy Award
If you want to step up your skills into a quality boot that doesn't break the bank, look no further
65
$500
This model is the perfect choice for a skier looking for a lightweight and inexpensive boot
65
$800
Consider these boots if you need one boot that can do it all for the slender footed among us
59
$700
The Alltrack 130 is Rossignol's stiff freeride inspired boot, and it comes equipped with a walk mode

The right boot will comfortably fit your foot and give you all the...
The right boot will comfortably fit your foot and give you all the power you need to control your skis.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Why You Should Trust Us


Our staff brings decades of ski experience to mind when analyzing and testing each boot. Every model has been tested in every array of conditions: groomers, trees, chutes, powder, hardpack, wind buff, and anything else Mother Nature has to offer. We snap the buckles on the coldest days and endure the warmest spring afternoons. Ryan Baker is a professional ski patroller at Mammoth Mountain and usually spends over eight hours each day in a pair of ski boots in every condition imaginable. Carrying heavy loads, skiing toboggans with injured guests, and performing early morning avalanche mitigation describe only some of these scenarios. In his free time, he loves to tour in the backcountry and especially loves finding steep tree skiing.

Ski boots are a very personal purchase, but we determined five metrics that can objectively compare boots across different styles and shapes: comfort, performance, materials & durability, warmth, and extra features. All these metrics are rated in order of importance, with performance and comfort taking the highest percentages. Of course, all of these categories have much interplay. The materials a boot is made from directly affect its comfort. Also, every foot is so different we, therefore, had as many testers as possible to compare notes. We performed side-by-side comparisons in similar terrain or the same run to adjudicate the subtle differences and nuances between boots. We hope that this review not only guides your decision-making but also informs your process so that you avoid dreaded buyer's remorse.

Related: How We Tested Ski Boots

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Analysis and Test Results


We chose our lineup of boots from the leading brands in the ski industry. As many brands maintain the same or similar style and construction in subsequent years, we purposely seek out any models with major changes or updates to compare to the previous class. We strive to test with as few variables as possible, repeating lines with different boots, one right after the other, to have side-by-side comparisons in all conditions. Each model is scored on performance, comfort, materials and durability, warmth, and extra features.

Related: Buying Advice for Ski Boots


Value


Skiing is an industry, like most, where a higher price typically denotes better materials, better workmanship, proven performance, or durability. All the boots we tested are the premier model offered by their respective brand in a medium volume and last width. Usually, a less expensive boot is not equipped to perform to the expectation of a pro or expert but is designed for an intermediate to advanced skier. In this lineup, the Atomic Hawx Prime and the Dalbello Panterra stand out for their value. While they don't offer the top-end precision and power of some of our top-rated boots, they make great options for those who value comfort, balanced performance, and affordability.

Comfort


Although comfort is in the eye of the beholder, we strived to make this rating as objective as possible. We considered the material the boot is made from and how easy molding and working the boot would be. The Tecnica Mach1 and the Nordica Speedmachine are examples of boots made primarily of polyurethane (PU). Boot fitters favor PU for its easy workability, and it can withstand multiple punches in the same area. This is in contrast to Grilamid, which can become brittle after it is molded.


We also looked at how easy it is to navigate the different width offerings in each model from a specific boot manufacturer. The Atomic Hawx Prime is a medium last boot, whereas Atomic also offers the Hawx in a narrow Ultra version and a wide Magna version. Nordica, for example, also changes the name of its boot between widths, with the Promachine, Speedmachine, and Sportmachine. It's a small bone to pick but one that nonetheless could throw off and confuse potential customers. Look carefully at the specs we provide for each boot to help understand the different offerings.

It is important to consider how comfortable the boot is fresh out of the box. The Dalbello Panterra has a variable last (100 to 102 millimeters) and a very plush liner. The extra room and variability make for a roomy, easy-to-slip-on boot. This is great for a skier who isn't yet ready to suffer through the foot scrunching that may come with increased performance but detracts from the accuracy and precision necessary to carve at high speed.

Our testers were also very concerned with the toe box. The Fischer Ranger One has a very narrow and low toe box. This may serve certain foot shapes appropriately but rejects a large population who would need the Grilamid expanded to avoid cutting off circulation.

The Fischer Ranger has a very snug and precise-fitting toe box that...
The Fischer Ranger has a very snug and precise-fitting toe box that may fit some users perfectly but may reduce its versatility for a wider range of foot shapes.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Many skiers prefer a tight cuff, snug pressure on the top of the foot to reduce heal rise, and enough room to just wiggle your toes. That said, no top manufacturer makes a bad boot. But, some manufacturers will play to some shapes more than others, while some offer an array of boots for most consumers. We took heal rise, toe room, and cuff pressure for the average foot as a benchmark. We also looked at the liner materials and construction. The Nordica Speedmachine stands out in the comfort category because of its moldable liner with an integrated cork insert.

There are so many boots on the market but few offer all-day comfort...
There are so many boots on the market but few offer all-day comfort and support in all weather conditions. We put the Speedmachine to the test and never felt desperate to take them off.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Performance


What you ask a boot to do and what it can do in response is the essence of performance. We asked the Tecnica Cochise 130 to carve, hop turn, tour, hike, and ski every type of snow the Sierra Nevada had to offer. To all this, it performed marvelously, ranking it the highest in this category. For this metric, we looked at the flex rating, including consistency across the cuff and lateral movement, in short, medium, and long radius turns, as well as in hop turns, and power stops. In effect, we aimed to see how the boot reacted in as controlled of an environment as possible.


All the boots tested in this year's lineup are a 130 flex, but we found a great diversity of stiffness within this group. Our testers favored boots with stiffer flexes such as the Cochise and the Mach1 for fast, high-intensity skiing. The softer flex of the Hawx Ultra or the Panterra is great for the park or less aggressive skiers. We performed drills of the above-stated turns and maneuvers to determine how well it controlled the skis.

The Cochise provides fun all day wherever you want to go, the DYN...
The Cochise provides fun all day wherever you want to go, the DYN inserts make this boot versatile for both the resort and the backcountry.
Photo: Scott Rokis

The Mach1, the Cochise, and the Speedmachine performed best at high speed and in every turn due to the consistent flex and stiffness. We also liked the quick-release cam straps offered by both Tecnica models and the Atomic Hawx Prime to add further control up the cuff. The Speedmachine performs in the middle and is a great option for a less aggressive style or a skier looking to level up to a firmer flex but not ready for the rigidity of a true race boot.

One of our favorite boots, the Tecnica Mach  1 can hop, drop, stomp...
One of our favorite boots, the Tecnica Mach 1 can hop, drop, stomp, and shred.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Materials & Durability


Durability is difficult to test adequately in the limited time frame of this review. We did not experience any buckle failures, sole depletion, fractures, or failures in months of testing and pushing these boots as hard as we know how to. Some features caused us to pause and maybe could be of concern after years of abuse. We put all these boots through the usual wear and tear that they would experience by years of use: ground into the asphalt on many trips back to the car, kicking steps, hiking over scree, clambering in the trees, and clicking into various bindings.


Our favored construction material for the shell is Polyurathane (PU). This is an easily moldable and very strong plastic. Varying degrees of thickness can change the weight or flex of a boot. The heaviest race boots are thick PU and usually are ground out rather than punched. Polyurethane resort boots are less thick and can be molded or ground to suit the user's needs. Grilamid is a lighter polymer common in touring boots that is lighter than PU and still strong but less adept at molding and shaping. Brands also manufacture boots in proprietary hybrid plastics such as Dalbello's DB Hyperlite in the Panterra, including Grip Walk soles for added durability.

Replaceable Grip Walk caps, so nice for added security and longevity...
Replaceable Grip Walk caps, so nice for added security and longevity as long as they are replaced periodically.
Photo: Ryan Baker

Almost all major brands offer a heat-moldable liner. This ubiquitous offering promotes further comfort individualizing the fit for each user. We gave higher marks to brands that include a moldable liner, like the CAS system from Tecnica or the 3D from Nordica. Another important factor to consider in longevity is interchangeable toe and heel caps.

We love the fully removable and moldable tongue on the Mach1, such a...
We love the fully removable and moldable tongue on the Mach1, such a treat for your shins.
Photo: Ryan Baker

Warmth


The warmth of a boot can be a blessing or a curse. The air in the boot creates the best insulation. This requires a slight amount of space, especially in the toe box, to allow the feet to stay warm. A boot that is too tight will cut off circulation and put the foot in closer contact with the elements without the insulating air. On the other side, a very warm boot can cause sweating and discomfort on a warm spring day. In an ideal world, you would have a boot that can serve both.

We tested these boots in sub-freezing mornings and blistering spring afternoons. The Dalbello Panterra proved to be exceedingly warm even on the coldest days due to its plush liner and variable last. The Fischer Ranger One scored low due to its slender profile and minimal liner, the cost of cutting weight for a touring boot. All boots can be outfitted with aftermarket boot warmers which we recommend for the coldest climates.

Unfortunately, the Ranger&#039;s stock liner is a bit thin and is not...
Unfortunately, the Ranger's stock liner is a bit thin and is not advertised as being heat moldable.
Photo: Ryan Baker

The Atomic Hawx Prime also scored highly with a larger feeling last for its stated 100-millimeter last width and a softer plush liner. The firmer liners, such as the CAS from Tecnica, stay considerably warm but sacrifice some warmth for firmer materials to promote higher performance and power transfer. On tours and while hiking, the Tecnica Cochise ventilated very well due to its extendable buckle system, which allows you to ascend with the buckles wide open but still clasped, so they are not flopping about. Excessive overheating was not noted on any model tested in spring conditions.

These roomy boots stayed warm on most days as long as you aren&#039;t...
These roomy boots stayed warm on most days as long as you aren't maxing out the inside of the shell.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Extra Features


The bells and whistles section of ski boots usually includes a walk mode, Grip Walk soles, inserts, or special features that make the boot stand out. This metric allows some models to shine where they otherwise haven't. For example, the walk mode in the Fischer Ranger One was well received by our testers. It is integrated into the top buckle, so you won't readily forget it before you drop in (unless you forget to buckle your boots altogether). We also liked the locking mechanism on the Cochise to keep the boot in ski mode. There are few things as harrowing and unsafe as descending, only to realize that your boot is still in walk mode.


Perhaps our favorite extra doodad was the quick-release cam strap on the cuff touted by the Mach1, the Cochise, the Ranger, and the Hawx Prime. Of these, Tecnica makes the most intuitive to use and easiest to release, giving two boots that already scored high even higher marks. This category won't unseat any champions but is well worth considering if you enjoy the ease of walk mode or micro-adjust buckles.

The Cochise has one of the best power straps with a removable...
The Cochise has one of the best power straps with a removable locking cam.
Photo: Ryan Baker

Conclusion


The ski boot market is full of excellent products ready to suit every level and ability of riders. The above metrics are the standard by which we have rated some of the top boots on the market for this upcoming season. We did our best to scrutinize every boot in similar circumstances to provide you with the best information to find the boot that will help you launch into the next level of your skiing! Our testers racked up dozens of days and countless hours in each boot to meticulously provide you with our opinion of the best boots of 2021/22.

If you are a beginner or intermediate, top brands offer the...
If you are a beginner or intermediate, top brands offer the top-of-the-line boots in softer flexes to work your technique.
Photo: Scott Rokis

Ryan Baker

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